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By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 12, 1993
Decades from now, Jane Goodall figures, humans will look back at the nabbing of chimpanzees to be pets and medical guinea pigs as regretfully as they do the human slave trade.She predicts that we will liken the act of isolating our thinking, feeling chimpanzee cousins in tiny boxes for medical testing to the shameful practice of warehousing mentally ill humans.We will wish, she says, that we had learned from our earlier, shameful mistakes.Ms. Goodall is the Margaret Meade of the primate world, the chimpanzee chum who has spent a career studying apes in Africa.
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By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Madeline Xi Cui Friedman was born in China and has lived much of her life with her family in western Howard County, but she considers herself a global citizen. The 17-year-old high school senior attends the Shanghai Community International School in China but spends much of her summer at Sharp's at Waterford Farm, a 530-acre family vegetable and livestock operation in Brookeville. At an age when many of her contemporaries might be planning spring break or post-graduation trips, Friedman has already traveled to many parts of the world, visiting several impoverished regions.
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By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
When Carrie Gardner hears the name Jane Goodall, she thinks immediately of one thing."Baby chimpanzees," said the 13-year-old seventh-grader at Magothy River Middle School in Arnold. "With big smiles on their faces."Carrie and about 300 of her classmates got to meet the woman who helped change the way humans look at chimpanzees yesterday when Dr. Goodall visited the school.The pioneering primate researcher, who will lecture tonight at George Washington University's Lizner Auditorium, spent about an hour showing the children slides taken during more than 30 years of studying and caring for wild chimpanzees in Gombe, a remote town on the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika in Tanzania.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | November 26, 2006
The only better first name would have been Eve. But Jane did just fine. When Jane Goodall emerged from the forest of Tanzania with her tales of life with the chimpanzees, her timing was perfect. National Geographic introduced this gentle, determined woman to the world in its August 1963 issue in an article entitled My Life with the Wild Chimpanzees. Jane Goodall: The Woman who Redefined Man Dale Peterson Houghton Mifflin / 742 pages / $35
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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
So who was the genius who picked the National Aquarium's Marine Mammal Pavilion for a lecture Sunday morning by Jane Goodall?The celebrated environmental campaigner and chronicler of the lives of wild chimpanzees hates the idea of captive performing dolphins.She has dedicated her life to confronting the economic forces and the ignorance that denude the forests surrounding her beloved Gombe Wildlife Preserve in Tanzania and that encourage pet traders, zoos and medical labs to mistreat wild and captive animals.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | November 26, 2006
The only better first name would have been Eve. But Jane did just fine. When Jane Goodall emerged from the forest of Tanzania with her tales of life with the chimpanzees, her timing was perfect. National Geographic introduced this gentle, determined woman to the world in its August 1963 issue in an article entitled My Life with the Wild Chimpanzees. Jane Goodall: The Woman who Redefined Man Dale Peterson Houghton Mifflin / 742 pages / $35
FEATURES
February 9, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/1. How old was Jane Goodall on her first trip to Africa?2. At Freezone, what is the first rule to become an e-pal? (Go to http://www. freezone.com to find out.)3. Name the three mice in one of the Pitara poems.Pitara``Pitara'' means ``chest full of surprises'' in Hindi, and surprises are just what you'll find when you click your way to http://www. pitara.com. Pitara is a cool site for preteens who want a different view of the world - and who want to be treated like smart kids!
NEWS
By Meredith F. Small and Meredith F. Small,Newsday | April 25, 1993
VISIONS OF CALIBAN: ONCHIMPANZEES AND PEOPLE.Dale Peterson and Jane Goodall.Houghton Mifflin.# 367 pages. $22.95. About 8 million years ago, humans shared a common ancestor with the chimpanzee. This forebear wasn't really human; neither was it exactly like the modern chimp. It was a common species from which we and the apes diverged.The kinship between humans and chimpanzees is evident today in the many things we share: more than 98 percent of our genes, similarities in behavior and, most important, common emotional responses.
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By Valerie Feldner and Valerie Feldner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2002
Her job description might be "trying to save the world." She spends almost 300 days of the year on the road lobbying, lecturing, fund-raising, educating and overseeing conservation projects, and is remarkably chipper, considering the state of the planet. At 68, Jane Goodall still looks like the ponytailed young woman who, 39 years ago, came into our living rooms in a National Geographic documentary about her groundbreaking study of a chimpanzee troupe in Gombe National Park in what is now called Tanzania.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | August 13, 2006
Jane Goodall believes in Bigfoot, but not in poker-playing chimps. The famous primatologist, who has traveled the world to study our furry cousins, probably hasn't ventured to Elkton. If she had, she could have met Mikey the Chimp - unless he was in Vegas, trying to enter the World Series of Poker. World Series officials refused late last month to let Mikey participate, even though a gambling Web site was willing to pony up the $10,000 entry fee as a publicity stunt. The Jane Goodall Institute and the Humane Society of the United States issued a joint statement, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported: "Chimpanzees are wild animals who belong in the wild, not in our homes or casinos."
