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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 28, 2007
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- More than a month after the death of the legendary soul singer James Brown, his body has not been laid to rest, a circumstance that has dismayed his friends and bewildered residents here in the town that has honored him as a native son. "He wrote a song about this," said Charles A. Reid Jr., a funeral director and lifelong friend who has custody of Brown's body while his survivors and the trustees of his estate squabble over control....
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SPORTS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
CBS News said there were no conditions placed on the interview with ex-NFL star and admitted dog killer Michael Vick that will air Sunday. A spokesman also said that even though CBS Sports host James Brown has never done a report for "60 Minutes," he earned the right to do the Vick piece by getting the interview on his own. In my first post about the interview, I raised questions about the choice of Brown rather than one of the CBS News correspondents who...
FEATURES
December 11, 2004
James Brown announces he has prostate cancer James Brown, the "Godfather of Soul" and a legend in rap, rock and funk, has announced that he has prostate cancer. In a statement released to the Associated Press yesterday morning, Brown, 71, said that he will undergo surgery for the ailment Wednesday. "I have overcome a lot of things in my life. I will overcome this as well," Brown said. Brown, best known for seminal hits like "I Feel Good," "Please, Please, Please" and "Cold Sweat," is also a diabetic.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 24, 1992
The Winter Olympics are over, but there is one more set of medals to be awarded -- for the television coverage. And I'm just the guy to do it.OK, maybe I'm not the guy to do it. But I'm the guy who's going to do it. So there.In the spirit of the Olympic movement, no network flag will be raised when the award winners mount the platform. And because all the versions of Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" are still in Albertville, instead the winners will hear a recording of Arnold Stang reciting Keats' "Ode on a Grecian Urn" (yeah, I know, about $2.50 an hour)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | February 19, 2004
His singing voice and the one in my ear are not the same. Joel Virgel is calling from his Los Angeles home, his thick French accent dicing his words. But on his debut, Amour Amer (which hit stores Tuesday), the dude is quite the seducer, breathily crooning in a mink-soft voice romantic lyrics that ride balmy, Brazilian-kissed grooves. As we talk about the project two weeks before its release, the Paris-raised artist doesn't sound so confident. "Do you think it'll be successful?" he asks.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
Milton Washington's daily routine at his carryout and deli at North Avenue and Longwood Street began this way: He'd arrive at 5: 30 a.m., brew a pot of coffee, put on some James Brown music and ease into the workday."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 2, 1993
ACROSS THE BORDERLINEWillie Nelson (Columbia 52752)Considering that he's already sung alongside everyone from Faron Young to Julio Iglesias, Willie Nelson's duet partners on "Across the Borderline" -- Bob Dylan, Bonnie Raitt, Paul Simon and Sinead O'Connor -- won't raise many eyebrows. But what he does with them might, because for the most part, Nelson tries to meet them on their own turf. It doesn't always work; as well as Nelson's voice blends with O'Connor's, neither gets much out of Peter Gabriel's "Don't Give Up."
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 10, 2007
"If hip-hop is dead, then let it rest in peace and let's move on to something else," said Black Thought, the smart rapper and sometimes-aloof mouthpiece for the hip-hop band the Roots. He and the other eight members of the Philadelphia collective brought their musically sprawling show to the Lyric Opera House on Thursday night. For nearly two hours, they celebrated the dead (James Brown) and dying (the artistic relevance of hip-hop). But it wasn't clear what they thought the "next movement" will be. The funereal air of the show was, in a way, an extension of the darkness that informs the Roots' latest album, the brilliant but heavy Game Theory.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun Reporter | May 4, 2007
OCEAN CITY --For decades, acclaimed black musicians and entertainers - Count Basie, Duke Ellington, a young James Brown - rubbed shoulders with less famous tenants in the brown-shingled boarding house known as Henry's Colored Hotel. There was hardly anywhere else they were allowed to stay.... Now, "the Henry" is getting its due, named yesterday by a group of dignitaries, black and white, as one of four African-American heritage landmarks on the Lower Eastern Shore. There's hope that with such recognition, the old hotel, which is in need of a paint job and other repairs, can be revived as a bed-and-breakfast and museum.
SPORTS
November 5, 1998
Sunday's gamesOakland at RavensRAIDERS: Out: RB John Henry Mills (hamstring-IR); S Eric Turner (foot). Doubtful: WR Kenny Shedd (shoulder). Questionable: QB Jeff George (groin); G Derrick Graham (ankle-knee).RAVENS: Out: RB Jay Graham (knee). Questionable: DE Rob Burnett (back). Probable: T Orlando Brown (ankle); WR Michael Jackson (finger); DT Tony Siragusa (ankle).Atlanta at New EnglandFALCONS: Out: CB Ronnie Bradford (knee); WR Tim Dwight (knee). Doubtful: DT Travis Hall (knee); WR Todd Kinchen (concussion)
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