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Jamie Raskin

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NEWS
January 11, 2007
Jamie Raskin Now he can show his students how it's done. Democratic Sen. Jamie Raskin, a constitutional law professor at American University, said yesterday he will bring them to Annapolis this session to see government in action. And if Raskin, a self-described "hands-on progressive," has any say in what that action includes, students will see lawmakers tackle the death penalty issue once and for all. "I hope this will be a session in which we consider seriously repealing the death penalty," said Raskin, who lives in Takoma Park.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The General Assembly has passed a law that allows caregivers of patients who use medical marijuana to possess up to an ounce of pot without being convicted of a crime. "We are expressing our belief that people who are sick should be able to access the drug without civil or criminal penalties," said Sen. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat who introduced the bill. Patients are protected under a 2011 law that allows them to use medical necessity as an "affirmative defense" in court if caught with marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
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HEALTH
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
An emotional Montel Williams joined state lawmakers Monday in Annapolis to urge the General Assembly to legalize medical marijuana. The Baltimore-born talk-show host suffers from multiple sclerosis and says he uses marijuana — and nine other medications — every day to alleviate pain. He said tearfully that traditional opiates don't work for him any longer. "I've used too many," he said. At his side were state Sens. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat, and David Brinkley, a Frederick County Republican, both cancer survivors.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller received a rare and quite public rebuke Thursday morning from two of the chamber's African-American women after he asked a visiting international delegation to come down from the gallery and assemble on the Senate floor where senators could see them. Miller delivered his  invitation to come down after the group, which was sitting in the rear balcony where many senators could not catch a glimpse of them, was introduced by Sen. Barry Glassman, R-Harford.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller received a rare and quite public rebuke Thursday morning from two of the chamber's African-American women after he asked a visiting international delegation to come down from the gallery and assemble on the Senate floor where senators could see them. Miller delivered his  invitation to come down after the group, which was sitting in the rear balcony where many senators could not catch a glimpse of them, was introduced by Sen. Barry Glassman, R-Harford.
NEWS
March 6, 2010
As Maryland's leading child-abuse prevention organization, we at The Family Tree know that Senate Bill 689 will help protect Maryland's children from maltreatment. By providing clear guidance about how a parent may discipline his or her child, the bill both teaches parents appropriate behavior and protects children from dangerous abuse. The Family Tree wholeheartedly endorses Senate Bill 689 and applauds its co-sponsors, Sens. Jamie Raskin and Richard Madaleno. Child abuse takes a tremendous toll in the United States.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The General Assembly has passed a law that allows caregivers of patients who use medical marijuana to possess up to an ounce of pot without being convicted of a crime. "We are expressing our belief that people who are sick should be able to access the drug without civil or criminal penalties," said Sen. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat who introduced the bill. Patients are protected under a 2011 law that allows them to use medical necessity as an "affirmative defense" in court if caught with marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
In between his swearing-in and attending receptions, S. Saqib Ali was changing diapers and preparing baby bottles. For his first legislative session, the Democratic delegate from Montgomery County has moved his wife and 8-month- old daughter to Annapolis, and the 31-year-old software engineer said he thinks that being part of a young family can help him connect with many of his constituents. S. Saqib Ali But Ali's distinction as the first Muslim to serve in the General Assembly has garnered the most attention, somewhat to his chagrin.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 27, 2010
Maryland lawmakers are rushing to develop a package of proposals in response to the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision striking down bans on corporate political spending - a ruling the state Senate president called "offensive" and "devastating to democracy." The 5-4 decision last week, which gives companies the right to pay for advertisements and other material in political contests, is expected to directly affect two dozen states with laws similar to the federal ban that was struck down.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
Put aside the competition between Democrats and Republicans. After hours in Annapolis, the rivalry is between senators and delegates. Scarcely had they arrived for the 2011 session last month when lawmakers launched this year's edition of a young legislative tradition: the bipartisan, inter-cameral chess tournament. Matches over the next six weeks will determine champions from each chamber, who will face off in the final. It's a competition that reminds some of their day jobs during the 90-day session.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
Put aside the competition between Democrats and Republicans. After hours in Annapolis, the rivalry is between senators and delegates. Scarcely had they arrived for the 2011 session last month when lawmakers launched this year's edition of a young legislative tradition: the bipartisan, inter-cameral chess tournament. Matches over the next six weeks will determine champions from each chamber, who will face off in the final. It's a competition that reminds some of their day jobs during the 90-day session.
HEALTH
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
An emotional Montel Williams joined state lawmakers Monday in Annapolis to urge the General Assembly to legalize medical marijuana. The Baltimore-born talk-show host suffers from multiple sclerosis and says he uses marijuana — and nine other medications — every day to alleviate pain. He said tearfully that traditional opiates don't work for him any longer. "I've used too many," he said. At his side were state Sens. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat, and David Brinkley, a Frederick County Republican, both cancer survivors.
NEWS
March 6, 2010
As Maryland's leading child-abuse prevention organization, we at The Family Tree know that Senate Bill 689 will help protect Maryland's children from maltreatment. By providing clear guidance about how a parent may discipline his or her child, the bill both teaches parents appropriate behavior and protects children from dangerous abuse. The Family Tree wholeheartedly endorses Senate Bill 689 and applauds its co-sponsors, Sens. Jamie Raskin and Richard Madaleno. Child abuse takes a tremendous toll in the United States.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 27, 2010
Maryland lawmakers are rushing to develop a package of proposals in response to the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision striking down bans on corporate political spending - a ruling the state Senate president called "offensive" and "devastating to democracy." The 5-4 decision last week, which gives companies the right to pay for advertisements and other material in political contests, is expected to directly affect two dozen states with laws similar to the federal ban that was struck down.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
Jamie Raskin Now he can show his students how it's done. Democratic Sen. Jamie Raskin, a constitutional law professor at American University, said yesterday he will bring them to Annapolis this session to see government in action. And if Raskin, a self-described "hands-on progressive," has any say in what that action includes, students will see lawmakers tackle the death penalty issue once and for all. "I hope this will be a session in which we consider seriously repealing the death penalty," said Raskin, who lives in Takoma Park.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
In between his swearing-in and attending receptions, S. Saqib Ali was changing diapers and preparing baby bottles. For his first legislative session, the Democratic delegate from Montgomery County has moved his wife and 8-month- old daughter to Annapolis, and the 31-year-old software engineer said he thinks that being part of a young family can help him connect with many of his constituents. S. Saqib Ali But Ali's distinction as the first Muslim to serve in the General Assembly has garnered the most attention, somewhat to his chagrin.
NEWS
December 26, 2013
¿     Emails shows that the State Center was approved by the O'Malley Administration before the Board of Public Works gave its final approval. ¿     While citizens testified, Senator Jamie Raskin played chess . ¿     Democrats introduce a tax that tracks the number of miles traveled in your car. ¿     Dan Bongino destroys Vinny Demarco on gun debate on TV. ¿     Three months after Red Maryland guaranteed that he wouldn't complete his term, Alex Mooney quits as Republican Party chairman . ¿     Our very own Greg Kline announced that he would run for chairman of the MDGOP.
NEWS
November 19, 2010
Now that the election is over, the tallies are in, and the numbers are shocking — and no, I'm not talking about the votes. I'm talking about the record-breaking amounts of anonymous money poured into campaign coffers by shadowy front groups like American Action Network and American Future Fund. American Action Network spent over $16 million on electioneering in 2010 but did not disclose where a single penny came from. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce spent over $31 million, but they also did not disclose their donors.
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