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NEWS
April 24, 1998
HE SLEW the dreamer. Or so it was said of James Earl Ray, convicted of murder in the 1968 slaying of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. But Ray, who died a prisoner Thursday after years of suffering from hepatitis, claimed he wasn't the one.He confessed to the crime to avoid capital punishment, but within days recanted. Nonetheless, no trial occurred.The death of Ray probably means the questions he continued to raise about Dr. King's death will never be answered. That is a blow that will be felt most by the King family, which, in recent months, announced that it believed Ray and joined his unsuccessful effort to receive a trial.
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FEATURES
April 23, 2008
April 23 1998 James Earl Ray, who'd confessed to assassinating the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 and then insisted he'd been framed, died at a Nashville, Tenn., hospital at age 70.
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FEATURES
April 23, 2008
April 23 1998 James Earl Ray, who'd confessed to assassinating the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 and then insisted he'd been framed, died at a Nashville, Tenn., hospital at age 70.
FEATURES
By ELSBETH L. BOTHE and ELSBETH L. BOTHE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1998
What are murderers made of? Nothing very nice. Who wants to read about fictitiously good people when we can vicariously engage the lives and deeds of that aberrant few who are capable of committing ultimate sin?There exists an unsatiable urge to push and probe into the psyches of killers, their means, methods and motives, their backgrounds, relationships and trials both in and out of court, from birth to death - most dramatically by execution in retaliation for ending the lives of uncelebrated victims.
NEWS
By CARL ROWAN | April 7, 1993
Washington. -- So the jury in HBO's gripping mock trial has declared that James Earl Ray did not murder Martin Luther King Jr.I am not surprised, because I don't believe any open-minded person can look at the evidence presented and conclude that Ray alone committed one of the most shocking murders of the century.This absorbing HBO ''trial'' is a great public service, because it makes available to ordinary Americans facts, evidence, testimony that make it clear that while Ray is a scoundrel, he is also the pawn, the fall guy, in a murder perpetrated by powerful law-enforcement figures who could manipulate the courts, lawyers and politicians.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 18, 1993
Los Angeles -- Blame it on Oliver Stone and "JFK" or, maybe, the seemingly insatiable appetite of prime-time TV for low-cost "reality" programs that generate great profits these days.Fox Broadcasting -- the network of Al Bundy and Bart Simpson -- is getting into the investigative journalism business this week with "Who Killed Martin Luther King?" The report, with actor Larry Fishburne as host, is to air at 9 p.m. Friday on WBFF (Channel 45).The report suggests that James Earl Ray, the man convicted of killing King in Memphis in 1968, was not the gunman and that King's assassination was the result of a conspiracy involving the FBI. In a sense, it's "JFK" with Ray replacing Lee Harvey Oswald in the scenario.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 5, 1997
This is a hard one to write, inasmuch as I have to scold what may be black America's first family: the survivors of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.But it has to be said, so here goes. Dexter King, son of Martin Luther King Jr., is a sap. There's simply no other word for it. And just because Dexter is Dr. King's son doesn't make him any less of a sap. The truth is, Dexter's dad had some sappy moments of his own.Take, for example, the elder King's well-known statement during the civil rights struggle in which he suggested to white racists that they could beat, bludgeon, shoot, hang and bomb black folks, who would be forgiving of all these atrocities.
FEATURES
By ELSBETH L. BOTHE and ELSBETH L. BOTHE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1998
What are murderers made of? Nothing very nice. Who wants to read about fictitiously good people when we can vicariously engage the lives and deeds of that aberrant few who are capable of committing ultimate sin?There exists an unsatiable urge to push and probe into the psyches of killers, their means, methods and motives, their backgrounds, relationships and trials both in and out of court, from birth to death - most dramatically by execution in retaliation for ending the lives of uncelebrated victims.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 2, 1993
James Earl Ray, the confessed killer of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., says it's a great TV show.The question is why was he asked in the first place.Ray was asked because HBO's "Guilt or Innocence: The Trial of James Earl Ray," which airs Sunday night at 8, goes beyond mere blurring of the lines between fact and fiction, reality and entertainment. The mock trial of Ray obliterates the lines. Once you get this far into shaking and baking history into a show-biz cutlet, why not ask Ray himself for a critique of the telecast and see how strange things can get?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 1997
ATLANTA -- It was, as Dexter King kept saying, an "awkward" moment. What does a son say to the man who once confessed to killing his father?Twenty-nine years after the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the civil rights leader's son met yesterday with a dying James Earl Ray.The two men shook hands and made small talk.And then King, looking Ray in the eye, slid ever so gently toward the heart of the matter. He asked the question he'd traveled from Atlanta to a Nashville, Tenn., prison hospital to ask: "Did you kill my father?"
