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James Longstreet

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By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
On hundreds of courthouse lawns and public parks North and South, statues of sword-waving generals and monuments to hometown heroes of the Civil War abound. But there has always been one conspicuous exception: Lt. Gen. James Longstreet.A talented corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia, he was praised by Gen. Robert E. Lee as "my old war horse" and was one of the most important figures in the Battle of Gettysburg.But for more than a hundred years, die-hard supporters of the Confederacy have reviled Longstreet because he was later critical of the tactics of the revered Lee, joined the Republican Party of Abraham Lincoln and fought for black voting rights.
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NEWS
July 1, 2001
Carroll Lutheran names social services coordinator Chris Contarino has been named social services coordinator for Carroll Lutheran Village's Diven House. A graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park with a degree in psychology and community development, Contarino will oversee the social, emotional and physical welfare of assisted-living residents and work with residents and their families to make sure residents' needs are met. Contarino lives in Westminster. She and her husband, Bob, have one daughter.
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NEWS
July 1, 2001
Carroll Lutheran names social services coordinator Chris Contarino has been named social services coordinator for Carroll Lutheran Village's Diven House. A graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park with a degree in psychology and community development, Contarino will oversee the social, emotional and physical welfare of assisted-living residents and work with residents and their families to make sure residents' needs are met. Contarino lives in Westminster. She and her husband, Bob, have one daughter.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
On hundreds of courthouse lawns and public parks North and South, statues of sword-waving generals and monuments to hometown heroes of the Civil War abound. But there has always been one conspicuous exception: Lt. Gen. James Longstreet.A talented corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia, he was praised by Gen. Robert E. Lee as "my old war horse" and was one of the most important figures in the Battle of Gettysburg.But for more than a hundred years, die-hard supporters of the Confederacy have reviled Longstreet because he was later critical of the tactics of the revered Lee, joined the Republican Party of Abraham Lincoln and fought for black voting rights.
NEWS
June 27, 2004
LOCATION From U.S. 15 take the Steinwehr Avenue exit. Go north on Steinwehr Avenue 200 yards. Turn left onto Bull Frog Road (about 1.5 miles). Turn right onto Pumping Station Road (about 1.5 miles) to the re-enactment site. FRIDAY, JULY 2 8:30 a.m.: Gates open 9 a.m.: Cavalry exhibition (Tent 1); medical demonstration (Tent 2) 10 a.m.: Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet (Tent 1); Civil War spies (Tent 2) 11 a.m.: U.S. generals (Tent 1); Confederate generals (Tent 2) Noon: Confederate Lt. Gen. A.P. Hill (Tent 1)
FEATURES
By Drew Jubera and Drew Jubera,Cox News Service | October 9, 1993
Turner Pictures' $20-million "Gettysburg," which opened at theaters nationwide yesterday, is as close to moguldom as Ted Turner can get. For now, at least.It's his "Birth of a Nation" meets "Ran": a four-hour plus adaptation of "The Killer Angels," the 1975 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Michael Shaara about the men behind one of the bloodiest battles in U.S. history. It has an all-star, all-guy cast that includes Martin Sheen (Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee), Tom Berenger (Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet)
NEWS
By Gregory Romano and Gregory Romano,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Although the battle of Little Round Top is one of the most famous events at the battle of Gettysburg, it was in many ways an accident. The commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. Robert E. Lee, ordered Lt. Gen. James Longstreet, commander of the army's 1st Corps, to attack the exposed southern flank of the 3rd Corps of the Union Army, which had advanced beyond the Union line on Cemetery Ridge to a position in the Peach Orchard along the Emmitsburg...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
Thanks to an Anne Arundel County couple, tourists and the ghost of Confederate Gen. James Longstreet can continue to hang out together on the Antietam battlefield.The Piper House, probably the only bed-and-breakfast inn operating smack in the middle of a Civil War battlefield -- and certainly the only one that once served as the headquarters of a Confederate general -- had been in danger of closing. Its operator, Douglas Reed, and the National Park Service, which administers the house and battlefield, had been unable to agree on changes to the 56-year lease he had signed in 1985.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
Film scouts are scanning the county horizon, searching for the most authentic sites to shoot Civil War scenes.Communications director Micki Smith toured Uniontown, New Windsor and Harney recently with the production manager of "Killer Angels," a four-hour miniseries that will air on Turner Network Television.Most of the shooting will take place at the battleground in Gettysburg, Pa., but some will be done elsewhere. "We were looking for a small town to replicate the time of the battle 130 years ago," said Smith.
FEATURES
By Patrick T. Reardon and Patrick T. Reardon,Chicago Tribune | December 6, 1994
On the morning of May 5, 1864 -- the first day of the Civil War's Battle of the Wilderness -- Confederate generals Robert E. Lee, J. E. B. Stuart and A. P. Hill sat under a tree on the Widow Tapp's farm, talking about fighting already under way.Suddenly, looking north across a field, the generals saw Union soldiers gingerly stepping out of thick woods 200 yards away."
NEWS
December 17, 2003
ANNIE OAKLEY, 43, had just quit Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Clark Gable was 2 years old. Mark Twain was 68; Ernest Hemingway was 4. In Russia, the Bolsheviks split with the Mensheviks. Pablo Picasso, 22, was in his "blue period." The artists James Whistler and Paul Gauguin died; Mark Rothko was born. So was Lou Gehrig. And Bob Hope. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles, who had lost his leg 40 years earlier at Gettysburg, was 84. Henry Cabot Lodge, who was to be Lyndon Johnson's ambassador to South Vietnam, was a baby.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | May 26, 1991
When the graves have been decorated and the volleys fired in the cemeteries and the speeches made and the veterans have marched by this Thursday, it will be the 123rd year that official Memorial Day tributes have been made to fallen U.S. soldiery.Though Confederate grave decorating and memorial services began soon after the Civil War, the national Memorial Day celebration has Northern roots.As the story goes, three years after Appomattox settled the Civil War, a Union Army veteran, Gen. N. P. Chipman, then adjutant general of the Ohio Union veteran's group (the Grand Army of the Republic)
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