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Jamie Hector

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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
The ReWired for Change launch party at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park and Museum marked the official kick-off of a nonprofit started by "The Wire" star Sonja Sohn. The organization's mission is to help at-risk youth learn to make better life choices by using the HBO series itself - which was filmed in Baltimore from 2002 to 2007 - as a learning tool. Sohn - in a ruffly black chiffon cocktail dress and strappy gold high heels - looked the antithesis of her character, Detective Kima Greggs.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The very last episode of Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" will offer a taste of both New York and Baltimore. The Baltimore flavor will come by way of "The Wire. "  As the Los Angeles Times puts it, Bourdain has frequently "geeked out" about "The Wire" and welcomed any number of its actors onto his food-oriented travel show. David Simon has been on, as has Felicia "Snoop" Pearson. Bourdain has also done some writing for Simon's other HBO project, "Treme. " In the final Travel Channel episode of "No Reservations" that airs Nov. 5,  the actor who played Omar, Michael K. Williams, shows Bourdain one of his favorite spots in New York for Caribbean, a place called Gloria's in Crown Heights.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By sloane brown and sloane brown,sloane@sloanebrown.com | October 19, 2008
Hundreds of well-heeled Baltimoreans turned out for the "Steps to the Cure Inaugural Ball," where mannequin legs sprouted on the bar and on tables throughout the room, each outrageously decorated and up for auction. A trellis trimmed with shoes graced one wall; guests could pick a pair to take home. The evening's highlight was a fashion show moderated by a celebrity guest - Project Runway winner Christian Siriano. The evening was the brainchild of local plastic surgeon Dr. Larry Lickstein and his wife, Lori Lickstein, who have lived in Baltimore just two years.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
The ReWired for Change launch party at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park and Museum marked the official kick-off of a nonprofit started by "The Wire" star Sonja Sohn. The organization's mission is to help at-risk youth learn to make better life choices by using the HBO series itself - which was filmed in Baltimore from 2002 to 2007 - as a learning tool. Sohn - in a ruffly black chiffon cocktail dress and strappy gold high heels - looked the antithesis of her character, Detective Kima Greggs.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The very last episode of Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" will offer a taste of both New York and Baltimore. The Baltimore flavor will come by way of "The Wire. "  As the Los Angeles Times puts it, Bourdain has frequently "geeked out" about "The Wire" and welcomed any number of its actors onto his food-oriented travel show. David Simon has been on, as has Felicia "Snoop" Pearson. Bourdain has also done some writing for Simon's other HBO project, "Treme. " In the final Travel Channel episode of "No Reservations" that airs Nov. 5,  the actor who played Omar, Michael K. Williams, shows Bourdain one of his favorite spots in New York for Caribbean, a place called Gloria's in Crown Heights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 1, 2006
Each Sunday throughout the HBO drama's 13-week season, TV critic David Zurawik will highlight a must-see character or story element appearing in the current episode. Proposition Joe Stewart is one of television's most unforgettable characters, and that is, in no small measure, attributable to the Baltimore actor and teacher, Robert F. Chew, who plays him. Based in part on a local narcotics figure who was killed in an after-hours club in 1984, the slow-moving, smooth-talking Prop Joe more than lives up to his nickname in tonight's episode of The Wire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Click here for the gallery "The Wire: Where Are they Now?" Robert F. Chew, a 52-year-old Baltimore actor and teacher who portrayed one of television's most unforgettable characters as Proposition Joe on HBO's “The Wire,” died Thursday of apparent heart failure in his sleep at his home in Northeast Baltimore, according to Clarice Chew, his sister. Mr. Chew, who appeared in “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “The Corner,” as well as “The Wire,” also taught and mentored child and young adult actors at Baltimore's Arena Players, a troupe he stayed with as his television career blossomed in David Simon HBO series.
NEWS
By laura vozzella and laura vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Pope John Paul II still gets around. A bronze statue of the late globe-trotting pontiff had to be shipped from artist Joseph Sheppard's studio in Italy before it could be unveiled yesterday in a new prayer garden by Baltimore's Basilica. And that was just the beginning. The 7-foot piece, put in a crate and on a ship in Livorno about eight weeks ago, was supposed to go to a storage facility in or around Baltimore until installation time. But some spectacularly crossed wires led the shippers to take it instead to a North Baltimore condo.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 8, 2008
Baltimore-born R&B singer Mario lost out on one of the biggest stages in show business when he was voted off ABC's Dancing with the Stars this week. But his impressive run on the hit TV series has given the 21-year-old performer a shot at reaching new audiences - not just as a musician but also as an actor, industry analysts said yesterday. The question now is what use he makes of the newfound momentum. "Being on Dancing with the Stars opened up Mario to a whole different audience who didn't know of his talent and personality - and they got to see him in a different light than your usual R&B singer," says Biff Warren, president of The Agency, a multicultural marketing and media company that includes such clients as Alicia Keys and Jamie Hector.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 18, 2004
Nothing is more difficult in the art-meets-commerce world of episodic television than crafting a season finale without knowing if the series will be renewed. If the show is the season finale of a series that will return, a narrative that looks ahead and positions its leading characters on new paths is the way to go. But if the episode is to be the last viewers will ever see, then thematic and emotional closure are demanded. Especially if the drama is as psychologically intense as HBO's Baltimore-based crime series, The Wire, which ends its third season tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sloane brown and sloane brown,sloane@sloanebrown.com | October 19, 2008
Hundreds of well-heeled Baltimoreans turned out for the "Steps to the Cure Inaugural Ball," where mannequin legs sprouted on the bar and on tables throughout the room, each outrageously decorated and up for auction. A trellis trimmed with shoes graced one wall; guests could pick a pair to take home. The evening's highlight was a fashion show moderated by a celebrity guest - Project Runway winner Christian Siriano. The evening was the brainchild of local plastic surgeon Dr. Larry Lickstein and his wife, Lori Lickstein, who have lived in Baltimore just two years.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | December 30, 2007
Writing about the past four seasons of HBO's The Wire has been one of the great pleasures of this job. But reviewing the fifth and final season, which begins next Sunday on the premium cable channel, is more of a mixed blessing. It's not that the series has suddenly taken a drastic turn away from its epic and compelling exploration of life in a downsized Millennial America. Steeped in a dense and seething urban sociology, the Baltimore-based series is still one of the most daring dramas in the history of the medium.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | April 30, 2007
In the television crime drama The Wire, the criminal/vigilante character fans know as Omar is famous for wearing a heavy brown trench coat. He plots robberies in this Western-style duster, which flies in the wind, outlawlike, as he flees from the scenes of his various crimes. The duster tells viewers, without words, that Omar is one bad dude. It works so well that even when he wears other costumes - a loose-flowing bathrobe, perhaps, as he goes to buy cereal from a corner store - you still know this man means business.
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