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NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 24, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - His past as a spiritual leader of this town stripped away and replaced with an inmate's jumpsuit, 80-year-old Edgar Ray Killen was sentenced yesterday to the maximum of 60 years for the killing of three civil rights workers in 1964. Judge Marcus Gordon ordered the penalty against the former Ku Klux Klan leader for the deaths of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner. He said Killen was receiving 20 years of punishment for each man. "The three lives should absolutely be respected and treated equally," Gordon said, in a legal principle that is echoed in the principles that the rights workers advocated.
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NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | June 26, 2005
THE DAY James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner disappeared, June 21, 1964, I was a young officer in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps, serving in the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) with the 1st Calvary Division. News from the United States was hard to come by because we had no television, radio or newspapers except the military's Stars and Stripes, which the Army gave us monthly. I first learned, through another black officer, of the murders of the three civil rights activists after their bodies had been found 44 days after their disappearance.
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NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 21, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - The jury in the murder trial of Edgar Ray Killen told the judge yesterday it was deadlocked after less than three hours, setting the stage for further deliberations on the 41st anniversary of the killings of civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman. The jury of nine whites and three blacks deliberated until early evening before announcing to Judge Marcus Gordon that it was deadlocked 6-6 over the murder and manslaughter charges that the 80-year-old former Ku Klux Klan leader and Baptist preacher faces.
NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 24, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - His past as a spiritual leader of this town stripped away and replaced with an inmate's jumpsuit, 80-year-old Edgar Ray Killen was sentenced yesterday to the maximum of 60 years for the killing of three civil rights workers in 1964. Judge Marcus Gordon ordered the penalty against the former Ku Klux Klan leader for the deaths of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner. He said Killen was receiving 20 years of punishment for each man. "The three lives should absolutely be respected and treated equally," Gordon said, in a legal principle that is echoed in the principles that the rights workers advocated.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | June 26, 2005
THE DAY James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner disappeared, June 21, 1964, I was a young officer in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps, serving in the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) with the 1st Calvary Division. News from the United States was hard to come by because we had no television, radio or newspapers except the military's Stars and Stripes, which the Army gave us monthly. I first learned, through another black officer, of the murders of the three civil rights activists after their bodies had been found 44 days after their disappearance.
NEWS
By Lianne Hart and Lianne Hart,LOS ANGLES TIMES | June 17, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - Testimony in the murder trial of former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen was put on hold yesterday when the 80-year-old was rushed to a hospital by ambulance, complaining of a "smothering sensation" in his chest. Doctors at Neshoba County General Hospital said they treated Killen for high blood pressure likely related to injuries he sustained in March when a tree he was cutting toppled on his head and broke both legs. Though Killen's condition is "not serious," he was to spend the night in the intensive care unit as a precaution, said Dr. Patrick Eakes, the internist who is overseeing Killen's care.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 21, 2000
Now that the Baltimore Playwrights Festival is producing its fifth play by Carol Weinberg, audiences know they can expect certain things. Her dialogue will have a natural-sounding flow. Her characters will be recognizable. And her themes will be serious and relevant. All of these characteristics apply to Weinberg's "Freedom Summer," currently receiving a forceful production at the Vagabond Players. Although the play is set in 1964, when the civil rights struggle was raging and women's liberation was just a glimmer, the play's central theme of taking a stand and acting on your beliefs will never be dated.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 14, 1999
I FLIP the book open to its very first page and gaze at the handwriting on it."To Gregory, my best -- James Farmer."The book is Farmer's "Lay Bare The Heart: An Autobiography of the Civil Rights Movement." It was published in 1985. Four or five years later, Farmer was in Baltimore to speak at the Gilman School. I weaseled out of work that day to listen the man who might have been the most underrated and unheralded of America's civil rights leaders and to get him to autograph my copy of his book.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 10, 2000
Baltimore Playwrights Festival veteran Carol Weinberg returns to the festival this summer with a play grounded in the Civil Rights struggle. "Freedom Summer," which opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players, tells the story of a housewife from Queens, N.Y., whose commonplace existence is upset by the disappearance of Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, three young men who volunteered to register voters in Mississippi in 1964. Lynda McClary stars as the housewife, and Matthew Bowerman portrays Goodman.
