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James Lee Burke

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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 9, 1992
Washington -- James Lee Burke is speaking about gratitude (( and appreciation of good fortune now that, at age 55, his books are finally being read and appreciated. His voice drops to a near-whisper as he talks with slight disbelief about Joyce Carol Oates' rave review of his most recent crime novel, or when he marvels at the splendid mountain setting of his home near Missoula, Mont.And there's something else to be thankful for: He still knows pain, but he is grateful every day not to be drinking himself to death.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
Want to know how to tell an author is really successful? The jacket photo gets bigger, while the writer's biography gets smaller.For one thing, there is no day job to detail. And as the volumes grow, it becomes unwieldy to list them all by name. Better just to tote them up and give the number, maybe mention how many are best sellers.Author James Lee Burke's bios have gotten pretty darn terse over 32 years of publishing.His first novel told of his odd jobs, his teaching job, the fact that he was an honors graduate from the University of Missouri.
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FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 9, 1992
Washington -- James Lee Burke is speaking about gratitud (( and appreciation of good fortune now that, at age 55, his books are finally being read and appreciated. His voice drops to a near-whisper as he talks with slight disbelief about Joyce Carol Oates' rave review of his most recent crime novel, or when he marvels at the splendid mountain setting of his home near Missoula, Mont.And there's something else to be thankful for: He still knows pain, but he is grateful every day not to be drinking himself to death.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 12, 1996
It began Friday with a tornado and it closes Aug. 30 with morons. What could be more emblematic of the 1996 summer film season: hot air and stupidity. Or of any summer film season.Yet look closely and -- amid the remade '50s TV series and the big, stupid Arnold movies and the Earth vs. the Flying Saucers thing -- odd emissaries from the empire of literature pop out at odd moments. Jane Austen returns, so does Daniel Defoe (twice) and that's Daniel Defoe, not Willem Dafoe, boys and girls. Hugo is around, too, as in Victor, not as in "cheap Yugoslavian car."
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | August 14, 1994
"Dixie City Jam" is the seventh crime novel by James Lee Burke, and it appears that, by its early position on the best-seller lists, that he is finally getting the recognition he deserves. Mr. Burke's Dave Robicheaux novels have been among the best in American crime fiction of the past decade, and while fans have been touting this series from the opening book, "Neon Rain," commercial success has come more slowly. "Dixie City Jam," one of the strongest books in the series, may just put him over the top.Robicheaux is a former New Orleans homicide detective, a recovering alcoholic, who now operates as a sheriff's deputy in New Iberia, La., and also runs a fishing camp there.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
"Fecund," variously defined as fertile, teeming and fruitful, seems to appear at least once somewhere in the Dave Robicheaux novels of James Lee Burke. Finding it confirms you're in the land of south Louisiana. Even if you've never been there before, Mr. Burke's Cajun country feels like home."Fecund" appears on the first page of Mr. Burke's latest, "In the Electric Mist With Confederate Dead." Detective Robicheaux, off-duty from a day of searching for and finding a 19-year-old murder victim, describes the town of New Iberia after a sunset storm off the Gulf of Mexico.
NEWS
By TIM WARREN THE MIDNIGHT HORSE. Sid Fleischman; illustrations by Peter Sis. Greenwillow Books. 84 pages. $12.95. Ages 8 and up | February 3, 1991
A MORNING FOR FLAMINGOS.James Lee Burke. Little, Brown. 294 pages. $18.95. Things got too personal and too rough for Dave Robicheaux when he was a homicide detective in New Orleans. He got mixed up with the wrong crowd and lost a career, a wife and most of his soul. Now he's back in New Iberia, La., working in the police department and trying to nurse the many wounds he's accumulated from a broken childhood, a tour in Vietnam and 30 years of finding solace in the bottle. But he gets no peace.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
Want to know how to tell an author is really successful? The jacket photo gets bigger, while the writer's biography gets smaller.For one thing, there is no day job to detail. And as the volumes grow, it becomes unwieldy to list them all by name. Better just to tote them up and give the number, maybe mention how many are best sellers.Author James Lee Burke's bios have gotten pretty darn terse over 32 years of publishing.His first novel told of his odd jobs, his teaching job, the fact that he was an honors graduate from the University of Missouri.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 12, 1996
It began Friday with a tornado and it closes Aug. 30 with morons. What could be more emblematic of the 1996 summer film season: hot air and stupidity. Or of any summer film season.Yet look closely and -- amid the remade '50s TV series and the big, stupid Arnold movies and the Earth vs. the Flying Saucers thing -- odd emissaries from the empire of literature pop out at odd moments. Jane Austen returns, so does Daniel Defoe (twice) and that's Daniel Defoe, not Willem Dafoe, boys and girls. Hugo is around, too, as in Victor, not as in "cheap Yugoslavian car."
