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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
A "badly flawed" original budget and a failure at NASA headquarters to spot the problems have allowed a $1.5 billion cost overrun and a year's delay in the agency's project to build its most powerful telescope yet, according to an independent panel. In a report released Wednesday, the panel said the James Webb Space Telescope project — planned for launch in 2014 as the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope — will likely cost $6.5 billion when all the bills are in, and is unlikely to launch until September 2015 at the earliest.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center last month, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and space agency Administrator Charles Bolden stressed the importance of maintaining budget support for the James Webb Space Telescope, keeping it on track for a 2018 launch. Sticking to that schedule is the job of the Webb telescope's project manager, Bill Ochs, who, from his office on the Greenbelt campus, oversees all of the moving parts slated to come together and be blasted into space in 41/2 years. It's a complicated job, Ochs acknowledged, but since new development and spending plans were approved three years ago for the delayed and over-budget project, things have been running smoothly.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center last month, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and space agency Administrator Charles Bolden stressed the importance of maintaining budget support for the James Webb Space Telescope, keeping it on track for a 2018 launch. Sticking to that schedule is the job of the Webb telescope's project manager, Bill Ochs, who, from his office on the Greenbelt campus, oversees all of the moving parts slated to come together and be blasted into space in 41/2 years. It's a complicated job, Ochs acknowledged, but since new development and spending plans were approved three years ago for the delayed and over-budget project, things have been running smoothly.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
EDITOR'S NOTE: What follows is a text-only version of this Hidden Maryland story. To view the full feature version, which includes photos, video and graphics, go here .  Once you've passed through a vestibule, an air shower, a changing room and three more doors separating the grime of life from the "clean room" where NASA is building the James Webb Space Telescope, a gust of 72-degree filtered air greets your face. That's the only exposed skin allowed inside. To prepare for the room, shoe-covering booties and a hair net go on first.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, pete.pichaske@gmail.com | April 26, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them — and encourages others to do so as well. Kalirai, 35, is an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. For two years, he worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history, and for the past 2 1/2 years has been the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful than Hubble.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 24, 2012
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is holding a family event Wednesday night to teach middle-school-age children about the James Webb Space Telescope. Visitors will learn about the telescope from experts who work on it, and then will be able to build a simple telescope they can take home. The event is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Goddard visitors center in Greenbelt. The Webb telescope is slated to launch around 2018.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 16, 2012
Show children how big the universe is at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. Children and their families can get a glimpse of plans for the James Webb Space Telescope and its research into galaxy formation and star life cycles. Children will get to see how the telescope will explore using infrared light. The “Sunday Experiment” event is Sunday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Goddard Center's Visitor Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road. Find more information on the center's website .
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 16, 2012
Have questions about space and the James Webb Space Telescope? John Mather, a Nobel laureate and scientist working on the telescope, will answer them on Twitter tomorrow. The telescope is slated for a 2018 launch and is seeking to find the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang, determine how they have evolved, observe star formation and investigate potential for life in other planetary systems. Tweet with the hashtag #JWSTscience and follow @NASAWebbTelescp for answers from 2-3 p.m.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them - and encourages others to do so, as well. For two years, Kalirai, an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history. Now he is the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful. "Astronomy is my passion, and the James Webb Space Telescope is the most exciting astronomy project ever," said Kalirai, 35, of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
EDITOR'S NOTE: What follows is a text-only version of this Hidden Maryland story. To view the full feature version, which includes photos, video and graphics, go here .  Once you've passed through a vestibule, an air shower, a changing room and three more doors separating the grime of life from the "clean room" where NASA is building the James Webb Space Telescope, a gust of 72-degree filtered air greets your face. That's the only exposed skin allowed inside. To prepare for the room, shoe-covering booties and a hair net go on first.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them - and encourages others to do so, as well. For two years, Kalirai, an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history. Now he is the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful. "Astronomy is my passion, and the James Webb Space Telescope is the most exciting astronomy project ever," said Kalirai, 35, of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, pete.pichaske@gmail.com | April 26, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them — and encourages others to do so as well. Kalirai, 35, is an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. For two years, he worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history, and for the past 2 1/2 years has been the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful than Hubble.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Room 110 of Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy bears a special name on the placard outside: Rocket Room. Inside, tiny screws, metal clamps, screwdrivers, power drills and colored zip ties cover tables and shelves, the remnants of four years of work building a 24-foot-long tube scientists will soon blast into space. A team of doctoral students and scientists is fine-tuning a rocket payload that will carry a telescope 250 miles above the earth's atmosphere.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 24, 2012
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is holding a family event Wednesday night to teach middle-school-age children about the James Webb Space Telescope. Visitors will learn about the telescope from experts who work on it, and then will be able to build a simple telescope they can take home. The event is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Goddard visitors center in Greenbelt. The Webb telescope is slated to launch around 2018.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 16, 2012
Have questions about space and the James Webb Space Telescope? John Mather, a Nobel laureate and scientist working on the telescope, will answer them on Twitter tomorrow. The telescope is slated for a 2018 launch and is seeking to find the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang, determine how they have evolved, observe star formation and investigate potential for life in other planetary systems. Tweet with the hashtag #JWSTscience and follow @NASAWebbTelescp for answers from 2-3 p.m.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
What lies at the center of that giant ball of gas we call Jupiter? When you cut through the incredibly dense atmosphere of Venus, what's happening on the planet surface? These are the questions that dance in the mind of Johns Hopkins University student Jessica Noviello. For her, they are not the idle musings of a child but a calling, pulling her life's path into space. "To think of being part of a mission that might answer things people have been wondering about for decades, that's very alluring," says Noviello, a sophomore from Smithtown, N.Y. Hopkins professors say this curiosity makes Noviello the perfect trailblazer for the university's new minor in space science and engineering.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
Tuesday's announcement that Hopkins astronomer Adam G. Riess will share this year's Nobel Prize in physics acknowledges his huge contribution to scientific knowledge. From the study of giant exploding stars millions of light-years from Earth, Mr. Riess and his colleagues, Saul Perlmutter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and Brian P. Schmidt of the Australian National University in Australia, deduced the astonishing hypothesis that our universe is being violently blown apart by an immensely powerful, previously unsuspected force.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
A full-size model of the James Webb Space Telescope, the tennis-court-length receiver that will be assembled in and operated from Maryland, is on display at the Inner Harbor through Oct. 26. "Webb will find the first galaxies in the universe," said NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. at the unveiling at the Maryland Science Center on Friday. The orbiting telescope, recently at the center of budget battles in Washington, will be the "most powerful that NASA has ever built," he said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 16, 2012
Show children how big the universe is at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. Children and their families can get a glimpse of plans for the James Webb Space Telescope and its research into galaxy formation and star life cycles. Children will get to see how the telescope will explore using infrared light. The “Sunday Experiment” event is Sunday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Goddard Center's Visitor Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road. Find more information on the center's website .
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
A full-size model of the James Webb Space Telescope, the tennis-court-length receiver that will be assembled in and operated from Maryland, is on display at the Inner Harbor through Oct. 26. "Webb will find the first galaxies in the universe," said NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. at the unveiling at the Maryland Science Center on Friday. The orbiting telescope, recently at the center of budget battles in Washington, will be the "most powerful that NASA has ever built," he said.
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