Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJames Dobson
IN THE NEWS

James Dobson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 18, 2008
The California Supreme Court's ruling that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry drew high praise and withering condemnation. "Essentially, this boils down to love. We love each other. We now have equal rights under the law. We're going to get married." - ROBIN TYLER, a plaintiff in the case along with her partner. "What an outrage. It will be up to the people of California to preserve traditional marriage by passing a constitutional amendment." - JAMES DOBSON, chairman of Colorado-based Focus on the Family "As California goes, so goes the rest of the nation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2008
The California Supreme Court's ruling that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry drew high praise and withering condemnation. "Essentially, this boils down to love. We love each other. We now have equal rights under the law. We're going to get married." - ROBIN TYLER, a plaintiff in the case along with her partner. "What an outrage. It will be up to the people of California to preserve traditional marriage by passing a constitutional amendment." - JAMES DOBSON, chairman of Colorado-based Focus on the Family "As California goes, so goes the rest of the nation.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Cokie Roberts & Steven V. Roberts | April 20, 1995
Colorado Springs, Colo. -- MENTION the name James Dobson in the media circles of Washington or Los Angeles and you're likely to receive a blank stare. One or two might think he was a pitcher for the Chicago Cubs, but that was Chuck Dobson. No relation.James Dobson is a child psychologist and surrogate pastor, book writer and radio broadcaster, based in Colorado Springs. His daily, half-hour shows, called "Focus on the Family" (and nine other spin-offs) are carried 8,000 times a week on 1,500 stations.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 18, 2005
WASHINGTON -- When first lady Laura Bush was asked on NBC's Today if she detected sexism in the rising criticism of the Harriet Miers nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, her answer must have brought smiles to those whom Rush Limbaugh once tagged as "femi-Nazis." "I think that's possible," the first lady said. Instantly she bonded, whether she knew it or not, with Eleanor Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority Foundation, who also tagged Ms. Miers' critics with the S-word. Yet one does not have to be a male chauvinist piggy to question whether a man would have fared any better if he had Ms. Miers' meager judicial experience, nonexistent scholarly work and lack of an ideological record beyond a friendship with President Bush that's "thisclose."
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic Party suffered serious defections in both the 1984 and 1988 presidential elections because of the perception that Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis had made too many concessions to Jesse Jackson.The perception wasn't accurate but that was beside the point. The operative thing was that many middleclass white voters -- these were the "Reagan Democrats" -- believed the black civil rights leader enjoyed too much influence on their party.These days, the Republican Party is in precisely the same position in dealing with leaders of the religious right.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 18, 2005
WASHINGTON -- When first lady Laura Bush was asked on NBC's Today if she detected sexism in the rising criticism of the Harriet Miers nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, her answer must have brought smiles to those whom Rush Limbaugh once tagged as "femi-Nazis." "I think that's possible," the first lady said. Instantly she bonded, whether she knew it or not, with Eleanor Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority Foundation, who also tagged Ms. Miers' critics with the S-word. Yet one does not have to be a male chauvinist piggy to question whether a man would have fared any better if he had Ms. Miers' meager judicial experience, nonexistent scholarly work and lack of an ideological record beyond a friendship with President Bush that's "thisclose."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2001
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Inside a radio studio, James Dobson - founder of the conservative Christian organization Focus on the Family - was taping his daily program with a woman who adopted her 2-year-old daughter when the child was a frozen embryo. Dobson, who believes firmly that life begins at fertilization, cautioned his listeners not to be swayed by scientists who say embryos are nothing but "dots." "It's amazing to me how many Christians are coming down on that side," Dobson said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Before President Bush nominated White House counsel Harriet E. Miers to the Supreme Court, his deputy chief of staff, Karl Rove, called influential Christian leader James Dobson to assure him that Miers was a conservative evangelical Christian, Dobson said in remarks scheduled for broadcast today on his national radio show. In that conversation, which has been the subject of feverish speculation, Rove also told Dobson that one reason the president was passing over better-known conservatives was that many on the White House shortlist had asked not to be considered, Dobson said, according to an advance transcript of the broadcast provided by his organization, Focus on the Family.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | September 18, 1998
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- The people at the World Prayer Center describe their sleek new building as a base for waging spiritual warfare."Missionaries are the ground troops," says the Rev. Joseph TTC Thompson, director of the World Prayer Center, a new $5.5 million building endorsed by an array of evangelical groups. "Prayer is the air war in our battle."The World Prayer Center, officially opening this weekend, is expected to become the nerve center of an emerging worldwide prayer movement.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Contributing Writer | November 15, 1993
The Concert Artists of Baltimore inaugurated its seventh season under Artistic Director Edward Polochick with an ambitiously varied and challenging program. American composer John Adam's "Shaker 6,7l Loops," Handel's "Dixit Dominus" and Tchaikovsky's "Serenade for Strings" require the utmost in virtuosic execution and that is what the Concert Artists of Baltimore provided in abundance Saturday night at LeClerc Hall.The centerpiece of the evening was Handel's setting of Psalm 110, "Dixit Dominus," composed for solo voices, chorus and string orchestra.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2001
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Inside a radio studio, James Dobson - founder of the conservative Christian organization Focus on the Family - was taping his daily program with a woman who adopted her 2-year-old daughter when the child was a frozen embryo. Dobson, who believes firmly that life begins at fertilization, cautioned his listeners not to be swayed by scientists who say embryos are nothing but "dots." "It's amazing to me how many Christians are coming down on that side," Dobson said.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic Party suffered serious defections in both the 1984 and 1988 presidential elections because of the perception that Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis had made too many concessions to Jesse Jackson.The perception wasn't accurate but that was beside the point. The operative thing was that many middleclass white voters -- these were the "Reagan Democrats" -- believed the black civil rights leader enjoyed too much influence on their party.These days, the Republican Party is in precisely the same position in dealing with leaders of the religious right.
NEWS
By Cokie Roberts & Steven V. Roberts | April 20, 1995
Colorado Springs, Colo. -- MENTION the name James Dobson in the media circles of Washington or Los Angeles and you're likely to receive a blank stare. One or two might think he was a pitcher for the Chicago Cubs, but that was Chuck Dobson. No relation.James Dobson is a child psychologist and surrogate pastor, book writer and radio broadcaster, based in Colorado Springs. His daily, half-hour shows, called "Focus on the Family" (and nine other spin-offs) are carried 8,000 times a week on 1,500 stations.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1995
Despite Planned Parenthood of Maryland's protest that it contains factual inaccuracies, WJZ-TV (Channel 13) will air "Sex, Lies and the Truth," a program produced by a conservative religious group to promote teen-age sexual abstinence."
NEWS
By RICHARD SCHMITT and RICHARD SCHMITT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 10, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Arlen Specter, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, offered an unusual defense yesterday of Supreme Court nominee Harriet E. Miers, saying her critics had put together "one of the toughest lynch mobs" he had ever seen. "What you've had here on Harriet Miers is not a rush to judgment. It's a stampede to judgment," Specter said on the ABC News' This Week. Miers was being attacked by "one of the toughest lynch mobs ever assembled in Washington, D.C., and we really assemble some tough lynch mobs," said Specter, a Pennsylvania Republican.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.