Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJames Brady
IN THE NEWS

James Brady

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
It was a Sunday afternoon and I was on the phone to East Hampton, chatting with James Brady about his new novel, "Gin Lane." It's set in the Hamptons, a place he certainly knows something about, and is filled with all sorts of glamorous, real-life characters. But what I really wanted to know was Jim's secret for compressing celebrity lives into 550-word profiles in Parade magazine. The 12-year-old weekly column is called "In Step With." How does he do it?"I try to focus on the single one or two things that I hadn't known before," said Jim, 69. "And I try to get that up very close to the top of the story.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Sarah Brady, chairwoman of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, visited Annapolis Wednesday to meet with Gov. Martin O'Malley, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and legislative leaders and express her support for O'Malley's comprehensive gun legislation. Brady told reporters that among other things she planned to reassure Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, who has expressed misgivings about the part of the bill requiring licensing of handgun purchasers, that the provision does not conflict with the Second Amendment.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 16, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- About 15 years ago, Beau Bridges was in a coffee shop on Ventura Boulevard when a robber "put a gun between my eyes. I've never forgotten it. He went in the back, and I jumped up and sped out of the place and got the police."Mr. Bridges was lucky that day, but on March 30, 1981, James Brady was not. His life was changed forever when he stepped into the path of a bullet intended for the president of the United States.Mr. Bridges stars as Mr. Brady in "Without Warning: The James Brady Story," chronicling the true story of the former presidential press secretary, from his rise in politics to his critical injury to his triumphant recovery.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 28, 2010
James T. Brady put the "business" back in Maryland economic development. Before he took over as secretary of the Department of Business and Economic Development in the mid-1990s, the state agency was called the Department of Economic and Employment Development. Brady thought the name should make a nod to the private sector, which produces most of the jobs in the state. During his three years at the agency, Brady emphasized making Maryland more business-friendly at a time similar to this one, when the state was emerging from a severe recession.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | June 15, 1991
Let it be said up front: Beau Bridges' performance is simply extraordinary in "Without Warning: The James Brady Story," the high-profile world premiere cable movie about the feisty press secretary shot in the 1981 assassination attempt on President Reagan. (The HBO film premieres at 9 p.m. tomorrow on the premium network.)Joan Allen may even be better as Mr. Brady's wife, Sarah, whose crusade for gun control recently resulted in the House of Representatives' passage of the so-called "Brady Bill" that would require a waiting period for purchasers of handguns.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
THE LATE HARRY "Soft Shoes" McGuirk might have called him Diamond Jim in the political rough.The political ruminations of Maryland's former economic development boss, James T. Brady, remind many of 1978, when Harry R. Hughes rose from obscurity to victory by near acclamation. In the midst of a gubernatorial campaign which seems somnolent, Brady's water-testing this year is provocative.It was Senator McGuirk of the Stonewall Democratic Club in Baltimore who, in 1978, called Hughes a lost ball in tall grass.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- James Brady scanned the room with a professional eye and decided it was going to be a big day.There were 18 TV cameras set up in the House Judiciary Committee hearing room, and the number of cameras you attract in this town is one measure of your success.The last time James Brady was pushing the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act on Capitol Hill, only about eight cameras showed up.And members of the congressional leadership, who are critical for the bill's passage, were conspicuous in their absence.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1998
James T. Brady, former secretary of the state's Department of Business and Economic Development, has joined the board of directors at spice giant McCormick & Co. Inc. of Sparks.Brady, who resigned from his job as secretary in April, sits on numerous boards and serves as a consultant to the Johns Hopkins University."I think McCormick is a first-rate company and I enjoy being involved in strategic policy-making," Brady said. "McCormick is aggressively pursuing strategic alliances all around the world and hopefully I can be helpful in some of that strategizing."
NEWS
January 30, 2009
JAMES BRADY, 80 Columnist specialized in celebrities James Brady, the Parade magazine celebrity columnist whose wide-ranging career also included novels, a memoir of his Korean War service and a stint as publisher of the fashion bible Women's Wear Daily, died Monday at his Manhattan home. The cause of death was not disclosed. Mr. Brady wrote the celebrity profile column "In Step With" for Parade for nearly 25 years. He also was credited with initiating the New York Post's popular Page Six gossip section when he worked for publisher Rupert Murdoch in the 1970s.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 14, 1992
No thoughtful television viewer can avoid wondering about the link between the medium's preoccupation with violence and the rise of violent crime in society.Sarah Brady suggests that Hollywood is therefore an appropriate target for lobbying aimed at reducing TV's gunplay.Brady is the wife of James Brady, the press secretary to President Ronald Reagan seriously wounded in a 1981 Washington assassination attempt on his boss. She spoke to a Temple Oheb Shalom audience in Baltimore last week about the gun control effort of which she has become a national champion.
