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By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1993
DENTON -- Convicted killer Michael Whittlesey broke 11 years of silence yesterday with a lengthy public appeal for mercy from jurors who will decide whether he'll be executed or sentenced to life in prison for the 1982 slaying of his friend Jamie Griffin."
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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Convicted murderer Michael Whittlesey, who spent more than two years on death row for the 1982 killing of a Baltimore County teenager before the sentence was voided in favor of a life prison term, was back in court yesterday to ask that his punishment be further reduced. His attorney argued during a hearing in Baltimore County Circuit Court that a judge erred in 1984 in sentencing Whittlesey to consecutive prison terms of 10 years and 15 years for robbery and theft convictions stemming from the disappearance of 17-year-old Jamie Griffin.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
DENTON -- Nearly 11 years after Dulaney High School senior James R. "Jamie" Griffin disappeared, the man accused of killing him and burying his body in Gunpowder Falls State Park goes on trial today in Caroline County.Opening statements in the death penalty case against Michael Whittlesey should be presented to the jury after Judge J. Owen Wise rules on a handful of pretrial motions, including one from defense lawyers who contend a surreptitious tape recording of Whittlesey's conversations with a friend should not be admitted as evidence.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1997
The first thing you see when you enter the small, spotless living room of Patricia Stevenson's Dundalk rowhouse is a framed color photograph of her youngest child.That picture is almost all that remains of Bernadette Marie Stevenson Caruso. On Sept. 27, 1986, the 23-year-old woman walked out of Eastpoint Mall and vanished without a trace. No body, no bones, no car, no clothes have been found.But her family has never stopped looking."We just couldn't think of letting go -- and my children feel the same way. We owe this to Bernadette," Stevenson, 62, says.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
On the eve of a decision that could bring him the death penalty, convicted murderer Michael Whittlesey offered his first public expression of remorse yesterday for the 1982 slaying of teen-ager Jamie Griffin."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | September 27, 1992
A Joppatowne mother of four says she feels "honored" that Jamie Griffin's parents used the words she placed anonymously on a sign two years ago for a memorial stone where the youth's body was found in the Gunpowder Falls State Park.The search for the Dulaney High School senior was still under way in 1983, when Shari Beth Baldwin, 38, moved to Joppatowne and began weekly walks in the woods there. During the walks, she told her children about the missing 17-year-old pianist, warning them to be careful.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
Seeking to avoid the death penalty for their client in the 1982 murder of Jamie Griffin, lawyers for Michael Whittlesey painted the convicted killer yesterday as a childhood loner scarred by abuse, neglect and ridicule in a dysfunctional family.Whittlesey's upbringing left him without an "opportunity to develop a sense of empathy or caring," said Jeffrey Jay, a psychologist. "There's no experience of needing to take responsibility for one's acts, so impulsive or compulsive behavior or showing off is what the person resorts to."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 26, 1993
DENTON -- The fifth and final defense witness in the murder trial of Michael Whittlesey said yesterday that she saw four youths carry a "very stiff" Jamie Griffin across a road near Gunpowder Falls State Park on April 2, 1982 -- the day the 17-year-old Dulaney County High School senior disappeared.But in a tough counterattack that marked the high energy level of the trial's final days, prosecutors yesterday challenged the credibility of witness Frances V. Crue with blunt questions about her mental health.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1995
The Maryland Court of Appeals has reversed the death sentence of Michael Whittlesey, convicted of slaying a Baltimore County teen-ager in 1982 and burying his body in a park where it went undetected for eight years.Maryland's highest court ruled Thursday that Whittlesey, convicted in the murder of Jamie Griffin, should have been permitted at sentencing to present testimony from a social worker, police detectives and a private investigator to show that he grew up in an abusive family."In a capital sentencing proceeding, the United States Constitution requires that the defendant have the opportunity to present all relevant mitigating evidence," Judge Irma S. Raker wrote in a 64-page opinion.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Convicted murderer Michael Whittlesey, who spent more than two years on death row for the 1982 killing of a Baltimore County teenager before the sentence was voided in favor of a life prison term, was back in court yesterday to ask that his punishment be further reduced. His attorney argued during a hearing in Baltimore County Circuit Court that a judge erred in 1984 in sentencing Whittlesey to consecutive prison terms of 10 years and 15 years for robbery and theft convictions stemming from the disappearance of 17-year-old Jamie Griffin.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
