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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 13, 2008
A posse full of soon-to-be-big-name movie stars comes out with guns a-blazing in John Sturges' 1960 The Magnificent Seven, airing at noon today on AMC. This tale of seven gunslingers (actually, six gun- and one knife-slinger) hired to protect a poor Mexican town from a band of nasty desperadoes is a classic for so many reasons: Elmer Bernstein's soaring score, Charles Lang's sparse cinematography, and a cast of then-unknowns, including Robert Vaughn, Charles Bronson and James Coburn (who plays Britt, the guy with the knife)
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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 13, 2008
A posse full of soon-to-be-big-name movie stars comes out with guns a-blazing in John Sturges' 1960 The Magnificent Seven, airing at noon today on AMC. This tale of seven gunslingers (actually, six gun- and one knife-slinger) hired to protect a poor Mexican town from a band of nasty desperadoes is a classic for so many reasons: Elmer Bernstein's soaring score, Charles Lang's sparse cinematography, and a cast of then-unknowns, including Robert Vaughn, Charles Bronson and James Coburn (who plays Britt, the guy with the knife)
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 22, 2002
Few actors could be as effortlessly dominant as the late James Coburn, the subject of a three-film tribute airing Sunday night on Turner Classic Movies. And nowhere was that talent better displayed than in the film that brought him his first taste of big-screen fame. Coburn, who died at age 74 Monday after suffering a heart attack at his Beverly Hills home, earned his acting stripes on television, appearing in dozens of dramas (often aired live) during the 1950s. But it was in John Sturges' 1960 Western, The Magnificent Seven (7:30 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 22, 2002
Few actors could be as effortlessly dominant as the late James Coburn, the subject of a three-film tribute airing Sunday night on Turner Classic Movies. And nowhere was that talent better displayed than in the film that brought him his first taste of big-screen fame. Coburn, who died at age 74 Monday after suffering a heart attack at his Beverly Hills home, earned his acting stripes on television, appearing in dozens of dramas (often aired live) during the 1950s. But it was in John Sturges' 1960 Western, The Magnificent Seven (7:30 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
The Learning Channel gives TV viewers the chance to spend a day cuddled up with some great books."Dangerous Minds" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Superteacher Louanne is suspended after a student's parents charge her with molesting their son. Her students and the faculty try to help, but don't. ABC."Dark Skies" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Loengard's fight against those nasty aliens continues; in fact, it's even more desperate, since they abducted Kimberly (Megan Ward) and his son. Tonight, he enlists crusading columnist Dorothy Kilgallen in the fight and ends up duking it out (verbally)
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | May 30, 1994
"The Flintstones," a live-action version of the cartoon, opened Friday. So what's new? Nothing, really. Seems as though we've seen and heard everything before, in some way, shape or form, from TV shows to movies and even to obnoxious beer commercials in which the perseverance of some pop forms is celebrated in tiresome conversation. Ginger or Mary Ann? Does it really matter?Well, maybe it does. Some things (including "Gilligan's Island," by the way, which is on tap for the big screen with Adam Sandler as Gilligan)
FEATURES
By Ruth Reichl and Ruth Reichl,Los Angeles Times | March 10, 1991
Roger Verge is holding court. The proprietor of the three-star Le Moulin de Mougins restaurant near Cannes, France, sits, his white mustache twitching slightly, while an editor from Architectural Digest pulls out photograph after photograph of Mr. Verge's home. He peers at the image of a lamp. "Ah yes," he says, caressing it with his hand. Like a good student, he begins cataloging its virtues. "I try to give pleasure to everyone," he whispers.Mr. Verge, "with his burnt-almond eyes, his white mustache, his noble bearing and his sweet words," is, as the "Guide Gault-Millau" somewhat caustically says, "the very incarnation of the great French chef for foreigners."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 20, 1998
ESPN is undergoing a little restructuring at its very top, with its current president getting a newly created position.Steve Bornstein, who has been president of ESPN for eight years, has been promoted to chairman of the ESPN empire, with his second-in-command, George Bodenheimer, becoming president.The move frees Bornstein, who also runs ABC Sports, to focus on growing the ESPN behemoth even larger, particularly on the foreign side, while Bodenheimer concentrates on the domestic operation.
