Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJane Doe
IN THE NEWS

Jane Doe

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2004
In an effort to encourage rape victims to disclose the notoriously underreported crime, Cecil County has joined a handful of localities nationwide that allow people to provide police with physical evidence and details about the offense without filing a formal report that would trigger prosecution. The police cannot analyze the evidence unless the victim authorizes an investigation. After three months, it is destroyed. This "Jane Doe" reporting - the first of its kind in the state, offered at Union Hospital in Elkton - is applauded by organizations against sexual assault, which would like to see similar programs widely implemented nationwide.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Rape is a notoriously difficult crime to prosecute. Of every 100 rapes nationwide, 46 are reported, 12 lead to arrests and three result in prison sentences. To improve those odds, advocates are encouraging more nurses to receive the training to give a forensic examination that can be key to securing a conviction. Prosecutions are difficult when a victim fails to get a prompt examination. And with TV crime dramas such as "CSI" raising expectations among juries, prosecutors and victims' advocates view the forensic exam as more essential than ever.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 3, 2005
RAPE IS A crime of violence that can leave its victim emotionally scarred and unwilling to report an attack to police. Public safety campaigns about the need for victims to come forward have led to an increase in reporting the crime over the past four years, according to a recent National Crime Victimization Survey released by federal officials. And yet victims who do report represent only slightly more than 50 percent of those attacked, the figures show. Though the national trend to report is upward, health care professionals at Cecil County's main hospital have adopted an unusual protocol for victims reluctant to call police.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporter | April 6, 2008
For years, authorities have faced a serious problem in sexual assault cases: Victims often do not report the crime for several days, and by then, it's too late to gather crucial medical evidence. Now two Maryland counties are experimenting with so-called "Jane Doe" rape examination kits, which allow victims to have DNA and other evidence from an assault collected and stored, without involving police. The materials are sealed and stored in case the victim changes her mind and reports the attack.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporter | April 6, 2008
For years, authorities have faced a serious problem in sexual assault cases: Victims often do not report the crime for several days, and by then, it's too late to gather crucial medical evidence. Now two Maryland counties are experimenting with so-called "Jane Doe" rape examination kits, which allow victims to have DNA and other evidence from an assault collected and stored, without involving police. The materials are sealed and stored in case the victim changes her mind and reports the attack.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1999
Joining a growing trend toward class action litigation against HMOs, a Maryland woman is suing CareFirst BlueCross Blue-Shield and Green Spring Health Services, the mental health manager for Blue Cross, over refusal to pay a claim.The plaintiff in the case, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, is identified only as Jane Doe, a Maryland resident, in the court filing because of the "confidential and sensitive nature" of her case.Her daughter, called Susan Doe in the filing, was treated at a mental health facility in New Jersey from April 30 to Sept.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 5, 2005
He was a high-level diplomat in Cold War Eastern Europe who had grown disillusioned with communism and wanted to defect to the United States. Then the Central Intelligence Agency stepped in with an offer he and his wife say they could not refuse. If the couple agreed to spy for the United States, the CIA promised U.S. citizenship and lifetime support. But years after the Cold War's thaw, the former Eastern Bloc spies, now living under assumed names in Washington state, say the agency did not keep its end of the deal.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- There was a time in American politics when you could watch a television ad and know at once that it was for one candidate or against another. If it praised or glorified a candidate by name and showed him helping an elderly citizen across the street, you had no doubt what the message was.You got the message easily, too, when the ad put the rap on the opposition candidate. And a disclaimer bearing the sponsor's name across the bottom of the screen -- Republicans for Joe Smith or Democrats for Jane Doe -- let you know clearly whose money had bought it.If a serious issue happened to be discussed in the process, it was not presented in much depth and it was always offered in the context of a candidate's bid for public office, or, increasingly as time went by, as part of an effort to defeat a candidate.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Rape is a notoriously difficult crime to prosecute. Of every 100 rapes nationwide, 46 are reported, 12 lead to arrests and three result in prison sentences. To improve those odds, advocates are encouraging more nurses to receive the training to give a forensic examination that can be key to securing a conviction. Prosecutions are difficult when a victim fails to get a prompt examination. And with TV crime dramas such as "CSI" raising expectations among juries, prosecutors and victims' advocates view the forensic exam as more essential than ever.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
When a young woman's body was discovered on a road near a cemetery in Woodlawn in 1976, Baltimore County police had hundreds of leads -- people called nearly every day to say that their sister or friend or a dancer they'd seen on the Block resembled the victim, who had been strangled. But it has been a long time since anyone has called about the unsolved killing, and even longer since someone has tried to help detectives identify the woman, who remains known simply as Jane Doe. More than 26 years after her death, Baltimore County police tried again yesterday to generate interest in a case that has led them all over the country in search of information to help them figure out who the woman was, who killed her and why. "There's no particular lead, no new development in the case," said Bill Toohey, a county police spokesman.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 5, 2005
He was a high-level diplomat in Cold War Eastern Europe who had grown disillusioned with communism and wanted to defect to the United States. Then the Central Intelligence Agency stepped in with an offer he and his wife say they could not refuse. If the couple agreed to spy for the United States, the CIA promised U.S. citizenship and lifetime support. But years after the Cold War's thaw, the former Eastern Bloc spies, now living under assumed names in Washington state, say the agency did not keep its end of the deal.
