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SPORTS
July 21, 2007
"I can talk about myself all day. That's easy." James Blake Tennis player and author of Breaking Back, on writer's block
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SPORTS
July 21, 2007
"I can talk about myself all day. That's easy." James Blake Tennis player and author of Breaking Back, on writer's block
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SPORTS
July 31, 2006
Andre Agassi, James Blake and Andy Roddick are among those scheduled to compete this week. Where / / William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center, Washington When / / Today through Sunday Format / / ATP U.S. Open Series event featuring 48 singles and 16 doubles teams. Purse / / $600,000 Admission / / Single session tickets range from $27 (today) to $45 (Sunday). Information / / Tournament hotline: 202-721-9500. Web site / / www.leggmasontennisclassic.com
SPORTS
July 31, 2006
Andre Agassi, James Blake and Andy Roddick are among those scheduled to compete this week. Where / / William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center, Washington When / / Today through Sunday Format / / ATP U.S. Open Series event featuring 48 singles and 16 doubles teams. Purse / / $600,000 Admission / / Single session tickets range from $27 (today) to $45 (Sunday). Information / / Tournament hotline: 202-721-9500. Web site / / www.leggmasontennisclassic.com
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
Andy Roddick, wearing a sweat suit and knit hat, looked relaxed. He was in town to play James Blake last night in the Mercantile Bank Tennis Challenge, and his surroundings were familiar. Two years ago, Roddick, then a teenager with great expectations, was here to play superstar Andre Agassi. Now, back at 1st Mariner Arena, Roddick, the No. 1 player in the world, found himself the headline act in a match against his friend, No. 37 James Blake. The two began by trying to outmuscle each other with warmup serves that had the crowd squealing.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - James Blake ate his customary omelet and cantaloupe before his match against Andre Agassi at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic. It wasn't exactly spinach or the ultraviolet rays of the sun, but Blake became Popeye and Superman all in one as he blasted 25 winners to upset the top-seeded and five-time Legg Mason champ Agassi, 6-3, 6-4, in a tournament semifinal at the William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center last night. In the other semifinal, No. 14 seed Paradorn Srichaphan of Thailand advanced to only the second ATP final of his career - his first in the United States - by knocking off No. 5 seed Marcelo Rios of Chile, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2. Blake, who will be making his third appearance in a Tour final this season, needed just 61 minutes to even his career record against Agassi at 1-1. "The strategy was not to err on the tentative side," said Blake, who could become the first African American to win this tournament since Arthur Ashe in 1973.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
Those dreamy dreads. That impish smile. Forget their pro tour rankings or tennis titles, their powerful serves or backhand strokes. Just who is hot, hotter, hottest on and off the court: James Blake or Andy Roddick? And where can you find posters of them shirtless? When the two telegenic players take the court tonight in the Mercantile Tennis Challenge at 1st Mariner Arena, count on untold fans to marvel at the magnitude of their hunkitude, not their scorching aces or volleys. "They are like rock stars," says Carly Van Hollen, who is a 14-year-old rising tennis player and freshman at St. Paul's School for Girls in Brooklandville.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Tennis fans had been so eager for this Legg Mason Tennis Classic. Andre Agassi was coming, and at age 35 with sciatic nerve problems in his back and hip forcing him to the sidelines at the French Open two months ago, who knows how many more opportunities there will be to see one of the game's legendary players? The question remains, and the opportunities shortened by one yesterday. Agassi withdrew before the start of this tournament by faxing a letter to tournament director Jeff Newman voicing his regrets.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2003
NEW YORK -- U.S. Open finalist Andy Roddick and the popular James Blake will be the featured match for Pam Shriver's annual benefit tennis event, the Mercantile Tennis Challenge. Shriver will make the official announcement today in Baltimore. The event is Dec. 4. "I went to Pam's event two years ago," Roddick said. "It was a good event. We raised a lot of money for kids. Unfortunately, I couldn't come back last year, but now, I'm going to get to play there again against James. "I think it's going to be a lot of fun for us and the fans who come to help a good cause.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - James Blake knew trouble lurked on Stadium Court at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic yesterday. Have his serve broken twice - or even just once - by No. 1 seed Andy Roddick and his chances of winning were slim, if any at all. So every time he let a game slip or left a chance for a break point on Roddick's serve on the court, Blake groaned. And each groan brought him closer to the inevitable, as Roddick completed his march through the tournament draw at the William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center with a 7-5, 6-3 victory.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | September 6, 2005
NEW YORK - James Blake listened intently to the news that he had just become the first African-American man since Rodney Harmon in 1982 to make the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open, and then confessed, a bit sheepishly, "Really? I didn't know that." He smiled. Not as broadly as he had after coming from behind yesterday to defeat Tommy Robredo, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3. But there was no mistaking the pride. Tomorrow, and undoubtedly in a made-for-television night match against his childhood idol, Andre Agassi, Blake can bring himself very close to transcending tennis and becoming something of a legendary American sports figure.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