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | August 13, 2006
Jane Goodall believes in Bigfoot, but not in poker-playing chimps. The famous primatologist, who has traveled the world to study our furry cousins, probably hasn't ventured to Elkton. If she had, she could have met Mikey the Chimp - unless he was in Vegas, trying to enter the World Series of Poker. World Series officials refused late last month to let Mikey participate, even though a gambling Web site was willing to pony up the $10,000 entry fee as a publicity stunt. The Jane Goodall Institute and the Humane Society of the United States issued a joint statement, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported: "Chimpanzees are wild animals who belong in the wild, not in our homes or casinos."
FEATURES
By Valerie Feldner and Valerie Feldner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2002
Her job description might be "trying to save the world." She spends almost 300 days of the year on the road lobbying, lecturing, fund-raising, educating and overseeing conservation projects, and is remarkably chipper, considering the state of the planet. At 68, Jane Goodall still looks like the ponytailed young woman who, 39 years ago, came into our living rooms in a National Geographic documentary about her groundbreaking study of a chimpanzee troupe in Gombe National Park in what is now called Tanzania.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
So who was the genius who picked the National Aquarium's Marine Mammal Pavilion for a lecture Sunday morning by Jane Goodall?The celebrated environmental campaigner and chronicler of the lives of wild chimpanzees hates the idea of captive performing dolphins.She has dedicated her life to confronting the economic forces and the ignorance that denude the forests surrounding her beloved Gombe Wildlife Preserve in Tanzania and that encourage pet traders, zoos and medical labs to mistreat wild and captive animals.
FEATURES
February 9, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/1. How old was Jane Goodall on her first trip to Africa?2. At Freezone, what is the first rule to become an e-pal? (Go to http://www. freezone.com to find out.)3. Name the three mice in one of the Pitara poems.Pitara``Pitara'' means ``chest full of surprises'' in Hindi, and surprises are just what you'll find when you click your way to http://www. pitara.com. Pitara is a cool site for preteens who want a different view of the world - and who want to be treated like smart kids!
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1998
Montgomery County has animal magnetism.Home to the Humane Society of the United States, the largest office of the Fund for Animals and a half-dozen smaller advocacy groups, the county recently added renowned primate researcher Jane Goodall to the stable.The bait?Proximity to power without residing in the high-rent district. An almost limitless pool of volunteers. Access to some of the world's greatest research libraries. A large press corps eager to cover a staged event.And, for some organizations, a short commute for the boss.
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 21, 1996
Bart Walter is best known in Maryland for the bronze otters playing in the fountain at the Baltimore Zoo's front gate.The Pleasant Valley sculptor, who specializes in animals, is likely to attract renewed attention in the state with his newest work: a life-size gorilla that will be dedicated tomorrow at Salisbury State University.The gorilla, based on the main character in Daniel Quinn's novel "Ismael," was commissioned by the university because a popular honors class centers on the book, in which the author uses a gorilla as a literary device to comment on mankind.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1998
Montgomery County has animal magnetism.Home to the Humane Society of the United States, the largest office of the Fund for Animals and a half-dozen smaller advocacy groups, the county recently added renowned primate researcher Jane Goodall to the stable.The bait?Proximity to power without residing in the high-rent district. An almost limitless pool of volunteers. Access to some of the world's greatest research libraries. A large press corps eager to cover a staged event.And, for some organizations, a short commute for the boss.
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 21, 1996
Bart Walter is best known in Maryland for the bronze otters playing in the fountain at the Baltimore Zoo's front gate.The Pleasant Valley sculptor, who specializes in animals, is likely to attract renewed attention in the state with his newest work: a life-size gorilla that will be dedicated tomorrow at Salisbury State University.The gorilla, based on the main character in Daniel Quinn's novel "Ismael," was commissioned by the university because a popular honors class centers on the book, in which the author uses a gorilla as a literary device to comment on mankind.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
When Carrie Gardner hears the name Jane Goodall, she thinks immediately of one thing."Baby chimpanzees," said the 13-year-old seventh-grader at Magothy River Middle School in Arnold. "With big smiles on their faces."Carrie and about 300 of her classmates got to meet the woman who helped change the way humans look at chimpanzees yesterday when Dr. Goodall visited the school.The pioneering primate researcher, who will lecture tonight at George Washington University's Lizner Auditorium, spent about an hour showing the children slides taken during more than 30 years of studying and caring for wild chimpanzees in Gombe, a remote town on the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika in Tanzania.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 12, 1993
Decades from now, Jane Goodall figures, humans will look back at the nabbing of chimpanzees to be pets and medical guinea pigs as regretfully as they do the human slave trade.She predicts that we will liken the act of isolating our thinking, feeling chimpanzee cousins in tiny boxes for medical testing to the shameful practice of warehousing mentally ill humans.We will wish, she says, that we had learned from our earlier, shameful mistakes.Ms. Goodall is the Margaret Meade of the primate world, the chimpanzee chum who has spent a career studying apes in Africa.
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