Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJames Levine
IN THE NEWS

James Levine

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 27, 2004
NEW YORK - What with the Red Sox perhaps on the verge of lifting a dreaded curse, a resident senator running neck-and-neck against an incumbent president and, now, a new leader generating sparks from the podium of the city's famed orchestra, Boston has a lot to crow about these days. Whatever happens at the World Series or the voting booth, the musical advantage should last for a long while. Last weekend, James Levine took his first bow as the 14th music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the first American-born holder of the title in the ensemble's 124 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 27, 2004
NEW YORK - What with the Red Sox perhaps on the verge of lifting a dreaded curse, a resident senator running neck-and-neck against an incumbent president and, now, a new leader generating sparks from the podium of the city's famed orchestra, Boston has a lot to crow about these days. Whatever happens at the World Series or the voting booth, the musical advantage should last for a long while. Last weekend, James Levine took his first bow as the 14th music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the first American-born holder of the title in the ensemble's 124 years.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 14, 1998
These are excerpts from "Working Fathers: New Strategies for Balancing Work and Family," by James Levine, (Harcourt Brace & Co.):Households headed by single fathers are the fastest growing type in the United States. While the numbers are small -- an estimated 1.4 million in 1995 -- single-dad households are expected to grow by 14 percent by 2000.More mothers and fathers are working at home. In 1996, 47.4 million people were working at home, up 29 percent from 1989.In the United States, 1 percent of fathers in the public or private sector are eligible for paid paternity leave, compared with 3 percent of mothers in the private sector and 1 percent of mothers in the public sector.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and By J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 6, 2000
Fantasia 2000 An Original Walt Disney Records Soundtrack (Walt Disney 60986) Walt Disney's "Fantasia" was always the most high-minded of animated films. The original 1940 feature wasn't just a visual and aural tour de force; it was also a sly lesson in music appreciation, bringing the classics to audiences who otherwise might never have heard Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours." Naturally, there's an element of edification in "Fantasia 2000" as well. From the opening semaphore of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, conductor James Levine -- assuming the role Leopold Stokowski held in the original -- does his best to make classical music seem as entertaining and exciting as a John Williams "Star Wars" score.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 30, 1994
Stravinsky's "Le Sacre du Printemps" and Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" (edited by Ravel). Performed by James Levine and the MET Orchestra. (Deutsche Grammophon 437 531-2)In his 22-year tenure as its conductor, James Levine has turned the orchestra of the Metropolitan Opera into one of the greatest in the world. About 12 years ago, Levine and the MET Orchestra took their first step into the purely orchestral repertory with a performance of Stravinsky's "Le Sacre." In the last few years, such ventures into the concert hall have become more frequent, and Deutsche Grammophon (DG)
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 14, 1991
Boston -- One blazing hot afternoon, I was the sole captive audience for a Washington cab driver as he extolled the vices of his city and the virtues of his second wife. ''One thing about my wife,'' he intoned, ''she's a good provider.''This was said with such matter-of-fact appreciation that I couldn't help smiling. I had never heard such a traditionally male expression applied to a female without at least a nod, a wink, a hint of some ''Mr. Mom'' role reversal about it.But the more I ran that sentence around in my mind, and the more I repeated the driver's line, the more it occurred to me that I rarely hear that kind of kudo to men anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and By J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 6, 2000
Fantasia 2000 An Original Walt Disney Records Soundtrack (Walt Disney 60986) Walt Disney's "Fantasia" was always the most high-minded of animated films. The original 1940 feature wasn't just a visual and aural tour de force; it was also a sly lesson in music appreciation, bringing the classics to audiences who otherwise might never have heard Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours." Naturally, there's an element of edification in "Fantasia 2000" as well. From the opening semaphore of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, conductor James Levine -- assuming the role Leopold Stokowski held in the original -- does his best to make classical music seem as entertaining and exciting as a John Williams "Star Wars" score.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff | October 30, 1990
