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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | May 4, 2007
While growing up in Richmond, Va., Bob Deans learned the history of the Jamestown settlement as most schoolchildren in Britain and the United States did. "A few great men came here [in 1607] and built Jamestown," says Deans, recounting the drill, "and in the process, built this great country." It's a simple enough story, one that no doubt comforted generations of Americans and Brits, if only for its clarity. Queen Elizabeth II herself heard it when she came to Jamestown for the first time 50 years ago, to celebrate the 350th anniversary of its founding.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 14, 2014
Rose Brier became a stakes winner for the first time when he captured the $60,000 Bert Allen Stakes, the sixth in a series of Virginia-bred races contested at Laurel Park on Saturday because of the shuttering of Colonial Downs this summer. Rose Brier, a Mizzen Mast offspring trained by Jane Cibelli and ridden by Trevor McCarthy, paid $5.20 as the favorite in the 11/16-mile test over firm turf. The 5-year-old beat second choice Hard Enough by 31/4 lengths, with Dannhauser finishing a nose back in third.
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NEWS
February 4, 2005
JAMESTOWN, Va.-- The Church of England has agreed to allow researchers using radar to look beneath two churches for remains that could determine whether a skeleton found at Jamestown is that of one of the colony's founders, scientists said this week. Researchers who excavated the site of a 400-year-old fort at Jamestown want to know whether a skeleton discovered there in 2003 is that of Capt. Bartholomew Gosnold, captain of one of the three ships that carried settlers from England. To do so, they need to find the graves of Gosnold's sister and niece, who were buried in two churches in Suffolk, England, and conduct DNA analyses.
EXPLORE
July 26, 2012
The IronBirds came through with their fourth straight victory Thursday night, beating the visiting Jamestown Jammers, 6-2. The contest was called complete after the bottom of the eighth inning when heavy rains started at Ripken Stadium. Will Howard led the IronBirds' offense, going 2-for-3 with two RBIs. Anthony Vega scored two runs in the victory, while teammates Lucas Herbst and Christian Walker each posted one run and one RBI. Aberdeen starter Juan Guzman (2-0) picked up his second win of the season, surrendering two earned runs on three hits, striking out 11 and allowing one walk over six innings.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | January 8, 1995
Looking out for the environment is no longer in vogue in this era of deconstructing big government. The costs are considered too great, the regulatory burden too onerous and oppressive.While criticisms of certain environmental regulations may have merit, returning to an era of ignoring the ecological consequences of human development would be disastrous. All one must do is look at the history of Jamestown, Va., the earliest English settlement that survived in the New World, to understand that disregarding the environment ultimately imperils our existence.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 1996
JAMESTOWN, Va. - After two years of digging that has yielded 90,000 artifacts, archaeologists searching for the original English settlement at Jamestown are close to saying for sure that they have located the footprint of the first fort.They're so close that Gov. George Allen has promised to make a "grand announcement" Wednesday on the island, according to officials of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, the group that owns the Jamestown property on which the excavation has been conducted.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 1996
The first successful English settlement in what is now the United States got off to an unsteady start at a swampy island in a broad tidal river in 1607.The 104 settlers of the Virginia Company named it Jamestown, after the sovereign whom more than half of them would die serving within a few months.All traces of the fort, however, had been lost for more than two centuries.The log fort had burned a year after it was built. Remains of the wall, along with any weapons, ceramics and other artifacts, were thought to have been washed away by the James River.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
For the fourth consecutive year, 13-year-old Heather Schulman visited historic Jamestown, Va., but this time she didn't set foot outside her Arnold community.On Friday, Heather and 19 other Severn River Junior High School students watched a satellite broadcast of archaeologists digging the Colonial settlement from the comfortable confines of the AVCOM Center at Anne Arundel Community College."This is better because we're watching it live and we can see everything right from here," said Heather, an eighth-grader.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
After 71 days of rowing and sailing in a 17th-century-style wooden boat, the crew of the Capt. John Smith shallop are scheduled to arrive in Havre de Grace this morning, at Tydings Park near the Promenade. Havre de Grace will celebrate the boat's arrival with a welcome ceremony for the 12-member crew and a proclamation from the mayor. The shallop has been traveling up the Chesapeake, powered by wind and muscle along more than 800 miles into rivers and along shorelines. Sultana Projects Inc., a nonprofit organization based in Chestertown, organized the voyage to inaugurate the Capt.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | November 13, 2003
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Special agents from the National Park Service's visitor and resource protection branch are investigating a catastrophic flood that inflicted $11.4 million in damage to the historic Jamestown archaeological collection during Hurricane Isabel. Enveloped by 5 feet of water during the Sept. 18 storm, the famous collection of more than 900,000 artifacts represents one of the nation's most important links to its beginnings in the first permanent English settlement of 1607.