NEWS
August 20, 1995
We set up the store totally by the New York Times bestseller list because we only have room for about 40 or so titles. "Body Farm" is selling faster than anything. Even before it up climbed the list it was selling. The Stephen King book is pretty dead and the "Alienist" is still good. In hardcover, "1945" is going, but only a few of those.Michael Joachim,Hudson News at BWI airportAt National, the top three are "Body Farm," "Debt of Honor" and "Big Sea City Jam," by James Lee Burke. At Dulles, "Nothing Lasts for Ever," Sydney Sheldon, "Debt of Honor" again and "Last Innocent Man," by Philipp Margolin.
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | August 14, 1994
"Dixie City Jam" is the seventh crime novel by James Lee Burke, and it appears that, by its early position on the best-seller lists, that he is finally getting the recognition he deserves. Mr. Burke's Dave Robicheaux novels have been among the best in American crime fiction of the past decade, and while fans have been touting this series from the opening book, "Neon Rain," commercial success has come more slowly. "Dixie City Jam," one of the strongest books in the series, may just put him over the top.Robicheaux is a former New Orleans homicide detective, a recovering alcoholic, who now operates as a sheriff's deputy in New Iberia, La., and also runs a fishing camp there.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
"Fecund," variously defined as fertile, teeming and fruitful, seems to appear at least once somewhere in the Dave Robicheaux novels of James Lee Burke. Finding it confirms you're in the land of south Louisiana. Even if you've never been there before, Mr. Burke's Cajun country feels like home."Fecund" appears on the first page of Mr. Burke's latest, "In the Electric Mist With Confederate Dead." Detective Robicheaux, off-duty from a day of searching for and finding a 19-year-old murder victim, describes the town of New Iberia after a sunset storm off the Gulf of Mexico.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 9, 1992
Washington -- James Lee Burke is speaking about gratitud (( and appreciation of good fortune now that, at age 55, his books are finally being read and appreciated. His voice drops to a near-whisper as he talks with slight disbelief about Joyce Carol Oates' rave review of his most recent crime novel, or when he marvels at the splendid mountain setting of his home near Missoula, Mont.And there's something else to be thankful for: He still knows pain, but he is grateful every day not to be drinking himself to death.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 9, 1992
Washington -- James Lee Burke is speaking about gratitude (( and appreciation of good fortune now that, at age 55, his books are finally being read and appreciated. His voice drops to a near-whisper as he talks with slight disbelief about Joyce Carol Oates' rave review of his most recent crime novel, or when he marvels at the splendid mountain setting of his home near Missoula, Mont.And there's something else to be thankful for: He still knows pain, but he is grateful every day not to be drinking himself to death.
NEWS
By TIM WARREN THE MIDNIGHT HORSE. Sid Fleischman; illustrations by Peter Sis. Greenwillow Books. 84 pages. $12.95. Ages 8 and up | February 3, 1991
A MORNING FOR FLAMINGOS.James Lee Burke. Little, Brown. 294 pages. $18.95. Things got too personal and too rough for Dave Robicheaux when he was a homicide detective in New Orleans. He got mixed up with the wrong crowd and lost a career, a wife and most of his soul. Now he's back in New Iberia, La., working in the police department and trying to nurse the many wounds he's accumulated from a broken childhood, a tour in Vietnam and 30 years of finding solace in the bottle. But he gets no peace.
FEATURES
May 2, 1998
Laura Lippman, a Sun features writer, has won a 1998 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for her Baltimore-based 1997 mystery, "Charm City."Lippman's was among more than a dozen awards handed out Thursday evening by the mystery writers group, a 53-year-old organization dedicated to promoting the mystery as a literary genre. The Edgar is named for mystery pioneer Edgar Allan Poe. Her book "Charm City" (Avon), featuring a Baltimore newspaper reporter-turned-sleuth, was named best paperback original of 1997.
NEWS
July 12, 2009
"Best Friends Forever" Jennifer Weiner (Atria, $26.99) Addie Downs and Valerie Adler were supposed to be best friends forever until the drama and popularity contests of high school got in the way. Fifteen years later, Val is a local celebrity and Addie is a frumpy homebody, but a strange crime in their small hometown in Illinois compels them to reunite and figure out where they went wrong, reconciling the friendship along the way. "Rain Gods" ...
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