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By Zap2it.com | December 20, 2003
Emmy winner Betty White will join the cast of The Practice for a three-episode arc later this season. White will play a resident of Alan Shore's (James Spader) hometown, where he returns to defend a childhood buddy in a murder case. This is a rare foray into drama for White, whose TV work includes the Mary Tyler Moore, The Golden Girls and guest appearances on The John Larroquette Show. She has appeared in a handful of dramas - most recently 1999's The Story of Us - and guest-starred on shows ranging from St. Elsewhere to Everwood.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 8, 2008
The ABC lawyer drama Boston Legal ends its run tonight with a two-hour finale focused on the characters of Alan Shore (James Spader) and Denny Crane (William Shatner) - and that's as it should be. I am not sure this series had soul, but they certainly formed the heart of it. In so doing, they became one of the more intelligent, engaging, off-beat and enduring professional couples on TV. Beyond unique and brilliant performances by Shatner and Spader, the series also boasted some of the finest writing on network TV, thanks to creator and executive producer David E. Kelley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Elena Fernandez and Maria Elena Fernandez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 10, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - The day before James Spader won an Emmy for his portrayal of Alan Shore, the morally dubious lawyer on The Practice, the actor was at the Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden at the University of California, Los Angeles, admiring the statues - especially the female forms. "Look at the beautiful curve of her back, right at the base of her spine," he said, noticing a dancer at the top of Robert Graham's Dance Columns. "It's the most perfect curve in nature." James Spader, network TV star: To anyone familiar with the 44-year-old actor and his work, it sounds almost absurd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Elena Fernandez and Maria Elena Fernandez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 10, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - The day before James Spader won an Emmy for his portrayal of Alan Shore, the morally dubious lawyer on The Practice, the actor was at the Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden at the University of California, Los Angeles, admiring the statues - especially the female forms. "Look at the beautiful curve of her back, right at the base of her spine," he said, noticing a dancer at the top of Robert Graham's Dance Columns. "It's the most perfect curve in nature." James Spader, network TV star: To anyone familiar with the 44-year-old actor and his work, it sounds almost absurd.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 11, 1997
Well, excuse me, but any film calling itself "Keys to Tulsa" ought to be shot in the great state of Oklahoma, not in the overexposed city of Dallas, Texas, by the crew leftover from "Walker, Texas Ranger."So that's one strike. Here's Strike Two: "Keys to Tulsa."A not-good melodrama that's poorly acted and difficult to follow, the movie is also too long and violent. But it does have one aspect worth noting: James Spader as Elvis.Not Elvis-Elvis, but an Elvis influencee, a dope dealer married to a disinherited rich girl who is currently blackmailing an oil-tycoon pervert for the murder of a black prostitute.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 8, 2008
The ABC lawyer drama Boston Legal ends its run tonight with a two-hour finale focused on the characters of Alan Shore (James Spader) and Denny Crane (William Shatner) - and that's as it should be. I am not sure this series had soul, but they certainly formed the heart of it. In so doing, they became one of the more intelligent, engaging, off-beat and enduring professional couples on TV. Beyond unique and brilliant performances by Shatner and Spader, the series also boasted some of the finest writing on network TV, thanks to creator and executive producer David E. Kelley.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 29, 1994
"StarGate" is a loony-tune beamed down from the Planet of the Bad Movies. But what's so dispiriting about it isn't its goofiness, but its smallness. However awful "Dune" was, it offered immense subversive pleasure in the scale, the density, the depth of its folly!Folly writ small, alas, is only stupidity; and inside "StarGate" there's a small, stupid movie struggling to get out. For one thing, when we have short-circuited the universe and landed on its other side, on some distant planet in a distant solar system, we find ourselves in a pretty tiny pea-patch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 27, 1992
Stories set in New Orleans inevitably have one great thing going for them: New Orleans.And "Storyville" revels in its New Orleansness, loving the drippy moss and the gelid, murky swamps surrounding the most baroque, decadent and delightful city in America; it loves the tawdry sleaze of the French Quarter and the remote mansions of the town's more genteel boroughs.The city's singularity is absolutely appropriate to the movie. In fact it is the movie. It's one of those complex films noirs tracking three generations worth of deceit, an illegally gotten fortune, a suicide that may be murder, a murder that is definitely a murder, porn, corrupt cops, duck hunting and aikido.
FEATURES
October 26, 1990
WE'RE INTO another cycle, a small but good one, the romantic film. It may have begun with ''When Harry Met Sally.'' It continued with ''Pretty Woman'' and ''Ghost.''It is certainly continuing with ''White Palace,'' and if the cycle continues to produce titles as good as this one, let it move along.''White Palace'' plays like a '30s romantic comedy, save for the language and the sex. The '30s movies were never this obvious, never this frank, but then a lot of comedy has passed under that bridge.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 18, 2002
Secretary, the story of a masochistic secretary (Maggie Gyllenhaal) who discovers true love only when her lawyer-boss (James Spader) spanks her, is the refined arthouse equivalent of Hollywood low comedies that win laughs and critical praise for diving into far-out areas like incest and bestiality. The advance raves for Secretary are tantamount to dares: Love this movie, they command us, or be revealed as a priss or a coward. They're like the kudos for all those terrible Farrelly Brothers movies, like Me, Myself and Irene and Say It Isn't So, that say: Applaud this film or be dubbed a snob or a sourpuss.
