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James Roe

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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1998
The sure hands and long strides of wide receiver James Roe were on display once again at yesterday's practice. But, as he heads into the middle of his third season with the Ravens, Roe remains one step shy of invisible.What was supposed to be his breakout season has turned into a breakdown. What seemed like a typical right hamstring pull that Roe suffered in the middle of training camp led to other ailments in the leg, all of which have slowed a player who was never known for his speed.By this time in 1998, Roe had envisioned himself possibly being the team's No. 3 receiver behind Michael Jackson and Jermaine Lewis.
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By MIKE PRESTON | April 22, 2002
AS SOON AS the Ravens announced their initial fourth-round draft pick yesterday, I immediately ran to the phone and made reservations for a hotel in Westminster for training camp. I pity any fool who gets in my way on Route 140 on opening day. Road rage will be at a maximum. There is now a major reason to be there. It's not Ed Reed, the University of Miami safety and No. 1 pick who looks a little like former Ravens running back Earnest Byner with dreadlocks. Nor is it Notre Dame defensive lineman Anthony Weaver or Minnesota receiver Ron Johnson.
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SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1997
Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda says his decision to start second-year receiver James Roe over Derrick Alexander tomorrow against Seattle does not contain a message regarding the team's long-range intentions for Alexander, who could become an unrestricted free agent in February.Alexander, who leads the Ravens with seven touchdowns and is third in receptions (52) and second in receiving yards (701), was benched for the entire game in last week's 29-27 loss in Jacksonville.Roe played well in his place, catching four passes for 80 yards against the Jaguars.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
James Roe and Floyd Turner barely have been noticed this year, but with the Ravens reeling from injuries to starters Jermaine Lewis and Michael Jackson, the value of those backup receivers has risen markedly.A day after a 38-31 victory over the Indianapolis Colts, a game in which Roe and Turner each caught a touchdown pass -- including the first of Roe's three-year career -- the Ravens were preparing to start the pair against Tennessee on Sunday."Floyd is a veteran who came through. James is not a guy who was playing for the first time," Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda said.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1998
The head games are still being played.Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda did not name Jim Harbaugh his starting quarterback for tomorrow's game, but it has become obvious who will be under center at 1: 01 p.m. when the Ravens play the Jets in Game No. 2 at Giants Stadium.Harbaugh took all his usual repetitions with the first team and showed little discomfort from his previous hyperextended right index finger and right elbow that has tendinitis. Trainder Bill Tessendorf said there was no swelling from Thursday's practice, the hardest work day this week.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht | August 6, 1998
Another day, another fight: Tailback Errict Rhett is challenging offensive tackle Orlando Brown for the title of Player Most Likely To Brawl. During yesterday morning's practice, Rhett and safety Stevon Moore exchanged haymakers and yanked each other's face masks in a doozy that lasted a good minute. At least a dozen players, including Brown, helped break up the scuffle.Up one day, down the next: Two days ago, second-year linebacker Tyrell Peters delivered the shot of the day by knocking fullback Kenyon Cotton off his feet.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
James Roe and Floyd Turner barely have been noticed this year, but with the Ravens reeling from injuries to starters Jermaine Lewis and Michael Jackson, the value of those backup receivers has risen markedly.A day after a 38-31 victory over the Indianapolis Colts, a game in which Roe and Turner each caught a touchdown pass -- including the first of Roe's three-year career -- the Ravens were preparing to start the pair against Tennessee on Sunday."Floyd is a veteran who came through. James is not a guy who was playing for the first time," Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda said.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1996
Sometimes, James Roe has trouble believing he is this close to catching passes in the NFL."Just making it here has been like a dream for me," Roe said after a recent rookie workout at the Ravens' training complex. "I never thought I'd have a chance like this, coming from a small, Division II black college."At Norfolk State, a member of the less-than-vaunted Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association, Roe worked in relative obscurity. Then again, most receivers who put up Roe-like numbers are bound to be noticed, and the Ravens thought enough of his skills to draft Roe in the sixth round.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
PITTSBURGH -- To understand how unsettled the Ravens' receiving corps suddenly has become, all you needed to do was catch a glimpse of the team's practices last week.Wide receiver Michael Jackson, limited by a shoulder injury, was a bystander. Except for Wednesday, when he practiced before his ankle injury flared up, slot receiver Jermaine Lewis also sat out. Meanwhile, the remaining three receivers -- Derrick Alexander, Ryan Yarborough and James Roe -- looked like chess pieces.Alexander, who always works as a wide-out, ran some plays out of the slot.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
PITTSBURGH -- To understand how unsettled the Ravens' receiving corps suddenly has become, all you needed to do was catch a glimpse of the team's practices last week.Wide receiver Michael Jackson, limited by a shoulder injury, was a bystander. Except for Wednesday, when he practiced before his ankle injury flared up, slot receiver Jermaine Lewis also sat out. Meanwhile, the remaining three receivers -- Derrick Alexander, Ryan Yarborough and James Roe -- looked like chess pieces.Alexander, who always works as wide receiver, ran some plays out of the slot.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1998