As young men on blacktops throughout the city dribble and dunk with aspirations of becoming the next LeBron James or Carmelo Anthony, other city youths are spending their summer serving and slicing, in hopes of becoming the next James Blake or Serena Williams. On one side of the Druid Hill Park tennis courts, tournament team members play crisp, organized games. On the other, younger children bash balls over the fence at each other as 6-year-old Nikolas Davis runs toward a group of chatting girls, who scatter screaming at the sight of a boy about to intrude on their conversation.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - James Blake knew trouble lurked on Stadium Court at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic yesterday. Have his serve broken twice - or even just once - by No. 1 seed Andy Roddick and his chances of winning were slim, if any at all. So every time he let a game slip or left a chance for a break point on Roddick's serve on the court, Blake groaned. And each groan brought him closer to the inevitable, as Roddick completed his march through the tournament draw at the William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center with a 7-5, 6-3 victory.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Tennis fans had been so eager for this Legg Mason Tennis Classic. Andre Agassi was coming, and at age 35 with sciatic nerve problems in his back and hip forcing him to the sidelines at the French Open two months ago, who knows how many more opportunities there will be to see one of the game's legendary players? The question remains, and the opportunities shortened by one yesterday. Agassi withdrew before the start of this tournament by faxing a letter to tournament director Jeff Newman voicing his regrets.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
Andy Roddick, wearing a sweat suit and knit hat, looked relaxed. He was in town to play James Blake last night in the Mercantile Bank Tennis Challenge, and his surroundings were familiar. Two years ago, Roddick, then a teenager with great expectations, was here to play superstar Andre Agassi. Now, back at 1st Mariner Arena, Roddick, the No. 1 player in the world, found himself the headline act in a match against his friend, No. 37 James Blake. The two began by trying to outmuscle each other with warmup serves that had the crowd squealing.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
Those dreamy dreads. That impish smile. Forget their pro tour rankings or tennis titles, their powerful serves or backhand strokes. Just who is hot, hotter, hottest on and off the court: James Blake or Andy Roddick? And where can you find posters of them shirtless? When the two telegenic players take the court tonight in the Mercantile Tennis Challenge at 1st Mariner Arena, count on untold fans to marvel at the magnitude of their hunkitude, not their scorching aces or volleys. "They are like rock stars," says Carly Van Hollen, who is a 14-year-old rising tennis player and freshman at St. Paul's School for Girls in Brooklandville.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | September 6, 2005
NEW YORK - James Blake listened intently to the news that he had just become the first African-American man since Rodney Harmon in 1982 to make the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open, and then confessed, a bit sheepishly, "Really? I didn't know that." He smiled. Not as broadly as he had after coming from behind yesterday to defeat Tommy Robredo, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3. But there was no mistaking the pride. Tomorrow, and undoubtedly in a made-for-television night match against his childhood idol, Andre Agassi, Blake can bring himself very close to transcending tennis and becoming something of a legendary American sports figure.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2003
NEW YORK - James Blake shimmies with excitement. The crowd surrounding the Arthur Ashe Stadium court shimmies back. There is desire in the air. Desire by Blake to win this increasingly difficult match against Sargis Sargsian. Desire by the record crowd to see Blake, a personable young American from Yonkers, become a full-blooded star. It's a curious phenomenon. It's putting the age-old cart before the young horse. Blake won yesterday, 6-3, 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (6), but not before Sargsian made the point that Blake still has a ways to go. "I think this is another match since Wimbledon, where I've done a great job mentally," said Blake.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2003
NEW YORK -- U.S. Open finalist Andy Roddick and the popular James Blake will be the featured match for Pam Shriver's annual benefit tennis event, the Mercantile Tennis Challenge. Shriver will make the official announcement today in Baltimore. The event is Dec. 4. "I went to Pam's event two years ago," Roddick said. "It was a good event. We raised a lot of money for kids. Unfortunately, I couldn't come back last year, but now, I'm going to get to play there again against James. "I think it's going to be a lot of fun for us and the fans who come to help a good cause.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2003
NEW YORK - James Blake shimmies with excitement. The crowd surrounding the Arthur Ashe Stadium court shimmies back. There is desire in the air. Desire by Blake to win this increasingly difficult match against Sargis Sargsian. Desire by the record crowd to see Blake, a personable young American from Yonkers, become a full-blooded star. It's a curious phenomenon. It's putting the age-old cart before the young horse. Blake won yesterday, 6-3, 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (6), but not before Sargsian made the point that Blake still has a ways to go. "I think this is another match since Wimbledon, where I've done a great job mentally," said Blake.
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