On the eve of a decision that could bring him the death penalty, convicted murderer Michael Whittlesey offered his first public expression of remorse yesterday for the 1982 slaying of teen-ager Jamie Griffin."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
Seeking to avoid the death penalty for their client in the 1982 murder of Jamie Griffin, lawyers for Michael Whittlesey painted the convicted killer yesterday as a childhood loner scarred by abuse, neglect and ridicule in a dysfunctional family.Whittlesey's upbringing left him without an "opportunity to develop a sense of empathy or caring," said Jeffrey Jay, a psychologist. "There's no experience of needing to take responsibility for one's acts, so impulsive or compulsive behavior or showing off is what the person resorts to."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
Baltimore County prosecutors sought yesterday to restore a death sentence for the man convicted in the 1982 murder of Jamie Griffin, the Cockeysville teen-ager whose body lay undetected in a Gunpowder Falls State Park grave for eight years.But lawyers for Michael Whittlesey, whose death sentence was overturned in 1995 by the Maryland Court of Appeals, said his life should be spared, in large part because he was subjected to severe abuse while growing up.Saying that Whittlesey, now 33, was a "troubled, severely damaged child" of 18 at the time of the slaying, defense lawyer Donald E. Zaremba added, "He had no resources to deal with the insanity in his family."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1995
The Maryland Court of Appeals has reversed the death sentence of Michael Whittlesey, convicted of slaying a Baltimore County teen-ager in 1982 and burying his body in a park where it went undetected for eight years.Maryland's highest court ruled Thursday that Whittlesey, convicted in the murder of Jamie Griffin, should have been permitted at sentencing to present testimony from a social worker, police detectives and a private investigator to show that he grew up in an abusive family."In a capital sentencing proceeding, the United States Constitution requires that the defendant have the opportunity to present all relevant mitigating evidence," Judge Irma S. Raker wrote in a 64-page opinion.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | April 17, 1993
DENTON -- Convicted killer Michael Whittlesey broke 11 years of silence yesterday with a lengthy public appeal for mercy from jurors who will decide whether he'll be executed or sentenced to life in prison for the 1982 slaying of his friend Jamie Griffin."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 26, 1993
DENTON -- The fifth and final defense witness in the murder trial of Michael Whittlesey said yesterday that she saw four youths carry a "very stiff" Jamie Griffin across a road near Gunpowder Falls State Park on April 2, 1982 -- the day the 17-year-old Dulaney County High School senior disappeared.But in a tough counterattack that marked the high energy level of the trial's final days, prosecutors yesterday challenged the credibility of witness Frances V. Crue with blunt questions about her mental health.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
The parents of James R. "Jamie" Griffin still visit the woods in the Gunpowder Falls State Park where his body was found in 1990, eight years after their only child disappeared.Others also have made this pilgrimage, and have left tokens in remembrance of the gifted, 17-year-old pianist who was killed in 1982, just before his graduation from Dulaney High School.Somebody even left a neatly painted sign that reads: "May the legend of Jamie Griffin live forever in the hearts and minds of all who enter the Gunpowder River."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
DENTON -- Nearly 11 years after Dulaney High School senior James R. "Jamie" Griffin disappeared, the man accused of killing him and burying his body in Gunpowder Falls State Park goes on trial today in Caroline County.Opening statements in the death penalty case against Michael Whittlesey should be presented to the jury after Judge J. Owen Wise rules on a handful of pretrial motions, including one from defense lawyers who contend a surreptitious tape recording of Whittlesey's conversations with a friend should not be admitted as evidence.
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