Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJane Alexander
IN THE NEWS

Jane Alexander

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Annapolis -- Yellow postcards and several hundred outspoken supporters of the arts greeted Jane Alexander yesterday as the chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts told legislators here that art was an integral part of American culture.The cards, symbols of support for the arts, contained the message: "I support public arts funding . . . I support the NEA . . . and I supported you. Now, please support me!" They would be signed by arts supporters and mailed to politicians here and in Washington to try to shore up support for the NEA and for funding for arts programs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 1, 2003
NEW YORK -- Jane Alexander is coming home. Not to Boston, where she was born and raised. Not to Putnam County, N.Y., where she now lives. But to Washington, the city that has had the greatest impact on her career, and the city where she, in turn, wielded her greatest impact, first as an actress, and later as head of the National Endowment for the Arts. Alexander is, in fact, returning to the precise place she called home during her four years at the NEA -- the Lansburgh, the building where she had an apartment, and the building that also houses the Shakespeare Theatre, where she is starring in a production of Ibsen's Ghosts, beginning Tuesday.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1995
Although legislation pending in Congress could effectively eliminate her agency's role later this year, Jane Alexander, chairwoman of the National Endowment of the Arts, says arts supporters can count on one thing: "The artists always have the last word."On a visit to Baltimore yesterday, she said that she remains optimistic that the federal agency, which provides support to a variety of arts institutions and individuals, will survive."I am still an optimist, because the arts are life-giving . . . and the arts are needed in society more than ever," she told a luncheon session of the Association of Art Museum Directors, whose annual meeting has been taking place this week at the Walters Art Gallery.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and By Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2002
Sara Schneidman was picture editor for Time-Life Books and a "closet artist" who produced watercolors in her spare time. Then she married a bookstore owner who persuaded her that her brightly colored designs were perfect for greeting cards. The first cards were sold in 1990. Her move into stationery gave her art wide exposure, with many customers buying the cards to frame them. Now Schneidman has made another move, with her designs manufactured as rugs so bold and eye-catching that some owners design rooms around them.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1996
Photo captions for the arts education article on Pages 1E and 4E of yesterday's Today section were inadvertently reversed. The Page 1E photo features Baltimore Del. James W. Campbell and student Corey Schreier at Baltimore City College. The Page 4E photo is of student Henry Odom and NEA Chairwoman Jane Alexander.The Sun regrets the errors.A suit and tie aren't ideal garb when one is doing a grand plie, but Del. James W. Campbell was game.Down. Up. Down. Up.He, and the Baltimore City College high school students around him, were learning movements to use during battle in a Shakespearean play.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Resigned to deep congressional budget cuts, the National Endowment for the Arts has laid off nearly half its staff and is looking to cities and states for innovative ways to support arts on a local level, the agency's director said yesterday.Jane Alexander, who as director is overseeing a sweeping change in the NEA's ambitions, said the agency is also changing the categories in which it will award grants, money that has been used to support organizations ranging from Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery to the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 1, 2003
NEW YORK -- Jane Alexander is coming home. Not to Boston, where she was born and raised. Not to Putnam County, N.Y., where she now lives. But to Washington, the city that has had the greatest impact on her career, and the city where she, in turn, wielded her greatest impact, first as an actress, and later as head of the National Endowment for the Arts. Alexander is, in fact, returning to the precise place she called home during her four years at the NEA -- the Lansburgh, the building where she had an apartment, and the building that also houses the Shakespeare Theatre, where she is starring in a production of Ibsen's Ghosts, beginning Tuesday.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | January 9, 1994
Jane Alexander will speak at MHS exhibition openingJane Alexander will make her first public appearance in Maryland as chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts at the Maryland Historical Society on Thursday. The occasion is the opening of the society's 150th anniversary exhibition "You Make History" and inauguration of the MHS sesquicentennial year. Alexander, who took office Oct. 8, will be the featured speaker in a program beginning at 5:30 p.m. that includes appearances by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and state comptroller Louis L. Goldstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Sun Staff | June 4, 2000
"Command Performance: An Actress in the Theater of Politics," by Jane Alexander. PublicAffairs. 322 pages. $27.50. Maybe Jane Alexander learned her lesson too well. 0 When she was appointed head of the National Endowment for the Arts in 1993 she was a political rookie, ignorant of inside-the-Beltway survival skills. Techniques like wheedling, schmoozing, flattering, backslapping, appeasement, obfuscation and creative begging were not in her repertoire. When she left the NEA four years later, she seems to have become a pretty good student.
