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By Jackie Potts and Jackie Potts,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 4, 1995
For a hint as to what's rarely right with children's movies these days, consider the recent rash of talking pig movies: "Gordy," an unbearable oinker about the Donald Trump of swine, and now "Babe," a winning, whimsical fable about an orphaned piglet who grows up to be, of all things, a blue-ribbon sheep dog.Both are summer films starring fuzzy white pigs in preposterous situations. So why does "Babe" sing where "Gordy" merely squeals? For many, the difference can be summed up in four words -- Jim Henson's Creature Shop.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Abele and Robert Abele,Special to the Los Angeles Times | October 16, 2008
Friends told him not to do it. He'd even turned it down once. The possible maelstrom of partisan controversy weighed on him. But in deciding to play the Decider for Oliver Stone's new satirical biopic, W., which opens in theaters tomorrow, Josh Brolin relied on a very non-President Bush-like standard: doubt. Unlike the 43rd president of the United States, a man fatally confident of his actions, Brolin wasn't sure he could pull it off. As he explained recently, being scared puts him in a good place.
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FEATURES
By Helene Lorber and Helene Lorber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 29, 1998
If life goes by too fast for you, I know how to ratchet it down: watch "The Education of Little Tree." A time and place when life was slow inspires a movie that is slower still.The stately pace is not entirely out of place. East Tennessee never looked so beautiful. "Little Tree" celebrates its mountains in every detail, from green, fern-tangled paths to vistas of fog lying heavy in the high valleys.The characters provide scarcely more action than the fluttering leaves, yet the camera lingers on them, too. Stoic and internal mountain people that they are, they say little.
NEWS
June 21, 2006
Jermaine Nelson "Harold" Cromwell Jr., a former nursing home supervisor, died of cancer Saturday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 36. Born in Baltimore and raised on Glenwood Avenue, he was a 1986 honors graduate of Northern High School. He later studied at the Control Data Institute. Mr. Cromwell was a therapist at St. Joseph Medical Center and then became a supervisor at Brighton Manor, later Blue Point Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, on Dukeland Street in West Baltimore. He retired two years ago because of ill health.
NEWS
June 21, 2006
Jermaine Nelson "Harold" Cromwell Jr., a former nursing home supervisor, died of cancer Saturday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 36. Born in Baltimore and raised on Glenwood Avenue, he was a 1986 honors graduate of Northern High School. He later studied at the Control Data Institute. Mr. Cromwell was a therapist at St. Joseph Medical Center and then became a supervisor at Brighton Manor, later Blue Point Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, on Dukeland Street in West Baltimore. He retired two years ago because of ill health.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
CBS has itself one intriguing lineup tonight, with the return of two shows for a final go-round before they fade into TV oblivion (and syndicated reruns). One is a much-admired and much-honored series quietly ending its three-season run. The other was the biggest bomb of 1995."Party for the Planet" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Shari Belafonte is the host for this fourth annual show recognizing young people who have contributed to Earth's ecological well-being. Guests include Reba McEntire, Celine Dion and actor James Cromwell (Oscar-nominated for "Babe")
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 25, 1998
A review of "Babe: Pig in the City" in yesterday's Today section incorrectly said that actress E. G. Daily supplied the title character's voice in both the new movie and the original. Daily provided the voice in the latest movie, but Christine Cavanaugh did the voice in the 1995 original.The Sun regrets the errors.Admirers of "Babe," the 1995 movie that introduced an uncommonly charismatic Large White Yorkshire pig as a sweet, stout-hearted hero, won't be disappointed by its sequel, even if the new film doesn't quite match its predecessor's wonder and innocence.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 24, 2002
Cross Walt Disney with John Ford and you'd get Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron. Except those two master filmmakers would come up with a far more engaging film than this gorgeous, but otherwise nondescript, horse opera. DreamWorks has positioned Spirit as the film that will save traditional animation as we've known it - no small task, given that all the great crowd-pleasers of the past six years or so (Toy Story, Shrek, Monsters Inc., etc.) have relied on computer animation to tell their stories, while films drawn by hand (Hercules, Atlantis, El Dorado)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 31, 2002
The Sum of All Fears is as self-important as the American president at the center of it, who worries more about his place in history than about how to save his country from apocalypse. It's the fourth film in the Tom Clancy-based CIA adventure series featuring the smart, courageous analyst Jack Ryan. All it takes from Clancy's 914-page 1991 novel is the detonation of a nuclear device at a championship football game and Ryan's struggle to convince his commander-in-chief that the Russian government isn't responsible.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 27, 2005
Brainless fun" was the men's-room consensus after a promo screening for The Longest Yard. But is that a diagnosis or a rave? It takes mere minutes for this remake of 1974's hit action comedy to detach the thinking part of your brain from the rest of your nervous system. I laughed at the dumb, grotesque gags. I also thought, "This is how Pavlov's dog must have felt." The filmmakers base the physical humor solely on the idea that pain is funny when it visits someone else. There's nothing graceful about it. In both Robert Aldrich's original version and this new one from Adam Sandler's frequent collaborator, Peter Segal (Anger Management)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 27, 2005
