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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
For us, the best jambalaya brings together tender chicken, spicy sausage, vegetables, rice and tomato sauce to make a hearty meal. We tried four jambalayas from area restaurants. Here are the results. BEST BITE >>>Clarence's Taste of New Orleans 2131 Old Edgewood Road, Edgewood -- 410-612-0700 Hours --11 a.m.-11 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-midnight Fridays; 4 p.m.-midnight Saturdays; 4 p.m.-11 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
There is a jambalaya entree at Ethel's Creole Kitchen that you have to have. By that, I mean pick up the phone and make a reservation. As prepared in Ed Bloom's Mount Washington kitchen, the jambalaya is the kind of dish that makes you realize that just about everyone else gets it wrong. Jambalaya isn't a quick-fix dish, where you dump a bunch of seafood and sausage over yellow rice. It's a slow-baked affair, made aromatic by the addition of a mirepoix - the Cajun's combination of chopped celery, onion and carrots - and made delicious by the confident application of first-rate seafood, tender chicken and pan-seared sausage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
There is a jambalaya entree at Ethel's Creole Kitchen that you have to have. By that, I mean pick up the phone and make a reservation. As prepared in Ed Bloom's Mount Washington kitchen, the jambalaya is the kind of dish that makes you realize that just about everyone else gets it wrong. Jambalaya isn't a quick-fix dish, where you dump a bunch of seafood and sausage over yellow rice. It's a slow-baked affair, made aromatic by the addition of a mirepoix - the Cajun's combination of chopped celery, onion and carrots - and made delicious by the confident application of first-rate seafood, tender chicken and pan-seared sausage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Valentine's Day is history, moving on to Mardi Gras. For some folks, Mardi Gras means a one-day celebration on Fat Tuesday itself; for others, that day is just the end of a revelry period that began on thethe Epiphany. And some folks call it Carnival. Paladar Latin Kitchen & Rum Bar in Annapolis, for instance, has been wading waist-deep since Jan. 30 in a celebration they're calling Carnaval. The restaurant has been featuring menu specialsĀ inspired by street food from South American, Central America and the Caribbean Ā  - chorizo and black bean fritters, Cuban chicken croquettes, Brazilians-style chile-spiked fudge and jibarito short rib sliders, which use flattened fried green plantains stand in for bread.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
About 5,000 visitors from throughout the Baltimore-Washington area are expected for tomorrow's Maryland Jambalaya Fest at Lake Elkhorn in Columbia's Owen Brown village, an event intended to celebrate the diversity of people of African descent."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
A bit of poetry, some rhythms and rhymes, features, fiction and finance.They're the elements of what four Columbia women call Jambalaya, a 32-page magazine featuring people of African descent in Howard County.The first issue of the free quarterly came out last week."We're trying to show you the diversity of the African community," said Pamela Woolford, 26, one of the magazine's publishers.Ms. Woolford and the three others are friends -- all in their mid-20s, all 1985 graduates of Wilde Lake High School.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | March 28, 2007
Chicken-and-Sausage Jambalaya is a party dish you can make ahead. Mardi Gras may have come and gone, but that's no reason to give up the joys of jambalaya. Perfect for a party any time of year, the traditional Cajun-creole rice casserole is studded with tomatoes, green pepper, celery, onions and bite-size pieces of meat, poultry or seafood. Although rice is the key ingredient, jambalaya's melodic name may derive from the Spanish word for ham, jamon, or the French word, jambon. But there are literally as many recipes for the dish as there are cooks, and modern versions aren't shy about substituting leaner meats, including chicken and turkey sausage.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A recipe for jambalaya, using chicken, sausage and shrimp, was the request of Susan Rohleder of Amherst, N.H.Kirk Kraft of Baltimore responded with a recipe that uses ckicken stock rather than chicken. "I hope this jambalaya recipe isn't too spicy for our reader in New Hampshire," he wrote. "The habanero pepper can be eliminated."JambalayaServes 62 cups uncooked rice4 cups canned chicken stock6 slices bacon, diced1 to 1 1/4 pounds shrimp1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning1 pound Spanish sausage (chorizo)
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | January 19, 2000
* Item: Glory Foods Southern Selections * What you get: 5 servings * Cost: From about $4.50 to about $9 * Preparation time: 17 to 35 minutes in microwave, 35 to 65 minutes in oven * Review: Glory Foods has added a range of entrees and side dishes to its established line of Southern specialties. If you're Southern or a Southerner at heart, you'll enjoy these meals just like Mama used to make. The Macaroni and Cheese microwaved well, was flavorful and kid-friendly, if a little on the heavy side.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | May 13, 1998
* Item: Zatarain's New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix* What you get: About 6 servings* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: About 35 minutes on stove top or 30 minutes in microwave* Review: If the '80s make their predicted comeback, we'll all be sipping blush wine, listening to zydeco music and downing this Cajun rice mix. Tastes to me like Zatarain's - a New Orleans company - is using an authentic, Big Easy recipe. There's plenty of heat, so only die-hards will reach for the Tabasco. (For those DTC who don't like it hot, the box also includes a recipe for toning down the cayenne.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