The sure hands and long strides of wide receiver James Roe were on display once again at yesterday's practice. But, as he heads into the middle of his third season with the Ravens, Roe remains one step shy of invisible.What was supposed to be his breakout season has turned into a breakdown. What seemed like a typical right hamstring pull that Roe suffered in the middle of training camp led to other ailments in the leg, all of which have slowed a player who was never known for his speed.By this time in 1998, Roe had envisioned himself possibly being the team's No. 3 receiver behind Michael Jackson and Jermaine Lewis.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1998
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Cornerback Rod Woodson used the word sloppy to describe the Ravens' play yesterday.Woodson, who intercepted two passes and ran one back for a touchdown, said they played better against the Pittsburgh Steelers last week than they did against the New York Jets.Yet there was one key difference. This time, the Ravens, who have virtually turned finding a way to lose into an art form, found a way to win.That was the most significant thing about the 24-10 victory.This isn't diving or figure skating, where there are points for form.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1998
The head games are still being played.Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda did not name Jim Harbaugh his starting quarterback for tomorrow's game, but it has become obvious who will be under center at 1: 01 p.m. when the Ravens play the Jets in Game No. 2 at Giants Stadium.Harbaugh took all his usual repetitions with the first team and showed little discomfort from his previous hyperextended right index finger and right elbow that has tendinitis. Trainder Bill Tessendorf said there was no swelling from Thursday's practice, the hardest work day this week.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht | August 6, 1998
Another day, another fight: Tailback Errict Rhett is challenging offensive tackle Orlando Brown for the title of Player Most Likely To Brawl. During yesterday morning's practice, Rhett and safety Stevon Moore exchanged haymakers and yanked each other's face masks in a doozy that lasted a good minute. At least a dozen players, including Brown, helped break up the scuffle.Up one day, down the next: Two days ago, second-year linebacker Tyrell Peters delivered the shot of the day by knocking fullback Kenyon Cotton off his feet.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1997
Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda says his decision to start second-year receiver James Roe over Derrick Alexander tomorrow against Seattle does not contain a message regarding the team's long-range intentions for Alexander, who could become an unrestricted free agent in February.Alexander, who leads the Ravens with seven touchdowns and is third in receptions (52) and second in receiving yards (701), was benched for the entire game in last week's 29-27 loss in Jacksonville.Roe played well in his place, catching four passes for 80 yards against the Jaguars.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
PITTSBURGH -- To understand how unsettled the Ravens' receiving corps suddenly has become, all you needed to do was catch a glimpse of the team's practices last week.Wide receiver Michael Jackson, limited by a shoulder injury, was a bystander. Except for Wednesday, when he practiced before his ankle injury flared up, slot receiver Jermaine Lewis also sat out. Meanwhile, the remaining three receivers -- Derrick Alexander, Ryan Yarborough and James Roe -- looked like chess pieces.Alexander, who always works as a wide-out, ran some plays out of the slot.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
James Roe knows the deal. As the Ravens' fifth receiver, he understands why his playing time is so limited. But as a second-year player, he is understandably frustrated by his lack of game-day activity, although he is too smart and feels too fortunate to complain about it.So Roe simply improves, quietly and steadily, on the smaller, unlighted stage known as the practice field. On a typical day, he is out there looking smooth, showing off a fluid move here, a head fake there, catching everything that's thrown to him.At 6 feet 1, 187 pounds, Roe cuts a graceful figure, and history suggests he will be making noise on Sundays before long.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1996
The Ravens have reached agreement in principle on a contract with No. 1 draft pick Jonathan Ogden, a source close to the team confirmed last night.Details of the contract were not available, but the deal is believed to be for six or seven years. Ogden, the left offensive tackle from UCLA, was the fourth player chosen in the NFL draft.According to the source, only minor details of the contract need to be completed before it is signed by Ogden, who will report Monday with the other rookies for camp at Western Maryland College.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
PITTSBURGH -- To understand how unsettled the Ravens' receiving corps suddenly has become, all you needed to do was catch a glimpse of the team's practices last week.Wide receiver Michael Jackson, limited by a shoulder injury, was a bystander. Except for Wednesday, when he practiced before his ankle injury flared up, slot receiver Jermaine Lewis also sat out. Meanwhile, the remaining three receivers -- Derrick Alexander, Ryan Yarborough and James Roe -- looked like chess pieces.Alexander, who always works as wide receiver, ran some plays out of the slot.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
James Roe knows the deal. As the Ravens' fifth receiver, he understands why his playing time is so limited. But as a second-year player, he is understandably frustrated by his lack of game-day activity, although he is too smart and feels too fortunate to complain about it.So Roe simply improves, quietly and steadily, on the smaller, unlighted stage known as the practice field. On a typical day, he is out there looking smooth, showing off a fluid move here, a head fake there, catching everything that's thrown to him.At 6 feet 1, 187 pounds, Roe cuts a graceful figure, and history suggests he will be making noise on Sundays before long.
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