NEWS
January 3, 2005
RAPE IS A crime of violence that can leave its victim emotionally scarred and unwilling to report an attack to police. Public safety campaigns about the need for victims to come forward have led to an increase in reporting the crime over the past four years, according to a recent National Crime Victimization Survey released by federal officials. And yet victims who do report represent only slightly more than 50 percent of those attacked, the figures show. Though the national trend to report is upward, health care professionals at Cecil County's main hospital have adopted an unusual protocol for victims reluctant to call police.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2004
In an effort to encourage rape victims to disclose the notoriously underreported crime, Cecil County has joined a handful of localities nationwide that allow people to provide police with physical evidence and details about the offense without filing a formal report that would trigger prosecution. The police cannot analyze the evidence unless the victim authorizes an investigation. After three months, it is destroyed. This "Jane Doe" reporting - the first of its kind in the state, offered at Union Hospital in Elkton - is applauded by organizations against sexual assault, which would like to see similar programs widely implemented nationwide.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
When a young woman's body was discovered on a road near a cemetery in Woodlawn in 1976, Baltimore County police had hundreds of leads -- people called nearly every day to say that their sister or friend or a dancer they'd seen on the Block resembled the victim, who had been strangled. But it has been a long time since anyone has called about the unsolved killing, and even longer since someone has tried to help detectives identify the woman, who remains known simply as Jane Doe. More than 26 years after her death, Baltimore County police tried again yesterday to generate interest in a case that has led them all over the country in search of information to help them figure out who the woman was, who killed her and why. "There's no particular lead, no new development in the case," said Bill Toohey, a county police spokesman.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1999
Joining a growing trend toward class action litigation against HMOs, a Maryland woman is suing CareFirst BlueCross Blue-Shield and Green Spring Health Services, the mental health manager for Blue Cross, over refusal to pay a claim.The plaintiff in the case, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, is identified only as Jane Doe, a Maryland resident, in the court filing because of the "confidential and sensitive nature" of her case.Her daughter, called Susan Doe in the filing, was treated at a mental health facility in New Jersey from April 30 to Sept.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- There was a time in American politics when you could watch a television ad and know at once that it was for one candidate or against another. If it praised or glorified a candidate by name and showed him helping an elderly citizen across the street, you had no doubt what the message was.You got the message easily, too, when the ad put the rap on the opposition candidate. And a disclaimer bearing the sponsor's name across the bottom of the screen -- Republicans for Joe Smith or Democrats for Jane Doe -- let you know clearly whose money had bought it.If a serious issue happened to be discussed in the process, it was not presented in much depth and it was always offered in the context of a candidate's bid for public office, or, increasingly as time went by, as part of an effort to defeat a candidate.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 13, 1992
Boston. -- This is how the Magic Johnson story moves from one public place to another. Off the basketball court and into the court of law.One day, the man with the megawatt smile is forced to face his teammates' fears that they could be infected by him. The next day, he's forced to face a woman's claim that she was infected by him.One week his book is published bearing this paragraph about his many sexual partners: ''Of the women I have talked to, nobody...
NEWS
February 22, 2010
Authorities say skeletal human remains have been found on the grounds of a bed and breakfast in downtown Snow Hill. The remains were found after several hours of a search connected with a larger investigation. The remains are believed to be a woman's, and the person is being referred to as "Jane Doe." The remains were sent to the state Medical Examiner's office in Baltimore for identification. Worcester County State's Attorney Joel Todd says it would be inappropriate to immediately provide more details of the investigation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.