For us, the best jambalaya brings together tender chicken, spicy sausage, vegetables, rice and tomato sauce to make a hearty meal. We tried four jambalayas from area restaurants. Here are the results. BEST BITE >>>Clarence's Taste of New Orleans 2131 Old Edgewood Road, Edgewood -- 410-612-0700 Hours --11 a.m.-11 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-midnight Fridays; 4 p.m.-midnight Saturdays; 4 p.m.-11 p.m.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | March 28, 2007
Chicken-and-Sausage Jambalaya is a party dish you can make ahead. Mardi Gras may have come and gone, but that's no reason to give up the joys of jambalaya. Perfect for a party any time of year, the traditional Cajun-creole rice casserole is studded with tomatoes, green pepper, celery, onions and bite-size pieces of meat, poultry or seafood. Although rice is the key ingredient, jambalaya's melodic name may derive from the Spanish word for ham, jamon, or the French word, jambon. But there are literally as many recipes for the dish as there are cooks, and modern versions aren't shy about substituting leaner meats, including chicken and turkey sausage.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2005
It may not be grammatically correct to call a city the "most unique" in the country, but that didn't stop New Orleans from doing so - and not too many disputed it. From its food to its music, from the parties it threw to the literature it spawned, New Orleans culture was so distinct, and so influential, that Hurricane Katrina and the Pompeii-like flooding that followed - deadly as they were - couldn't erase it. The city's rich culture is safe, having...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2005
Even before we walked into Ethel & Ramone's on a clear winter night, we wanted to love the place. What could be bad about a cozy restaurant on a pretty little street in Mount Washington, helmed by a man who trained under the legendary Paul Prudhomme? Thoughts of fried oysters and jambalaya had our mouths watering. Once inside, expectations continued to rise. From our small table by the door, we could see the open kitchen, where chefs were ladling soups, searing seafood and bopping along to the cheerful zydeco music.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 16, 2000
* Item: Perdue Entrees * What you get: 2 servings * Cost: About $3 * Preparation time: 2 to 3 minutes in microwave, 25 to 30 minutes in conventional oven * Review: Perdue's newest heat-and-serve chicken entrees are heavy on tasty, white-meat chicken. The flavors could use a little fine-tuning, however. The Jambalaya With Chicken, Sausage, Rice and Ham was overpowered by fennel. The Chicken Alfredo With Fettucine was rich and creamy, but with an odd sweetness to it. The portions seem a little off, too. If I split this for 2 servings as the label suggests, I'd definitely have to come up with a salad and another side dish to make a meal.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | January 19, 2000
* Item: Glory Foods Southern Selections * What you get: 5 servings * Cost: From about $4.50 to about $9 * Preparation time: 17 to 35 minutes in microwave, 35 to 65 minutes in oven * Review: Glory Foods has added a range of entrees and side dishes to its established line of Southern specialties. If you're Southern or a Southerner at heart, you'll enjoy these meals just like Mama used to make. The Macaroni and Cheese microwaved well, was flavorful and kid-friendly, if a little on the heavy side.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 16, 2000
* Item: Perdue Entrees * What you get: 2 servings * Cost: About $3 * Preparation time: 2 to 3 minutes in microwave, 25 to 30 minutes in conventional oven * Review: Perdue's newest heat-and-serve chicken entrees are heavy on tasty, white-meat chicken. The flavors could use a little fine-tuning, however. The Jambalaya With Chicken, Sausage, Rice and Ham was overpowered by fennel. The Chicken Alfredo With Fettucine was rich and creamy, but with an odd sweetness to it. The portions seem a little off, too. If I split this for 2 servings as the label suggests, I'd definitely have to come up with a salad and another side dish to make a meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 1999
An open letter to Stephen and Michele Thalheimer, owners of the Water's Edge:When my friends and I picked up the temporary menu at your new Fells Point bar and restaurant, we saw your invitation to "let us know what you think." Thanks for asking.We ordered so much food, our waitress had to move our lighthouse candle-lamp to the next table. That made it a little dark in our corner of the brick-accented dining room, decorated simply in a maritime theme. (By the way, our smart, helpful waitress was a good hire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 1999
An open letter to Stephen and Michele Thalheimer, owners of the Water's Edge:When my friends and I picked up the temporary menu at your new Fells Point bar and restaurant, we saw your invitation to "let us know what you think." Thanks for asking.We ordered so much food, our waitress had to move our lighthouse candle-lamp to the next table. That made it a little dark in our corner of the brick-accented dining room, decorated simply in a maritime theme. (By the way, our smart, helpful waitress was a good hire.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A recipe for jambalaya, using chicken, sausage and shrimp, was the request of Susan Rohleder of Amherst, N.H.Kirk Kraft of Baltimore responded with a recipe that uses ckicken stock rather than chicken. "I hope this jambalaya recipe isn't too spicy for our reader in New Hampshire," he wrote. "The habanero pepper can be eliminated."JambalayaServes 62 cups uncooked rice4 cups canned chicken stock6 slices bacon, diced1 to 1 1/4 pounds shrimp1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning1 pound Spanish sausage (chorizo)
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