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By Michael Pakenham | December 29, 2002
The New Yorker Book of Literary Cartoons, edited by Bob Mankoff. Washington Square, 112 pages, $12 softbound. History's pre-eminent purveyor of nonpolitical cartoons, The New Yorker, lately has been spinning out themed collections of those gems of drawing and wit, many chosen and edited by Mankoff, the magazine's cartoon editor since 1997. All are entertaining, and some irresistibly provoking -- such is the nature of the form and of The New Yorker's legendary capacity to inspire, choose and publish consistent excellence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Buckley and Christopher Buckley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2003
The Thurber Letters: The Wit, Wisdom, and Surprising Life of James Thurber, edited by Harrison Kinney with Rosemary Thurber. Simon & Schuster. 798 pages. $40. It is 104 here today," James Thurber wrote to a friend from Hollywood in 1939, "but the papers in this godawful hellhole proclaim 'Angelenos Suffer no Discomfort.' That would be too bad. I hope the sons of bitches burn up." What could be more refreshing than a Great East Coast Literary Figure draining his spleen beneath the remunerative palms?
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NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 17, 1993
THE SENATE has passed a bill requiring Washington lobbyists to register. Now we'll know how many there are.Maybe. There already is a law requiring them to register, and nobody knows how many there are. The range of estimates is wide. President Clinton recently used the figure 80,000. Where did that come from? James Thurber made it up.Now that's not James Thurber the late humorist and cartoonist. It is James Thurber the professor of government at American University. In 1991, Jeffrey Birnbaum, a Wall Street Journal reporter, was doing an article on lobbyists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 29, 2002
The New Yorker Book of Literary Cartoons, edited by Bob Mankoff. Washington Square, 112 pages, $12 softbound. History's pre-eminent purveyor of nonpolitical cartoons, The New Yorker, lately has been spinning out themed collections of those gems of drawing and wit, many chosen and edited by Mankoff, the magazine's cartoon editor since 1997. All are entertaining, and some irresistibly provoking -- such is the nature of the form and of The New Yorker's legendary capacity to inspire, choose and publish consistent excellence.
NEWS
June 16, 1995
A RECENT biography of Harold Ross, the eccentric founder and first editor of the New Yorker, prompted us to cull these passages from James Thurber's 1959 memoir, "The Years with Ross":Of their first meeting in 1927, two years after the launching of the magazine, Thurber wrote, "I told [Ross] I wanted to write, and he snarled, 'Writers are a dime a dozen, Thurber. What I want is an editor. I can't find editors. Nobody grows up. Do you know English?' I said I thought I knew English, and this started him off on a subject with which I was to become intensely familiar.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | October 24, 1994
REMEMBER LAUGHTER: A LIFE OF JAMES THURBER. By Neil A. Grauer. University of Nebraska Press. Illustrated. Index. 204 pages. $20.SOME OF the very best American prose is the work of humorists who began as their careers as journalists -- the best, of course, is Mark Twain. Second or third on the list would have to be James Thurber, the subject of this exemplary little biography by Baltimore writer, Neil Grauer.Even devoted Thurber lovers who have read other biographies of him (the last one was published nearly 20 years ago)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 30, 1994
'A Thurber Carnival' begins three-weekend runLiberty Showcase Theatre's production of "A Thurber Carnival" -- a collection of humorous sketches by James Thurber -- begins a three-weekend run at Winand Elementary School, 8301 Scotts Level Road, on Friday.Under the direction of Allan Dale 3rd, the cast of 12 features Roman Gusso and Barbara Franklin in the favorite Thurber roles of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mitty. Curtain times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., with matinees next Sunday and Feb. 13 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8. For further information call (410)
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | July 5, 1992
When I arrived at the office last Wednesday, I found this message from a friend waiting in my voice mail:"The sky is falling! The sky is falling! Call me the minute you get in."It's funny. But right away I knew the message referred to the earthquake in New York. The one that occurred when it was announced: "Vanity Fair's Tina Brown to Take Over at the New Yorker."It was stunning news. And as word spread that the 38-year-old, British-born Vanity Fair editor -- the one who last year featured a naked, very pregnant Demi Moore on the magazine's cover -- was to take up the reins at the venerable New Yorker, it quickly became the Talk of the Town.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Buckley and Christopher Buckley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2003
The Thurber Letters: The Wit, Wisdom, and Surprising Life of James Thurber, edited by Harrison Kinney with Rosemary Thurber. Simon & Schuster. 798 pages. $40. It is 104 here today," James Thurber wrote to a friend from Hollywood in 1939, "but the papers in this godawful hellhole proclaim 'Angelenos Suffer no Discomfort.' That would be too bad. I hope the sons of bitches burn up." What could be more refreshing than a Great East Coast Literary Figure draining his spleen beneath the remunerative palms?
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | December 8, 1994
James Thurber, born 100 years ago today was destined to be odd. That he was funny, too, was merely a bonus.So begins a breezy new biography of the famed writer and cartoonist, "Remember Laughter" (University of Nebraska Press), by Baltimore writer Neil A. Grauer. Timed to coincide with the centenary of Thurber's birth, the book arrives in stores just ahead of a movie about the famed Algonquin Round Table called "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle."This sudden interest in the first generation of New Yorker writers and wits -- which included not only Thurber, but E.B. White, and those of who gathered to dine and dish at the Algonquin Hotel, such as Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Alexander Woollcott -- doesn't surprise Mr. Grauer.