Brainless fun" was the men's-room consensus after a promo screening for The Longest Yard. But is that a diagnosis or a rave? It takes mere minutes for this remake of 1974's hit action comedy to detach the thinking part of your brain from the rest of your nervous system. I laughed at the dumb, grotesque gags. I also thought, "This is how Pavlov's dog must have felt." The filmmakers base the physical humor solely on the idea that pain is funny when it visits someone else. There's nothing graceful about it. In both Robert Aldrich's original version and this new one from Adam Sandler's frequent collaborator, Peter Segal (Anger Management)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 31, 2002
The Sum of All Fears is as self-important as the American president at the center of it, who worries more about his place in history than about how to save his country from apocalypse. It's the fourth film in the Tom Clancy-based CIA adventure series featuring the smart, courageous analyst Jack Ryan. All it takes from Clancy's 914-page 1991 novel is the detonation of a nuclear device at a championship football game and Ryan's struggle to convince his commander-in-chief that the Russian government isn't responsible.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 24, 2002
Cross Walt Disney with John Ford and you'd get Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron. Except those two master filmmakers would come up with a far more engaging film than this gorgeous, but otherwise nondescript, horse opera. DreamWorks has positioned Spirit as the film that will save traditional animation as we've known it - no small task, given that all the great crowd-pleasers of the past six years or so (Toy Story, Shrek, Monsters Inc., etc.) have relied on computer animation to tell their stories, while films drawn by hand (Hercules, Atlantis, El Dorado)
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 25, 1998
A review of "Babe: Pig in the City" in yesterday's Today section incorrectly said that actress E. G. Daily supplied the title character's voice in both the new movie and the original. Daily provided the voice in the latest movie, but Christine Cavanaugh did the voice in the 1995 original.The Sun regrets the errors.Admirers of "Babe," the 1995 movie that introduced an uncommonly charismatic Large White Yorkshire pig as a sweet, stout-hearted hero, won't be disappointed by its sequel, even if the new film doesn't quite match its predecessor's wonder and innocence.
FEATURES
By Helene Lorber and Helene Lorber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 29, 1998
If life goes by too fast for you, I know how to ratchet it down: watch "The Education of Little Tree." A time and place when life was slow inspires a movie that is slower still.The stately pace is not entirely out of place. East Tennessee never looked so beautiful. "Little Tree" celebrates its mountains in every detail, from green, fern-tangled paths to vistas of fog lying heavy in the high valleys.The characters provide scarcely more action than the fluttering leaves, yet the camera lingers on them, too. Stoic and internal mountain people that they are, they say little.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1996
"Star Trek" has become creepy. This is a good thing."Star Trek: First Contact" is the eight hundredth -- er, the eighth "Trek" movie to date and the second film outing by the "Next Generation" crew, mercifully without help from Bill Shatner this time. And it has mastered creepiness.There are also some fine outer-space pyrotechnics when humanity faces its "most mortal enemy," as Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) describes the Borg in his great, resonant voice. The Borg, for the uninitiated, look as if they have vacuum cleaners growing out of their heads.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1996
"Star Trek" has become creepy. This is a good thing."Star Trek: First Contact" is the eight hundredth -- er, the eighth "Trek" movie to date and the second film outing by the "Next Generation" crew, mercifully without help from Bill Shatner this time. And it has mastered creepiness.There are also some fine outer-space pyrotechnics when humanity faces its "most mortal enemy," as Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) describes the Borg in his great, resonant voice. The Borg, for the uninitiated, look as if they have vacuum cleaners growing out of their heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Abele and Robert Abele,Special to the Los Angeles Times | October 16, 2008
Friends told him not to do it. He'd even turned it down once. The possible maelstrom of partisan controversy weighed on him. But in deciding to play the Decider for Oliver Stone's new satirical biopic, W., which opens in theaters tomorrow, Josh Brolin relied on a very non-President Bush-like standard: doubt. Unlike the 43rd president of the United States, a man fatally confident of his actions, Brolin wasn't sure he could pull it off. As he explained recently, being scared puts him in a good place.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
CBS has itself one intriguing lineup tonight, with the return of two shows for a final go-round before they fade into TV oblivion (and syndicated reruns). One is a much-admired and much-honored series quietly ending its three-season run. The other was the biggest bomb of 1995."Party for the Planet" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Shari Belafonte is the host for this fourth annual show recognizing young people who have contributed to Earth's ecological well-being. Guests include Reba McEntire, Celine Dion and actor James Cromwell (Oscar-nominated for "Babe")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jackie Potts and Jackie Potts,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 4, 1995
For a hint as to what's rarely right with children's movies these days, consider the recent rash of talking pig movies: "Gordy," an unbearable oinker about the Donald Trump of swine, and now "Babe," a winning, whimsical fable about an orphaned piglet who grows up to be, of all things, a blue-ribbon sheep dog.Both are summer films starring fuzzy white pigs in preposterous situations. So why does "Babe" sing where "Gordy" merely squeals? For many, the difference can be summed up in four words -- Jim Henson's Creature Shop.
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