FEATURES
By Zap2it.com | December 20, 2003
Emmy winner Betty White will join the cast of The Practice for a three-episode arc later this season. White will play a resident of Alan Shore's (James Spader) hometown, where he returns to defend a childhood buddy in a murder case. This is a rare foray into drama for White, whose TV work includes the Mary Tyler Moore, The Golden Girls and guest appearances on The John Larroquette Show. She has appeared in a handful of dramas - most recently 1999's The Story of Us - and guest-starred on shows ranging from St. Elsewhere to Everwood.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 18, 2002
Secretary, the story of a masochistic secretary (Maggie Gyllenhaal) who discovers true love only when her lawyer-boss (James Spader) spanks her, is the refined arthouse equivalent of Hollywood low comedies that win laughs and critical praise for diving into far-out areas like incest and bestiality. The advance raves for Secretary are tantamount to dares: Love this movie, they command us, or be revealed as a priss or a coward. They're like the kudos for all those terrible Farrelly Brothers movies, like Me, Myself and Irene and Say It Isn't So, that say: Applaud this film or be dubbed a snob or a sourpuss.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 14, 1997
Sending up today's insurance-driven medicine racket is tantamount to shooting fish in a barrel. As the nexus of so many charged themes -- life, death, greed, vanity and a surfeit of litigation -- the hospital seems sent straight from central casting as the ideal institutional symbol for most of our societal ills."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 11, 1997
Well, excuse me, but any film calling itself "Keys to Tulsa" ought to be shot in the great state of Oklahoma, not in the overexposed city of Dallas, Texas, by the crew leftover from "Walker, Texas Ranger."So that's one strike. Here's Strike Two: "Keys to Tulsa."A not-good melodrama that's poorly acted and difficult to follow, the movie is also too long and violent. But it does have one aspect worth noting: James Spader as Elvis.Not Elvis-Elvis, but an Elvis influencee, a dope dealer married to a disinherited rich girl who is currently blackmailing an oil-tycoon pervert for the murder of a black prostitute.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | October 31, 1994
Kurt Russell has been playing the Hollywood game for 28 of his 43 years, and he says he can smell a loser movie the minute he walks on a set.Before he walked onto the set of "StarGate," the sci-fi thriller that opened Friday, he said he was filled with the usual amount of anxiety that comes with making any film. But there was added tension because it was a big-budget movie with special effects."The script doesn't tell you what the special effects are really going to be like or how much they're going to spend on those effects," the actor said.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 29, 1994
"StarGate" is a loony-tune beamed down from the Planet of the Bad Movies. But what's so dispiriting about it isn't its goofiness, but its smallness. However awful "Dune" was, it offered immense subversive pleasure in the scale, the density, the depth of its folly!Folly writ small, alas, is only stupidity; and inside "StarGate" there's a small, stupid movie struggling to get out. For one thing, when we have short-circuited the universe and landed on its other side, on some distant planet in a distant solar system, we find ourselves in a pretty tiny pea-patch.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | October 31, 1994
Kurt Russell has been playing the Hollywood game for 28 of his 43 years, and he says he can smell a loser movie the minute he walks on a set.Before he walked onto the set of "StarGate," the sci-fi thriller that opened Friday, he said he was filled with the usual amount of anxiety that comes with making any film. But there was added tension because it was a big-budget movie with special effects."The script doesn't tell you what the special effects are really going to be like or how much they're going to spend on those effects," the actor said.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 14, 1997
Sending up today's insurance-driven medicine racket is tantamount to shooting fish in a barrel. As the nexus of so many charged themes -- life, death, greed, vanity and a surfeit of litigation -- the hospital seems sent straight from central casting as the ideal institutional symbol for most of our societal ills."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 27, 1992
Stories set in New Orleans inevitably have one great thing going for them: New Orleans.And "Storyville" revels in its New Orleansness, loving the drippy moss and the gelid, murky swamps surrounding the most baroque, decadent and delightful city in America; it loves the tawdry sleaze of the French Quarter and the remote mansions of the town's more genteel boroughs.The city's singularity is absolutely appropriate to the movie. In fact it is the movie. It's one of those complex films noirs tracking three generations worth of deceit, an illegally gotten fortune, a suicide that may be murder, a murder that is definitely a murder, porn, corrupt cops, duck hunting and aikido.
FEATURES
By Lawrence Van Gelder and Lawrence Van Gelder,New York Times | April 12, 1991
"This would be a very opportune time for me to get jury duty, I think," James Spader said.One way or another, Spader is headed back to the courtroom this month. And jury duty, he indicated, wouldn't be a bad way of steeping himself in the atmosphere appropriate to his next film. As he has twice before -- in "Wall Street" and in the current "True Colors" -- Spader is taking on the role of a lawyer.This time, the vehicle is "Storyville," a mystery involving murder, politics and family ties to be directed in New Orleans by its writer, Mark Frost, who created "Twin Peaks" with David Lynch.
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