NEWS
January 30, 2009
JAMES BRADY, 80 Columnist specialized in celebrities James Brady, the Parade magazine celebrity columnist whose wide-ranging career also included novels, a memoir of his Korean War service and a stint as publisher of the fashion bible Women's Wear Daily, died Monday at his Manhattan home. The cause of death was not disclosed. Mr. Brady wrote the celebrity profile column "In Step With" for Parade for nearly 25 years. He also was credited with initiating the New York Post's popular Page Six gossip section when he worked for publisher Rupert Murdoch in the 1970s.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1998
James T. Brady, former secretary of the state's Department of Business and Economic Development, has joined the board of directors at spice giant McCormick & Co. Inc. of Sparks.Brady, who resigned from his job as secretary in April, sits on numerous boards and serves as a consultant to the Johns Hopkins University."I think McCormick is a first-rate company and I enjoy being involved in strategic policy-making," Brady said. "McCormick is aggressively pursuing strategic alliances all around the world and hopefully I can be helpful in some of that strategizing."
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
It was a Sunday afternoon and I was on the phone to East Hampton, chatting with James Brady about his new novel, "Gin Lane." It's set in the Hamptons, a place he certainly knows something about, and is filled with all sorts of glamorous, real-life characters. But what I really wanted to know was Jim's secret for compressing celebrity lives into 550-word profiles in Parade magazine. The 12-year-old weekly column is called "In Step With." How does he do it?"I try to focus on the single one or two things that I hadn't known before," said Jim, 69. "And I try to get that up very close to the top of the story.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
THE LATE HARRY "Soft Shoes" McGuirk might have called him Diamond Jim in the political rough.The political ruminations of Maryland's former economic development boss, James T. Brady, remind many of 1978, when Harry R. Hughes rose from obscurity to victory by near acclamation. In the midst of a gubernatorial campaign which seems somnolent, Brady's water-testing this year is provocative.It was Senator McGuirk of the Stonewall Democratic Club in Baltimore who, in 1978, called Hughes a lost ball in tall grass.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
James T. Brady, appointed Maryland's secretary of the Department of Business and Economic Development three years ago, resigned recently after a series of disagreements with Gov. Parris N. Glendening. Former managing partner with the Baltimore office of Arthur Andersen, Brady was widely respected as the voice of business in the governor's Cabinet.Staff writer Jay Hancock interviewed Brady last week about his differences with Glendening and his assessment of Maryland's business climate.Maryland's economy is doing well these days.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | December 24, 1995
HAVRE De GRACE -- ''Merry Christmas, little Maryland!'' exclaims the pink-cheeked elf with the state police bodyguards. ''Do I have some wonderful gifts for you!'' And indeed he does. Parris Glendening is outdoing himself this year as Father Christmas. Let us open his packages.The first contains a brand-new competitiveness costume, just crafted for Maryland by the governor's very own appointees. It's an entrancing little creation made mostly of smoke and mirrors, all tied together with slogans about lower taxes and less onerous regulations.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Sarah Brady, chairwoman of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, visited Annapolis Wednesday to meet with Gov. Martin O'Malley, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and legislative leaders and express her support for O'Malley's comprehensive gun legislation. Brady told reporters that among other things she planned to reassure Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, who has expressed misgivings about the part of the bill requiring licensing of handgun purchasers, that the provision does not conflict with the Second Amendment.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Marcia Myers contributed to this article | September 1, 1995
Lalit H. Gadhia, who is under investigation for possible violation of campaign finance laws, resigned two months ago from his job at the state's economic development agency, state officials said yesterday.Mr. Gadhia resigned June 30 as assistant secretary for the international division at the former Department of Economic and Employment Development. His resignation was not unexpected.He had taken an unpaid leave from the $80,000-a-year job in May after a report in The Sun questioned whether he had broken federal laws in raising money for a political action committee that promotes the interests of Indian-Americans.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Former White House Press Secretary James S. Brady was taken to a suburban Washington hospital yesterday morning after suffering cardiac arrest while receiving dental treatment.He was listed in critical condition last night, but a hospital official said doctors were "very hopeful" that he would recover.Mr. Brady gave his name to the nation's anti-gun crusade after he struggled to recover from devastating wounds inflicted during the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Marcia Myers contributed to this article | September 1, 1995
Lalit H. Gadhia, who is under investigation for possible violation of campaign finance laws, resigned two months ago from his job at the state's economic development agency, state officials said yesterday.Mr. Gadhia resigned June 30 as assistant secretary for the international division at the former Department of Economic and Employment Development. His resignation was not unexpected.He had taken an unpaid leave from the $80,000-a-year job in May after a report in The Sun questioned whether he had broken federal laws in raising money for a political action committee that promotes the interests of Indian-Americans.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.