NEWS
November 10, 2002
Lawrence Andrew Rainey Sr., 79, the former county sheriff whose acquittal in the murders of three civil rights workers was chronicled in the movie Mississippi Burning, died Friday in Meridian, Miss. His wife said the cause was throat cancer. Neshoba County sheriff from 1963 to 1967, Mr. Rainey was charged with civil rights violations for allegedly conspiring to kill James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner in 1964. Their bodies were found buried in an earthen dam a few miles from the church; the men had been beaten and shot.
NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 21, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - The jury in the murder trial of Edgar Ray Killen told the judge yesterday it was deadlocked after less than three hours, setting the stage for further deliberations on the 41st anniversary of the killings of civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, James Chaney and Andrew Goodman. The jury of nine whites and three blacks deliberated until early evening before announcing to Judge Marcus Gordon that it was deadlocked 6-6 over the murder and manslaughter charges that the 80-year-old former Ku Klux Klan leader and Baptist preacher faces.
NEWS
By Lianne Hart and Lianne Hart,LOS ANGLES TIMES | June 17, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - Testimony in the murder trial of former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen was put on hold yesterday when the 80-year-old was rushed to a hospital by ambulance, complaining of a "smothering sensation" in his chest. Doctors at Neshoba County General Hospital said they treated Killen for high blood pressure likely related to injuries he sustained in March when a tree he was cutting toppled on his head and broke both legs. Though Killen's condition is "not serious," he was to spend the night in the intensive care unit as a precaution, said Dr. Patrick Eakes, the internist who is overseeing Killen's care.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 21, 2000
Now that the Baltimore Playwrights Festival is producing its fifth play by Carol Weinberg, audiences know they can expect certain things. Her dialogue will have a natural-sounding flow. Her characters will be recognizable. And her themes will be serious and relevant. All of these characteristics apply to Weinberg's "Freedom Summer," currently receiving a forceful production at the Vagabond Players. Although the play is set in 1964, when the civil rights struggle was raging and women's liberation was just a glimmer, the play's central theme of taking a stand and acting on your beliefs will never be dated.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 14, 1999
I FLIP the book open to its very first page and gaze at the handwriting on it."To Gregory, my best -- James Farmer."The book is Farmer's "Lay Bare The Heart: An Autobiography of the Civil Rights Movement." It was published in 1985. Four or five years later, Farmer was in Baltimore to speak at the Gilman School. I weaseled out of work that day to listen the man who might have been the most underrated and unheralded of America's civil rights leaders and to get him to autograph my copy of his book.
FEATURES
August 4, 2001
In 1892, Andrew and Abby Borden were axed to death in their home in Fall River, Mass. Lizzie Borden, Andrew Borden's daughter from a previous marriage, was accused of the killings but was acquitted at trial. In 1914, Britain declared war on Germany while the United States proclaimed its neutrality. In 1944, Nazi police raided the secret annex of a building in Amsterdam and arrested eight people - including 15-year-old Anne Frank, whose diary became a famous account of the Holocaust. In 1964, the bodies of civil rights workers Michael H. Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James E. Chaney were found buried in an earthen dam in Mississippi.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2005
ATLANTA - Mississippi's attorney general has challenged a judge's decision to grant bail to former Ku Klux Klan member Edgar Ray Killen, who was freed from prison Friday, less than two months into his 60-year sentence. Killen was convicted in June of three counts of manslaughter in the 1964 deaths of civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner. In an emergency petition to the state Supreme Court, submitted Monday night, Attorney General Jim Hood argued that Killen, 80, remains a violent and dangerous man. Hood said that a Killen relative made death threats against Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon and that an anonymous caller threatened to bomb the courthouse.
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