NEWS
April 24, 1998
HE SLEW the dreamer. Or so it was said of James Earl Ray, convicted of murder in the 1968 slaying of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. But Ray, who died a prisoner Thursday after years of suffering from hepatitis, claimed he wasn't the one.He confessed to the crime to avoid capital punishment, but within days recanted. Nonetheless, no trial occurred.The death of Ray probably means the questions he continued to raise about Dr. King's death will never be answered. That is a blow that will be felt most by the King family, which, in recent months, announced that it believed Ray and joined his unsuccessful effort to receive a trial.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 5, 1997
This is a hard one to write, inasmuch as I have to scold what may be black America's first family: the survivors of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.But it has to be said, so here goes. Dexter King, son of Martin Luther King Jr., is a sap. There's simply no other word for it. And just because Dexter is Dr. King's son doesn't make him any less of a sap. The truth is, Dexter's dad had some sappy moments of his own.Take, for example, the elder King's well-known statement during the civil rights struggle in which he suggested to white racists that they could beat, bludgeon, shoot, hang and bomb black folks, who would be forgiving of all these atrocities.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 1997
ATLANTA -- It was, as Dexter King kept saying, an "awkward" moment. What does a son say to the man who once confessed to killing his father?Twenty-nine years after the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the civil rights leader's son met yesterday with a dying James Earl Ray.The two men shook hands and made small talk.And then King, looking Ray in the eye, slid ever so gently toward the heart of the matter. He asked the question he'd traveled from Atlanta to a Nashville, Tenn., prison hospital to ask: "Did you kill my father?"
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1996
When we last heard from Mike Gabriel, the Pikesville resident had just broken off a much publicized engagement to Rosa Lopez, O.J. Simpson's housekeeper. Sad to say, Lopez was allergic to cats, precluding a life with Gabriel, an instructor of the ancient art of Cat-Yoga.The fleeting romance was dutifully reported by everyone from Vanity Fair to Jay Leno. Just another strange footnote in the strange spectacle of the Simpson trial. Except for this: None of it was true.Gabriel, a part-time candy store clerk and movie extra with a genius for self-promotion, had manufactured the whole thing.
NEWS
By CARL ROWAN | April 7, 1993
Washington. -- So the jury in HBO's gripping mock trial has declared that James Earl Ray did not murder Martin Luther King Jr.I am not surprised, because I don't believe any open-minded person can look at the evidence presented and conclude that Ray alone committed one of the most shocking murders of the century.This absorbing HBO ''trial'' is a great public service, because it makes available to ordinary Americans facts, evidence, testimony that make it clear that while Ray is a scoundrel, he is also the pawn, the fall guy, in a murder perpetrated by powerful law-enforcement figures who could manipulate the courts, lawyers and politicians.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 2, 1993
James Earl Ray, the confessed killer of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., says it's a great TV show.The question is why was he asked in the first place.Ray was asked because HBO's "Guilt or Innocence: The Trial of James Earl Ray," which airs Sunday night at 8, goes beyond mere blurring of the lines between fact and fiction, reality and entertainment. The mock trial of Ray obliterates the lines. Once you get this far into shaking and baking history into a show-biz cutlet, why not ask Ray himself for a critique of the telecast and see how strange things can get?
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 3, 1992
Bethesda Hardly anyone noticed when National Press Books came out with its first book, "Employees' Rights in Plain English," in 1985. The same was true for most of the other approximately 40 books put out since by the Bethesda-based publisher: "The Glove Compartment Book," say, or "The Bank-Hater's Handbook."But give the world James Earl Ray, and the world will beat a path to your door.Ever since Ray's memoir, "Who Killed Martin Luther King?" was published last November by National Press, more and more people have heard of the small, independent publishing house that mostly specialized in self-help books before branching out the past few years to national-interest books.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 3, 1992
Bethesda -- HARDLY ANYONE noticed when National Press Books came out with its first book, "Employees' Rights in Plain English," in 1985. The same was true for most of the other approximately 40 books put out since by the Bethesda-based publisher: "The Glove Compartment Book," say, or "The Bank-Hater's Handbook."But give the world James Earl Ray, and the world will beat a path to your door.Ever since Ray's memoir, "Who Killed Martin Luther King?" was published last November by National Press, more and more people have heard of the small, independent publishing house that mostly specialized in self-help books before branching out the past few years to national-interest books.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 18, 1993
Los Angeles -- Blame it on Oliver Stone and "JFK" or, maybe, the seemingly insatiable appetite of prime-time TV for low-cost "reality" programs that generate great profits these days.Fox Broadcasting -- the network of Al Bundy and Bart Simpson -- is getting into the investigative journalism business this week with "Who Killed Martin Luther King?" The report, with actor Larry Fishburne as host, is to air at 9 p.m. Friday on WBFF (Channel 45).The report suggests that James Earl Ray, the man convicted of killing King in Memphis in 1968, was not the gunman and that King's assassination was the result of a conspiracy involving the FBI. In a sense, it's "JFK" with Ray replacing Lee Harvey Oswald in the scenario.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 3, 1992
Bethesda -- HARDLY ANYONE noticed when National Press Books came out with its first book, "Employees' Rights in Plain English," in 1985. The same was true for most of the other approximately 40 books put out since by the Bethesda-based publisher: "The Glove Compartment Book," say, or "The Bank-Hater's Handbook."But give the world James Earl Ray, and the world will beat a path to your door.Ever since Ray's memoir, "Who Killed Martin Luther King?" was published last November by National Press, more and more people have heard of the small, independent publishing house that mostly specialized in self-help books before branching out the past few years to national-interest books.
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