The master rake, Don Giovanni, gets his just rewards again in the end but not before Mozart's ravishing music flows from the Metropolitan Opera tomorrow when the new Franco Zeffirelli production is shown from 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.Videotaped last April, "Don Giovanni" features Samuel Ramey, bass, in the title role with James Levine conducting the 1787 opera. Also singing, in order of appearance, are bass Ferruccio Furlanetto as Leporello; soprano Carol Vaness as Donna Anna; bass Kurt Moll as Commendatore; tenor Jerry Hadley as Don Ottavio; soprano Karita Mattila as Donna Elvira; soprano Dawn Upshaw as Zerlina and bass Philip Cokorinos as Masetto.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff RlB | May 22, 1991
This is the Year of Mozart, the 200th anniversary of his death. More by accident, it's also the year of "The Masked Ball," Verdi's aria-packed opera staged by about every company in sight, including the Met and the Baltimore Opera.Tonight at 8 p.m. on MPT's channels 22 and 67, the Met's 2 1/2 -hour version taped Jan. 26 brings a solid performance of the 1859 opera romanticizing events leading to the assassination of the popular Swedish King Gustav III at a 1792 court ball.James Levine conducts and F. Murray Abraham is the host.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2001
If the string quartet is master of the instrumental chamber music idiom, the woodwind quintet sleeps with the servants. Oh, how the great composers lavished extraordinary care on their string quartets. Franz Joseph Haydn, the inventor of the genre, wrote more than 80 of them. Beethoven gave us 16 that span each period of his artistic life. But works for an ensemble of flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and French horn in those two canons with no orchestra or piano to accompany them? Good luck trying to find one. Still, there is a marvelous woodwind quartet repertoire.
NEWS
October 14, 1998
These are excerpts from "Working Fathers: New Strategies for Balancing Work and Family," by James Levine, (Harcourt Brace & Co.):Households headed by single fathers are the fastest growing type in the United States. While the numbers are small -- an estimated 1.4 million in 1995 -- single-dad households are expected to grow by 14 percent by 2000.More mothers and fathers are working at home. In 1996, 47.4 million people were working at home, up 29 percent from 1989.In the United States, 1 percent of fathers in the public or private sector are eligible for paid paternity leave, compared with 3 percent of mothers in the private sector and 1 percent of mothers in the public sector.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 30, 1994
Stravinsky's "Le Sacre du Printemps" and Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" (edited by Ravel). Performed by James Levine and the MET Orchestra. (Deutsche Grammophon 437 531-2)In his 22-year tenure as its conductor, James Levine has turned the orchestra of the Metropolitan Opera into one of the greatest in the world. About 12 years ago, Levine and the MET Orchestra took their first step into the purely orchestral repertory with a performance of Stravinsky's "Le Sacre." In the last few years, such ventures into the concert hall have become more frequent, and Deutsche Grammophon (DG)
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 14, 1991
Boston -- One blazing hot afternoon, I was the sole captive audience for a Washington cab driver as he extolled the vices of his city and the virtues of his second wife. ''One thing about my wife,'' he intoned, ''she's a good provider.''This was said with such matter-of-fact appreciation that I couldn't help smiling. I had never heard such a traditionally male expression applied to a female without at least a nod, a wink, a hint of some ''Mr. Mom'' role reversal about it.But the more I ran that sentence around in my mind, and the more I repeated the driver's line, the more it occurred to me that I rarely hear that kind of kudo to men anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 11, 1999
With the exception of James Levine, the music director of the Metropolitan Opera, each of the most sought-after contenders for the music directorships in Boston, New York and Philadelphia is a European.This is always the case in such high-level searches, and for years many voices in the classical music world -- mostly those of American critics and conductors -- have decried this state of affairs. They have maintained that American orchestra boards continue to shortchange home-grown talent for what they perceive as "foreign glamour."
NEWS
By BILLBOARD | August 18, 1996
For years, Keith Richards has indulged a habit not uncommon among rock and rollers: listening to classical music.In fact, it was the Rolling Stones' publicly proclaimed taste for Mozart and Bach that helped inspire "Exile on Classical Street," an innovative attempt by London Records to get the younger set hip to the sounds of yesterday while raising money for the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS) Foundation."Exile on Classical Street" is a compilation of the favorite classical pieces of a dozen of the world's biggest pop stars.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.