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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
James Gandolfini, whose remarkable performance as mob boss Tony Soprano in HBO's "The Sopranos" re-imagined the anti-hero for American television, is dead at 51 years of age. The actor, who is believed to have died of a heart attack, was traveling in Italy at the time of his death Wednesday. HBO confirmed his death. "We're all in shock and feeling immeasurable sadness at the loss of a beloved member of our family," an HBO statement said. "He was special man, a great talent, but more importantly a gentle and loving person who treated everyone no matter their title or position with equal respect.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
James Gandolfini, whose remarkable performance as mob boss Tony Soprano in HBO's "The Sopranos" re-imagined the anti-hero for American television, is dead at 51 years of age. The actor, who is believed to have died of a heart attack, was traveling in Italy at the time of his death Wednesday. HBO confirmed his death. "We're all in shock and feeling immeasurable sadness at the loss of a beloved member of our family," an HBO statement said. "He was special man, a great talent, but more importantly a gentle and loving person who treated everyone no matter their title or position with equal respect.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 26, 1999
Does anyone remember when Nicolas Cage used to be an actor?Was "Raising Arizona" really that long ago? Or, for that matter, "Moonstruck," "Red Rock West," "Leaving Las Vegas?"Oscar in hand, Cage took the low road with the awful action picture "The Rock," a diversion his admirers could explain away as a campy wink to his populist roots. Then came an overwrought turn in "Face/Off" by trendy Hong Kong bullet choreographer John Woo, which was cool because it was Woo. Then "Con Air," another one from the producers of "The Rock," only twice as idiotic and three times as despicable.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | October 9, 2009
'The Baader-Meinhof Complex' ***1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) One of the few political movies of the new millennium that comes close to the excitement and revelation of classics like "Z" or "The Battle of Algiers," this unsparing look at the West German terrorists who brewed bloody revolutionary actions out of muddled Marxist theory is an exciting, combative and infuriating experience. It boasts another indelible performance from Martina Gedeck, who makes something both moving and harrowing out of Ulrike Meinhof's transformation from bourgeois left-wing intellectual to terrorist.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | October 9, 2009
'The Baader-Meinhof Complex' ***1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) One of the few political movies of the new millennium that comes close to the excitement and revelation of classics like "Z" or "The Battle of Algiers," this unsparing look at the West German terrorists who brewed bloody revolutionary actions out of muddled Marxist theory is an exciting, combative and infuriating experience. It boasts another indelible performance from Martina Gedeck, who makes something both moving and harrowing out of Ulrike Meinhof's transformation from bourgeois left-wing intellectual to terrorist.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 16, 2000
LOS ANGELES - Aaron Sorkin's "West Wing" was the biggest winner, but one of the most prestigious awards last night at the 16th Annual Television Critics Association Awards ceremony here went to HBO's "The Corner." "The Corner," which was filmed in Baltimore and told the story of a family struggling to escape drug addiction, won the award as Best Movie or Mini-Series. It was based on a nonfiction book of the same title by David Simon and Edward Burns. Simon co-wrote and co-produced the miniseries with David Mills.
FEATURES
December 21, 2007
Taking a page from Pennies From Heaven, the family and neighbors of Romance & Cigarettes' Nick Murder (James Gandolfini) act out by singing along to kitschy hits, such as Engelbert Humperdinck's "A Man Without Love." It's karaoke with a vengeance as Murder, a Queens, N.Y., construction worker, takes refuge from a dead marriage in the arms of an underwear shop clerk (Kate Winslet, ferreting humanity out of a crass other-woman stereotype). His wife (Susan Sarandon) and his daughters (Mary-Louise Parker, Mandy Moore, Aida Turturro)
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2002
Rutgers football, which has won just one Big East Conference game in the past three seasons, can use all the help it can get. Good thing the program has connections - James Gandolfini, a 1983 graduate who just happens to be the star of the HBO television series, The Sopranos. Gandolfini, who plays mob boss Tony Soprano, recently shot a commercial gently twisting the arms of New Jersey residents to support the state's only Division I-A team. In the spot, Gandolfini assures his pals they will have great seats at Rutgers Stadium.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 10, 2009
U2's Bono to write column for The New York Times Bono - lead singer for U2 and an advocate in the fight against poverty in Africa and AIDS - will write an Op-Ed column for The New York Times. The paper announced that his first column will appear tomorrow, for which he will also do a podcast. His column will appear occasionally. Bono, 48, called the gig "an honor," and joked that he's "never been great with the full stops or commas." The Times said the column will cover a broad range of topics.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 8, 2004
BASED ON LAST night's HBO season premiere of The Sopranos, here's a tip for any waiters who happen to draw the Tony Soprano party: It's probably not a good idea to complain about the tip. My God, did you see what they did to that poor guy who grumbled about being stiffed on an $1,100 tab? First, Christopher fires a brick at the back of his head. Then, Paulie Walnuts shoots him! And that's after they enjoyed the meal! What do these people do to the waiter when the food stinks: Feed him to the sharks?
