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By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | April 29, 2001
"Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency -- From the Cold War Through the Dawn of a New Century," by James Bamford. Doubleday. 720 pages. $29.95. Like a mountaineer making a second assault on Everest, James Bamford has returned to the largest and most secret of U.S. intelligence agencies and brought back a book worthy of the scale, importance and mystery of its subject. "Body of Secrets" is a magnificent achievement and a compelling read for anyone interested in espionage, technology and the Cold War. It adds some astonishing footnotes to 20th century history and vividly portrays both the awesome power and growing troubles of the National Security Agency's army of eavesdroppers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
The Shadow Factory By James Bamford Doubleday / $27.95 / 345 pages The bad news in James Bamford's fascinating new study of the National Security Agency is that Big Brother really is watching. The worse news, according to this veteran journalist, is that Big Brother often listens in on the wrong people and sometimes fails to recognize critical information, like the fact that terrorists are gathering and plotting an attack. When it does find a critical nugget like that, it occasionally files it away somewhere and doesn't tell anybody.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
The Shadow Factory By James Bamford Doubleday / $27.95 / 345 pages The bad news in James Bamford's fascinating new study of the National Security Agency is that Big Brother really is watching. The worse news, according to this veteran journalist, is that Big Brother often listens in on the wrong people and sometimes fails to recognize critical information, like the fact that terrorists are gathering and plotting an attack. When it does find a critical nugget like that, it occasionally files it away somewhere and doesn't tell anybody.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | April 29, 2001
"Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency -- From the Cold War Through the Dawn of a New Century," by James Bamford. Doubleday. 720 pages. $29.95. Like a mountaineer making a second assault on Everest, James Bamford has returned to the largest and most secret of U.S. intelligence agencies and brought back a book worthy of the scale, importance and mystery of its subject. "Body of Secrets" is a magnificent achievement and a compelling read for anyone interested in espionage, technology and the Cold War. It adds some astonishing footnotes to 20th century history and vividly portrays both the awesome power and growing troubles of the National Security Agency's army of eavesdroppers.
NEWS
December 5, 1995
NSA's monthly news-letters - which still contain a warning that copies "should be destroyed as soon as they are read" - give a glimpse of the agency's unique culture. Some excerpts:October 1960:Learn more about the communist conspiracyThe following books are among the thirty-five recently placed on the Security Bookshelf: Pattern for World Revolution, Ypsilon; My Retreat from Russia, Petrov; I Chose Freedom, Kravchenko. ... One hundred volumes covering the Communist plan and its operation throughout the world now are available.
NEWS
By SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN and SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
Zug, Switzerland -- For four decades, the Swiss flag that flies in front of Crypto AG has lured customers from around the world to this company in the lake district south of Zurich.Countries shopping for equipment to encode their most sensitive diplomatic and military communications value Switzerland's reputation for business secrecy and political neutrality. Some 120 nations have bought their encryption machines here.But behind that flag, America's National Security Agency hid what may be the intelligence sting of the century.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2003
A major contractor to the National Security Agency says the agency suffered two power-supply breakdowns at U.S. intelligence posts since January 2000, an apparent sign that the global eavesdropping agency remains vulnerable to electronics failures even after a highly publicized computer crash three years ago fueled calls for reform. The outages struck two posts outside the agency's Fort Meade headquarters and appear to have been nowhere near as serious as the crash in January 2000 that disabled the NSA's computer network for three days.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | February 3, 2009
Two specials on the real world premiere tonight, and they both have Maryland ties. There's a cheap motel in Laurel, according to author James Bamford, where some of the Sept. 11 hijackers stayed. You can almost see it from the headquarters of the National Security Agency. And that's the point of "The Spy Factory," a Nova report tonight on PBS. The NSA knew about the men who would hijack the planes, but couldn't - or wouldn't - release the information to the FBI. Some of the charges and revelations have appeared before.
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | August 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The National Security Agency is running out of juice. The demand for electricity to operate its expanding intelligence systems has left the high-tech eavesdropping agency on the verge of exceeding its power supply, the lifeblood of its sprawling 350-acre Fort Meade headquarters, according to current and former intelligence officials. Agency officials anticipated the problem nearly a decade ago as they looked ahead at the technology needs of the agency, sources said, but it was never made a priority, and now the agency's ability to keep its operations going is threatened.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
WASHINGTON - President Bush is to visit the National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade this morning amid continuing controversy about secret government eavesdropping on Americans. The White House said Bush will meet with the NSA director, Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander, and the director of national intelligence, Mike McConnell, to discuss intelligence issues. Bush will also meet with employees of the NSA to thank them for their service, White House spokesman Gordon Johndroe said. The spy agency conducts global electronic eavesdropping of phones and e-mail by collecting and sifting signals carried by fiber-optic cable and satellite transmission.
NEWS
December 5, 1995
NSA's monthly news-letters - which still contain a warning that copies "should be destroyed as soon as they are read" - give a glimpse of the agency's unique culture. Some excerpts:October 1960:Learn more about the communist conspiracyThe following books are among the thirty-five recently placed on the Security Bookshelf: Pattern for World Revolution, Ypsilon; My Retreat from Russia, Petrov; I Chose Freedom, Kravchenko. ... One hundred volumes covering the Communist plan and its operation throughout the world now are available.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Ariel Sabar and Laura Sullivan and Ariel Sabar,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency intercepted two brief messages on Sept. 10 that warned that some kind of event would happen the next day, but the agency did not translate the messages until Sept. 12, a senior intelligence official said yesterday. The messages said in Arabic: "The match begins tomorrow," and "Tomorrow is zero" day. They were detected by the Fort Meade spy agency as its satellites and computers eavesdropped on phone calls and electronic messages worldwide. Intelligence officials cautioned, however, that the messages were so vague that even if the NSA had translated them before the attacks Sept.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Scott Shane | December 5, 1995
It is not a nest of spies. It is more like a city of them. x xxThe National Security Agency's campus off the Baltimore-Washington Parkway swells with enough spies every day to populate College Park or Salisbury.The 7 million square feet of office space at NSA's headquarters and the outlying locations could fill 10 U.S. Capitol buildings. The electricity consumed there could keep the lights glowing in a city of 50,000 people.pTC The agency's day-care center is the largest in the state, with room for 300 children.
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