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Janeane Garofalo

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March 12, 2007
Comedy Garofalo at Rams Head Live Janeane Garofalo, the former Majority Report co-host, will bring her cynicism and political commentary to Rams Head Live tonight at 7. The perform ance will take place at Power Plant Live, 20 Market Place. Tickets are $29-$40. Call 410-244-1131 or go to ram sheadlive.com.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Given the size of Keith Olbermann's audience on Current TV, what goes on during his "Countdown" show probably isn't worth the energy it takes to denounce it. On the other hand, the more marginalized he becomes, the more likely it is that "Countdown" will become a crucible for the kind of reckless and possibly slanderous speech Olbermann allowed from Janeane Garofalo Wednesday night. And part of this job is to identify such speech and warn of its dangers. This utterly unsubstantiated attack on GOP candidate Herman Cain, with its allegations that he must be getting "paid" by someone to run as a Republican, is outrageous.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
"Clay Pigeons" is a slick piece of work, visually pleasing and blessed with some good performances, but finally the style and vigor thrown at it don't make up for its beleaguered story. The film has flashes of humor but no brilliance or narrative complexity; it's "Red Rock West" for lazy people.Joaquin Phoenix, the sleepy-eyed, thick-tongued actor from "To Die For," plays Clay, a mechanic living in Mercer, Mont., deep in the land of sky-blue waters. Lest filmgoers think "Clay Pigeons" is another eponymous pun on the order of "Good Will Hunting," Clay is no pigeon -- which is why he gets into trouble over and over again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
Janeane Garofalo follows politics, talks about politics, at times even finds it funny - although in an absurd, disturbing way. Sometimes, politics even creeps its way into her stand-up routines. But Garofalo is not, she stresses, a political comic. Those who go to her Baltimore show this weekend - scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday at Rams Head Live - expecting an evening of political humor may end up disappointed. "I don't know why some people would think, after all these years I've been doing stand-up, that politics is the dominant theme of my show, because it isn't," the 44-year-old comic says over the phone from Long Island, where she had just finished a gig at the Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 14, 2006
The Wild is simply the latest in what has been a years-long creative holding pattern for the animators at Disney, who seem to have lost the ability to come up with anything new and fresh. The only difference here is that, while audiences may think they've seen movies like Chicken Little before, they'll know they've seen The Wild before. Because they have. Like last year's Madagascar, The Wild is about a zoo animal that mistakenly finds its way back to Africa and the wild, and about a group of zoo friends who set out to rescue and bring it back to the safety of its cage.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
"The Matchmaker" is so full of blarney, it practically dances its own jig.It's so obsessed with Ireland, you'd swear the sky was green.It's so full of the Irish, you'll walk out of the theater sticking an O' in front of your name and singing "Danny Boy."And if all that sounds like nothing short of an "Erin go bragh" overdose well, it is. Save for one very redeeming grace.That would be Janeane Garofalo, whose benevolently cynical demeanor -- not to mention 100-watt smile -- turns what could have been an annoyingly cute pastiche of quirky Irish stereotypes into a charmer that manages to remain just this side of overbearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
Janeane Garofalo follows politics, talks about politics, at times even finds it funny - although in an absurd, disturbing way. Sometimes, politics even creeps its way into her stand-up routines. But Garofalo is not, she stresses, a political comic. Those who go to her Baltimore show this weekend - scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday at Rams Head Live - expecting an evening of political humor may end up disappointed. "I don't know why some people would think, after all these years I've been doing stand-up, that politics is the dominant theme of my show, because it isn't," the 44-year-old comic says over the phone from Long Island, where she had just finished a gig at the Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 14, 1997
Zany, wacky, goofy and even pretty darn nutty, here comes "Touch," which refers not to low-impact football but to the finger of the Almighty.Derived from an Elmore Leonard novel by Paul ("Taxi Driver") Schrader and starring Christopher Walken, the movie carries with it expectations that everybody is only too happy to smash to pieces. No, darn it, it's not a sleazy, violent, tensely plotted, quirky tale of small-beer crooks and cops, as one might expect from the magic teaming of the Leonard, Schrader and Walken sensibilities.
NEWS
By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | November 17, 1996
Everyone knows that tricks are for kids. But tell that to Esquire, whose November cover story parodies the recent rage for starlet-of-the-moment interviews: the funniest, silliest, most ridiculous, all-around-goofy piece of faux journalism we've seen in a coon coat's age.It's a (faux) interview with the latest (faux) starlet out of Hollywood: Allegra Coleman, a gorgeous (faux) bimbo-babe-from-Hollywood who makes dumb men drool and smart women giggle.Let me give you a whiff of the writer's particular air of je ne sais quoi:"The Colemans, a legendary family of circus performers and poets, were always broke and often drunk.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff | September 28, 1997
In the summertime, Steven Spielberg gave us a fantasy about dinosaurs rampaging through the streets of San Diego. In December, Spielberg will open "Amistad," the wrenching, true story of an 1839 uprising on a Spanish slave ship.The two Spielberg films represent the traditional Hollywood distinction between our summer and fall movie appetites. During the hot weather, the thinking goes, we want to be thrilled, usually mindlessly so. Sometime around Labor Day, movie studios believe, we recover our IQs. So armed, we are ready to handle more challenging fare.