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 10, 2009
U2's Bono to write column for The New York Times Bono - lead singer for U2 and an advocate in the fight against poverty in Africa and AIDS - will write an Op-Ed column for The New York Times. The paper announced that his first column will appear tomorrow, for which he will also do a podcast. His column will appear occasionally. Bono, 48, called the gig "an honor," and joked that he's "never been great with the full stops or commas." The Times said the column will cover a broad range of topics.
FEATURES
December 21, 2007
Taking a page from Pennies From Heaven, the family and neighbors of Romance & Cigarettes' Nick Murder (James Gandolfini) act out by singing along to kitschy hits, such as Engelbert Humperdinck's "A Man Without Love." It's karaoke with a vengeance as Murder, a Queens, N.Y., construction worker, takes refuge from a dead marriage in the arms of an underwear shop clerk (Kate Winslet, ferreting humanity out of a crass other-woman stereotype). His wife (Susan Sarandon) and his daughters (Mary-Louise Parker, Mandy Moore, Aida Turturro)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | June 6, 2004
The Sopranos is back in touch with its inner, primitive self. That means blood, rage and war -- and great television drama as Season 5 comes to an end. In the previous episode -- the best hour of prime-time television this year -- Adriana La Cerva (Drea de Matteo) is murdered. The show, which aired two weeks ago, works wonderfully because in it, the acclaimed HBO drama about a family of New Jersey mobsters returns to the roots of its appeal: tribalism accompanied by whatever violence is necessary to preserve the "family."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 2, 2004
In: The Donald. Out: Joey, Monica, Phoebe, Ross, Rachel and Chandler. In: Being mean. Out: Making nice. In: Relationships of convenience. Out: Friends. There is an unmistakable symmetry in NBC's decision to replace Friends next fall with The Apprentice as the new star of its Thursday night lineup of "must-see" TV. The Friends finale, which airs this Thursday, marks more than the departure of one of the longest-running and most successful sitcoms in television history. Passing with it from center stage in American popular culture is one of the most enduring and uplifting themes that prime-time TV has ever offered: the celebration of community.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 8, 2004
BASED ON LAST night's HBO season premiere of The Sopranos, here's a tip for any waiters who happen to draw the Tony Soprano party: It's probably not a good idea to complain about the tip. My God, did you see what they did to that poor guy who grumbled about being stiffed on an $1,100 tab? First, Christopher fires a brick at the back of his head. Then, Paulie Walnuts shoots him! And that's after they enjoyed the meal! What do these people do to the waiter when the food stinks: Feed him to the sharks?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 7, 2004
When The Sopranos returns tonight for the start of its long-awaited fifth season on HBO, it takes exactly 81 seconds to be reminded that this is not just another television series. The Sopranos is weekly TV drama as the Great American Novel. The camera opens on the back yard of Tony and Carmela Soprano's sprawling suburban New Jersey home. The pool and the barbecue need cleaning. Leaves lay scattered about, and the water in the pool is deathly still. There's an air of emptiness and loneliness to the tableau as the camera stops for a moment to look at (but not into)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | June 6, 2004
The Sopranos is back in touch with its inner, primitive self. That means blood, rage and war -- and great television drama as Season 5 comes to an end. In the previous episode -- the best hour of prime-time television this year -- Adriana La Cerva (Drea de Matteo) is murdered. The show, which aired two weeks ago, works wonderfully because in it, the acclaimed HBO drama about a family of New Jersey mobsters returns to the roots of its appeal: tribalism accompanied by whatever violence is necessary to preserve the "family."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 28, 2001
It has been a very good year for television viewers. There, I said it. I can't believe it either. After years of looking back and grousing about the medium in these annual year-end pieces, I have to acknowledge that television has given us one of the best years of our viewing lives on a variety of programming fronts in 2001. And that's saying something for a year that included the premiere of Temptation Island and Chains of Love. Here are 10 primary programming categories or genres, and the shows within them that brightened the television year - as well as my critical outlook.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2002
Rutgers football, which has won just one Big East Conference game in the past three seasons, can use all the help it can get. Good thing the program has connections - James Gandolfini, a 1983 graduate who just happens to be the star of the HBO television series, The Sopranos. Gandolfini, who plays mob boss Tony Soprano, recently shot a commercial gently twisting the arms of New Jersey residents to support the state's only Division I-A team. In the spot, Gandolfini assures his pals they will have great seats at Rutgers Stadium.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 28, 2001
It has been a very good year for television viewers. There, I said it. I can't believe it either. After years of looking back and grousing about the medium in these annual year-end pieces, I have to acknowledge that television has given us one of the best years of our viewing lives on a variety of programming fronts in 2001. And that's saying something for a year that included the premiere of Temptation Island and Chains of Love. Here are 10 primary programming categories or genres, and the shows within them that brightened the television year - as well as my critical outlook.
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