NEWS
June 16, 1995
A RECENT biography of Harold Ross, the eccentric founder and first editor of the New Yorker, prompted us to cull these passages from James Thurber's 1959 memoir, "The Years with Ross":Of their first meeting in 1927, two years after the launching of the magazine, Thurber wrote, "I told [Ross] I wanted to write, and he snarled, 'Writers are a dime a dozen, Thurber. What I want is an editor. I can't find editors. Nobody grows up. Do you know English?' I said I thought I knew English, and this started him off on a subject with which I was to become intensely familiar.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | December 8, 1994
James Thurber, born 100 years ago today was destined to be odd. That he was funny, too, was merely a bonus.So begins a breezy new biography of the famed writer and cartoonist, "Remember Laughter" (University of Nebraska Press), by Baltimore writer Neil A. Grauer. Timed to coincide with the centenary of Thurber's birth, the book arrives in stores just ahead of a movie about the famed Algonquin Round Table called "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle."This sudden interest in the first generation of New Yorker writers and wits -- which included not only Thurber, but E.B. White, and those of who gathered to dine and dish at the Algonquin Hotel, such as Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Alexander Woollcott -- doesn't surprise Mr. Grauer.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | October 24, 1994
REMEMBER LAUGHTER: A LIFE OF JAMES THURBER. By Neil A. Grauer. University of Nebraska Press. Illustrated. Index. 204 pages. $20.SOME OF the very best American prose is the work of humorists who began as their careers as journalists -- the best, of course, is Mark Twain. Second or third on the list would have to be James Thurber, the subject of this exemplary little biography by Baltimore writer, Neil Grauer.Even devoted Thurber lovers who have read other biographies of him (the last one was published nearly 20 years ago)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 30, 1994
'A Thurber Carnival' begins three-weekend runLiberty Showcase Theatre's production of "A Thurber Carnival" -- a collection of humorous sketches by James Thurber -- begins a three-weekend run at Winand Elementary School, 8301 Scotts Level Road, on Friday.Under the direction of Allan Dale 3rd, the cast of 12 features Roman Gusso and Barbara Franklin in the favorite Thurber roles of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mitty. Curtain times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., with matinees next Sunday and Feb. 13 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8. For further information call (410)
NEWS
By James H. Bready | January 30, 1994
With its latest -- and biggest -- issue, Antietam Review enters its second decade. Based in Hagerstown, the Review is Maryland's only serious, nationally circulated literary magazine.This time it publishes eight short stories, the work of 16 poets (one by a Romanian, Iona Ieronim, in translation) and 21 black-and-white photographs. There are interviews with Diane Wolkstein, storyteller, and Joyce Riser Kornblatt, professor of creative writing at the University of Maryland College Park.Still basking in the glow of its inclusion in a recent "Best 50 Litmags From 50 States" listing, Antietam Review has received close to 500 verbal and photographic works from the United States and abroad for its 1994 issue.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 17, 1993
THE SENATE has passed a bill requiring Washington lobbyists to register. Now we'll know how many there are.Maybe. There already is a law requiring them to register, and nobody knows how many there are. The range of estimates is wide. President Clinton recently used the figure 80,000. Where did that come from? James Thurber made it up.Now that's not James Thurber the late humorist and cartoonist. It is James Thurber the professor of government at American University. In 1991, Jeffrey Birnbaum, a Wall Street Journal reporter, was doing an article on lobbyists.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | January 30, 1994
With its latest -- and biggest -- issue, Antietam Review enters its second decade. Based in Hagerstown, the Review is Maryland's only serious, nationally circulated literary magazine.This time it publishes eight short stories, the work of 16 poets (one by a Romanian, Iona Ieronim, in translation) and 21 black-and-white photographs. There are interviews with Diane Wolkstein, storyteller, and Joyce Riser Kornblatt, professor of creative writing at the University of Maryland College Park.Still basking in the glow of its inclusion in a recent "Best 50 Litmags From 50 States" listing, Antietam Review has received close to 500 verbal and photographic works from the United States and abroad for its 1994 issue.
NEWS
February 14, 1995
FOR VALENTINE'S Day, some reflections on love and romance:* "Love affairs have always greatly interested me, but I do not greatly care for them in books or moving pictures. In a love affair I wish to be the hero, with no audience present."-- Edgar Watson Howe* "Love is much nicer to be in than an automobile accident, a tight girdle, a higher tax bracket, or a holding pattern over Philadelphia."-- Judith Viorst* "Love is the bewilderment which overtakes one person on account of another."-- James Thurber and E. B. White* "The charm of kissing, to a genuinely civilized man, lies very largely in the fact that it is not everywhere and always convenient . . . his fancy delights to play with the contrast between the girl's aloof dignity in public and her somewhat exigent willingness behind the door.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | July 5, 1992
When I arrived at the office last Wednesday, I found this message from a friend waiting in my voice mail:"The sky is falling! The sky is falling! Call me the minute you get in."It's funny. But right away I knew the message referred to the earthquake in New York. The one that occurred when it was announced: "Vanity Fair's Tina Brown to Take Over at the New Yorker."It was stunning news. And as word spread that the 38-year-old, British-born Vanity Fair editor -- the one who last year featured a naked, very pregnant Demi Moore on the magazine's cover -- was to take up the reins at the venerable New Yorker, it quickly became the Talk of the Town.
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