FEATURES
March 12, 2007
Comedy Garofalo at Rams Head Live Janeane Garofalo, the former Majority Report co-host, will bring her cynicism and political commentary to Rams Head Live tonight at 7. The perform ance will take place at Power Plant Live, 20 Market Place. Tickets are $29-$40. Call 410-244-1131 or go to ram sheadlive.com.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 14, 2006
The Wild is simply the latest in what has been a years-long creative holding pattern for the animators at Disney, who seem to have lost the ability to come up with anything new and fresh. The only difference here is that, while audiences may think they've seen movies like Chicken Little before, they'll know they've seen The Wild before. Because they have. Like last year's Madagascar, The Wild is about a zoo animal that mistakenly finds its way back to Africa and the wild, and about a group of zoo friends who set out to rescue and bring it back to the safety of its cage.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
"Clay Pigeons" is a slick piece of work, visually pleasing and blessed with some good performances, but finally the style and vigor thrown at it don't make up for its beleaguered story. The film has flashes of humor but no brilliance or narrative complexity; it's "Red Rock West" for lazy people.Joaquin Phoenix, the sleepy-eyed, thick-tongued actor from "To Die For," plays Clay, a mechanic living in Mercer, Mont., deep in the land of sky-blue waters. Lest filmgoers think "Clay Pigeons" is another eponymous pun on the order of "Good Will Hunting," Clay is no pigeon -- which is why he gets into trouble over and over again.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
"The Matchmaker" is so full of blarney, it practically dances its own jig.It's so obsessed with Ireland, you'd swear the sky was green.It's so full of the Irish, you'll walk out of the theater sticking an O' in front of your name and singing "Danny Boy."And if all that sounds like nothing short of an "Erin go bragh" overdose well, it is. Save for one very redeeming grace.That would be Janeane Garofalo, whose benevolently cynical demeanor -- not to mention 100-watt smile -- turns what could have been an annoyingly cute pastiche of quirky Irish stereotypes into a charmer that manages to remain just this side of overbearing.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff | September 28, 1997
In the summertime, Steven Spielberg gave us a fantasy about dinosaurs rampaging through the streets of San Diego. In December, Spielberg will open "Amistad," the wrenching, true story of an 1839 uprising on a Spanish slave ship.The two Spielberg films represent the traditional Hollywood distinction between our summer and fall movie appetites. During the hot weather, the thinking goes, we want to be thrilled, usually mindlessly so. Sometime around Labor Day, movie studios believe, we recover our IQs. So armed, we are ready to handle more challenging fare.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 14, 1997
Zany, wacky, goofy and even pretty darn nutty, here comes "Touch," which refers not to low-impact football but to the finger of the Almighty.Derived from an Elmore Leonard novel by Paul ("Taxi Driver") Schrader and starring Christopher Walken, the movie carries with it expectations that everybody is only too happy to smash to pieces. No, darn it, it's not a sleazy, violent, tensely plotted, quirky tale of small-beer crooks and cops, as one might expect from the magic teaming of the Leonard, Schrader and Walken sensibilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Given the size of Keith Olbermann's audience on Current TV, what goes on during his "Countdown" show probably isn't worth the energy it takes to denounce it. On the other hand, the more marginalized he becomes, the more likely it is that "Countdown" will become a crucible for the kind of reckless and possibly slanderous speech Olbermann allowed from Janeane Garofalo Wednesday night. And part of this job is to identify such speech and warn of its dangers. This utterly unsubstantiated attack on GOP candidate Herman Cain, with its allegations that he must be getting "paid" by someone to run as a Republican, is outrageous.
FEATURES
September 28, 2007
73 Brigitte Bardot Actress 43 Janeane Garofalo Comedian 40 Moon Zappa TV personality 39 Naomi Watts Actress 20 Hilary Duff Actress
NEWS
By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | November 17, 1996
Everyone knows that tricks are for kids. But tell that to Esquire, whose November cover story parodies the recent rage for starlet-of-the-moment interviews: the funniest, silliest, most ridiculous, all-around-goofy piece of faux journalism we've seen in a coon coat's age.It's a (faux) interview with the latest (faux) starlet out of Hollywood: Allegra Coleman, a gorgeous (faux) bimbo-babe-from-Hollywood who makes dumb men drool and smart women giggle.Let me give you a whiff of the writer's particular air of je ne sais quoi:"The Colemans, a legendary family of circus performers and poets, were always broke and often drunk.
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