NEWS
December 15, 2002
Brad Dexter, 85, an actor who rode with Yul Brynner in The Magnificent Seven and became a confidant of Marilyn Monroe and Frank Sinatra, died Thursday in Rancho Mirage, Calif. He had been hospitalized with emphysema. Burly and handsome, he was often cast as a tough guy in supporting roles, which included 1958's Run Silent, Run Deep, starring Burt Lancaster and Clark Gable, and 1965's None but the Brave, starring Mr. Sinatra. He made his film debut in the The Asphalt Jungle in 1950, but his most prominent role came in 1960's The Magnificent Seven, in which he starred with Mr. Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson and James Coburn.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 19, 1999
Nick Nolte delivers a ferocious performance as a man on the edge in "Affliction," Paul Schrader's sensitive and perfectly pitched adaptation of the Russell Banks novel. As Wade Whitehouse, a well-digger and part-time policeman living in a tiny New England town, Nolte lends enormous heft and ballast to this human-scale drama, and his portrayal of Wade, which spans the spectrum of human emotion from roaring rage to howling, wounded pain, has landed him a deserved Oscar nomination.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 20, 1998
ESPN is undergoing a little restructuring at its very top, with its current president getting a newly created position.Steve Bornstein, who has been president of ESPN for eight years, has been promoted to chairman of the ESPN empire, with his second-in-command, George Bodenheimer, becoming president.The move frees Bornstein, who also runs ABC Sports, to focus on growing the ESPN behemoth even larger, particularly on the foreign side, while Bodenheimer concentrates on the domestic operation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
The Learning Channel gives TV viewers the chance to spend a day cuddled up with some great books."Dangerous Minds" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Superteacher Louanne is suspended after a student's parents charge her with molesting their son. Her students and the faculty try to help, but don't. ABC."Dark Skies" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Loengard's fight against those nasty aliens continues; in fact, it's even more desperate, since they abducted Kimberly (Megan Ward) and his son. Tonight, he enlists crusading columnist Dorothy Kilgallen in the fight and ends up duking it out (verbally)
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | May 30, 1994
"The Flintstones," a live-action version of the cartoon, opened Friday. So what's new? Nothing, really. Seems as though we've seen and heard everything before, in some way, shape or form, from TV shows to movies and even to obnoxious beer commercials in which the perseverance of some pop forms is celebrated in tiresome conversation. Ginger or Mary Ann? Does it really matter?Well, maybe it does. Some things (including "Gilligan's Island," by the way, which is on tap for the big screen with Adam Sandler as Gilligan)
FEATURES
By Ruth Reichl and Ruth Reichl,Los Angeles Times | March 10, 1991
Roger Verge is holding court. The proprietor of the three-star Le Moulin de Mougins restaurant near Cannes, France, sits, his white mustache twitching slightly, while an editor from Architectural Digest pulls out photograph after photograph of Mr. Verge's home. He peers at the image of a lamp. "Ah yes," he says, caressing it with his hand. Like a good student, he begins cataloging its virtues. "I try to give pleasure to everyone," he whispers.Mr. Verge, "with his burnt-almond eyes, his white mustache, his noble bearing and his sweet words," is, as the "Guide Gault-Millau" somewhat caustically says, "the very incarnation of the great French chef for foreigners."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
It's World War II all over again on TCM, spotlighting a trio of big-scale, big-budget, big-cast war epics. The first two hail from the early 1960s, when such films were all the rage. At 5:15 p.m., J. Lee Thompson's The Guns of Navarone (1961) features Gregory Peck, David Niven, Anthony Quayle, Anthony Quinn, Irene Papas and Richard Harris, all trying to rescue Greece from Axis domination by destroying a huge Nazi gun emplacement. At 8 p.m., Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence and James Coburn are among those behind John Sturges' The Great Escape (1963)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2007
NORBIT movies [Paramount] $30 The Eddie Murphy comedy Norbit proved to be critic-proof when it was released theatrically this year, achieving No. 1 status at the box office on its opening weekend despite tepid reviews. Now it's out on DVD. Murphy is back to his old tricks -- donning tons of makeup and a fat suit -- to play three roles in a comedy about a timid young man (Murphy), married to a mean-tempered woman (also Murphy), who has a second chance at love when his childhood sweetheart (Thandie Newton)
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