EXPLORE
July 29, 2011
The Aberdeen IronBirds fell on the road Friday night, 5-0, to the Jamestown Jammers. Aberdeen, which is in the cellar of the New York-Penn League's McNamara Division at 13-28 on the year, returns home Saturday for a 7:05 contest with the Mahoning Valley Crosscutters. Aberdeen's best scoring opportunity came in the third when Dudley Leonora led off with a single, stole second and Glynn Davis followed with a one-out single that moved Leonora to third. After Sammie Starr walked to load the bases with one out, Mychal Givens grounded into an inning-ending double play.
NEWS
July 28, 2011
The Aberdeen IronBirds' Wednesday-night match up was decided in the fifth frame, during which the host-team Jamestown Jammers exploded for five runs, putting themselves far enough ahead to hand the guests an 8-3 defeat. The loss dropped Aberdeen to 12-27 on the season, and through Wednesday, the IronBirds were at the bottom of the New York-Penn League's four-team McNamara Division, 7.5 gams behind third-place Hudson Valley. Trailing 1-0 heading into the fourth frame, Aberdeen tied things up 1-1. After Joe Velleggia and Connor Narron started the inning with back-to-back strikeouts, Austin Knight poked a two-out single through the infield, and Adam Davis followed by taking a pitch off his body.
NEWS
By Brittany Santarpio, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
Last week, TripAdvisor named Williamsburg, Va., as the top place for families to discover. The Virginia's Historic Triangle includes Colonial Williamsburg, Busch Gardens Amusement Park and Jamestown Settlement. Those wanting to get a jump on visiting the area can head into the past this weekend when history repeats itself as hundreds of re-enactors charge the battlefield during Jamestown Settlement's annual "Military Through the Ages. " Pseudo soldiers guard enemy lines as they depict wars from the 18th century to today.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
After 71 days of rowing and sailing in a 17th-century-style wooden boat, the crew of the Capt. John Smith shallop are scheduled to arrive in Havre de Grace this morning, at Tydings Park near the Promenade. Havre de Grace will celebrate the boat's arrival with a welcome ceremony for the 12-member crew and a proclamation from the mayor. The shallop has been traveling up the Chesapeake, powered by wind and muscle along more than 800 miles into rivers and along shorelines. Sultana Projects Inc., a nonprofit organization based in Chestertown, organized the voyage to inaugurate the Capt.
NEWS
May 6, 2007
The queen, who first visited America's first permanent English settlement 50 years ago, returned last week for the commemoration of Jamestown's 400th anniversary and praised the two countries' continuing "special relationship" and the cultural changes that have occurred in both through her long reign. ?The melting-pot metaphor captures one of the great strengths of your country and is an inspiration to others around the world as we face the continuing social challenges ahead.? Queen Elizabeth II
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | May 4, 2007
CLARIFICATION An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about Queen Elizabeth II's visit should have described Jamestown, founded in1607, as the first permanent English colony in America. The "Lost Colony" of Roanoke was founded two decades earlier but did not last. RICHMOND, Va. -- The rain cleared for just a moment, it seemed, and there she was, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, looking every bit the part.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- America's "first lady," who lived at England's first permanent settlement in North America nearly four centuries ago, is spending the holidays at the Smithsonian Institution, where scientists are carefully examining her bones for traces of disease.She was given the title "first lady" by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, which owns the Jamestown., Va., site and recently announced that it had identified her remains as those of a "Mistress Forrest," wife of "Thomas Forrest, Gentleman," one of the first colonists to come to what is now the United States.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2004
JAMESTOWN, Va. -- Twelve years after colonists landed here in 1607 to establish the first permanent English settlement in North America, Jamestown remained a small, struggling enterprise on the banks of the James River. No one in August 1619 understood the consequences of joining a few hundred white, European, mostly English settlers with what Colony secretary John Rolfe famously described as "20. and odd negroes." Only a few, fragmented records of these newcomers survive, mostly in the form of early census documents that list the first Africans by race, occupation and on several tantalizingly concrete occasions by name.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | May 4, 2007
While growing up in Richmond, Va., Bob Deans learned the history of the Jamestown settlement as most schoolchildren in Britain and the United States did. "A few great men came here [in 1607] and built Jamestown," says Deans, recounting the drill, "and in the process, built this great country." It's a simple enough story, one that no doubt comforted generations of Americans and Brits, if only for its clarity. Queen Elizabeth II herself heard it when she came to Jamestown for the first time 50 years ago, to celebrate the 350th anniversary of its founding.
TRAVEL
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
JAMESTOWN, VA. My daughter, Isabelle, loves great stories -- especially the ones that are full of gloom. Her favorite movie scene is from Cinderella, when the main character's stepsisters rip apart her lovely pink dress just before the ball, followed closely by one from The Little Mermaid, when Ariel despairs after her father destroys all the knick-knacks the young mermaid collected from the forbidden human world.
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