NEWS
September 2, 1995
IT LOOKS like the Producers Club of Maryland has hit a home run. This group of local film aficionados was organized to help bring production companies to Maryland for film shoots.As part of that effort, the group sponsored a fund-raising event at the Baltimore Museum of Art last month. The featured attraction: a preview showing of the grand prize winner from the Sundance Film Festival, "The Brothers McMullen."After the film was shown, writer-director-actor Edward Burns and co-star Maxine Bahns answered questions about this low, low-budget movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Sun Staff | June 4, 2000
"Command Performance: An Actress in the Theater of Politics," by Jane Alexander. PublicAffairs. 322 pages. $27.50. Maybe Jane Alexander learned her lesson too well. 0 When she was appointed head of the National Endowment for the Arts in 1993 she was a political rookie, ignorant of inside-the-Beltway survival skills. Techniques like wheedling, schmoozing, flattering, backslapping, appeasement, obfuscation and creative begging were not in her repertoire. When she left the NEA four years later, she seems to have become a pretty good student.
NEWS
July 14, 1997
MUSEUMS AND theater companies in Baltimore will not die as a result of the House of Representatives vote Thursday to kill the National Endowment for the Arts. That assurance cannot be given for smaller towns of the South and Midwest whose representatives conspired in the deed.Baltimore was one of the nation's arts centers before 1965, when the NEA was created, and will remain one if NEA were to vanish. Washington's major federal support for the arts, so different from European tradition, is the tax deduction for private contributions.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1996
Photo captions for the arts education article on Pages 1E and 4E of yesterday's Today section were inadvertently reversed. The Page 1E photo features Baltimore Del. James W. Campbell and student Corey Schreier at Baltimore City College. The Page 4E photo is of student Henry Odom and NEA Chairwoman Jane Alexander.The Sun regrets the errors.A suit and tie aren't ideal garb when one is doing a grand plie, but Del. James W. Campbell was game.Down. Up. Down. Up.He, and the Baltimore City College high school students around him, were learning movements to use during battle in a Shakespearean play.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Resigned to deep congressional budget cuts, the National Endowment for the Arts has laid off nearly half its staff and is looking to cities and states for innovative ways to support arts on a local level, the agency's director said yesterday.Jane Alexander, who as director is overseeing a sweeping change in the NEA's ambitions, said the agency is also changing the categories in which it will award grants, money that has been used to support organizations ranging from Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery to the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society.
NEWS
September 2, 1995
IT LOOKS like the Producers Club of Maryland has hit a home run. This group of local film aficionados was organized to help bring production companies to Maryland for film shoots.As part of that effort, the group sponsored a fund-raising event at the Baltimore Museum of Art last month. The featured attraction: a preview showing of the grand prize winner from the Sundance Film Festival, "The Brothers McMullen."After the film was shown, writer-director-actor Edward Burns and co-star Maxine Bahns answered questions about this low, low-budget movie.
NEWS
August 23, 1995
JUST when we need it comes a hopeful word on race relations in the United States. Writing in the New Republic, Jan Breslauer, who covers culture and the arts for the Los Angeles Times, describes how the politics of separatism is disappearing from the L.A. artistic scene. We can hope that development is a harbinger for the rest of the country. Here is an excerpt:"It was probably too much bad performance art that did it -- just about pushed me over the edge. After years of watching multicultural solos and theater pieces ad nauseam . . . I've arrived at a point of exquisite ambivalence.
NEWS
August 23, 1995
JUST when we need it comes a hopeful word on race relations in the United States. Writing in the New Republic, Jan Breslauer, who covers culture and the arts for the Los Angeles Times, describes how the politics of separatism is disappearing from the L.A. artistic scene. We can hope that development is a harbinger for the rest of the country. Here is an excerpt:"It was probably too much bad performance art that did it -- just about pushed me over the edge. After years of watching multicultural solos and theater pieces ad nauseam . . . I've arrived at a point of exquisite ambivalence.
NEWS
July 14, 1997
MUSEUMS AND theater companies in Baltimore will not die as a result of the House of Representatives vote Thursday to kill the National Endowment for the Arts. That assurance cannot be given for smaller towns of the South and Midwest whose representatives conspired in the deed.Baltimore was one of the nation's arts centers before 1965, when the NEA was created, and will remain one if NEA were to vanish. Washington's major federal support for the arts, so different from European tradition, is the tax deduction for private contributions.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1995
Although legislation pending in Congress could effectively eliminate her agency's role later this year, Jane Alexander, chairwoman of the National Endowment of the Arts, says arts supporters can count on one thing: "The artists always have the last word."On a visit to Baltimore yesterday, she said that she remains optimistic that the federal agency, which provides support to a variety of arts institutions and individuals, will survive."I am still an optimist, because the arts are life-giving . . . and the arts are needed in society more than ever," she told a luncheon session of the Association of Art Museum Directors, whose annual meeting has been taking place this week at the Walters Art Gallery.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Annapolis -- Yellow postcards and several hundred outspoken supporters of the arts greeted Jane Alexander yesterday as the chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts told legislators here that art was an integral part of American culture.The cards, symbols of support for the arts, contained the message: "I support public arts funding . . . I support the NEA . . . and I supported you. Now, please support me!" They would be signed by arts supporters and mailed to politicians here and in Washington to try to shore up support for the NEA and for funding for arts programs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.