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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | October 26, 2012
State health officials in an article in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association criticized the oversight of compounding pharmacies and said the facilities need to take more responsibility in protecting patients from tainted drugs. The article, which appeared first in Friday's online edition of the medical journal, comes as the country still reels from a national meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids from the New England Compounding Center in Massachusetts.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | October 26, 2012
State health officials in an article in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association criticized the oversight of compounding pharmacies and said the facilities need to take more responsibility in protecting patients from tainted drugs. The article, which appeared first in Friday's online edition of the medical journal, comes as the country still reels from a national meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids from the New England Compounding Center in Massachusetts.
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NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2003
In a highly unusual action, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association is publishing today incomplete results from a prematurely aborted drug trial, along with a scathing editorial blasting the drug's manufacturer for halting the trial. The huge trial enrolled 16,602 patients in 15 countries in a five-year effort to determine if the anti-hypertension drug verapamil is better than cheaper diuretics and other drugs. But Pharmacia Corp., which manufactures verapamil under the trade name Covera, ended the study two years early, before researchers could determine whether the drug provided any possible benefit.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 16, 2008
The drug maker Merck & Co. drafted dozens of research studies for a best-selling drug and then lined up prestigious doctors to put their names on the reports before publication, according to an article in a leading medical journal. The article, based on documents unearthed in lawsuits over the pain drug Vioxx, provides a rare, detailed look at the industry practice of ghostwriting medical research studies that are then published in academic journals. The article cited one draft of a Vioxx research study that was still in want of a big-name researcher, identifying the lead writer only as "External author?"
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2004
Before you reach the articles on anti-coagulation therapy, or echinacea use among children with respiratory infections, or antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction, you will always see the art. It might be a Van Gogh or a Vermeer or a Cassatt. It might depict the Madonna or tulips or a boxing match. But each week, as you look at the cover of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), you might feel - just for a moment - like you're peeking through the window of a museum of fine art. "I consider that the heart of JAMA," Dr. Catherine D. DeAngelis, the editor, said of the artwork adorning its covers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
The American Medical Association is expected today to name Dr. Catherine D. DeAngelis, vice dean at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, as editor of its prestigious medical journal, according to sources knowledgeable about the appointment.DeAngelis, a pediatrician who is known as a staunch advocate for women in medicine, declined to comment last night on reports of her appointment to the top post at the Journal of the American Medical Association. The AMA is planning to make an announcement at an afternoon news conference in New York.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | June 16, 1992
Unhealthy press coverageSensational stories seem to be newspaper editors' favorites when it comes to reporting health news. This is confirmed in a study by Gideon Koren, of the Ontario Ministry of Health, and his colleague Naomi Klein. They looked at how newspapers covered two back-to-back stories published in the March 20, 1991, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). One of the reports showed that radiation exposure causes higher cancer rates; the other showed no radiation effect on cancer risk.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 21, 1999
BOSTON -- Well, well. Here it is, the first anniversary of life with Monica and someone finally got fired on account of sex.No, not House Judiciary Chairman Henry Hyde, the corpulent adulterer lecturing us about broken oaths. Not Rep. Bob Barr, the Georgia Republican and twice-divorced champion of the Defense of Marriage Act. Not even President Clinton. Not yet.The man handed his walking papers was George Lundberg, a doctor and editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Lundberg was canned after 17 years for printing a survey in this week's JAMA showing that 60 percent of college students think oral sex isn't sex.The AMA summarily ditched the editor who brought JAMA from the medical backwaters to the too-cutting edge for "inappropriately and inexcusably interjecting JAMA into a major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine."
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1991
This man who is a Serbian Yugoslav recites his litany of the awful hurts of World War II as if they happened yesterday.And as you listen, you realize that in the long history of animosity between Serbs and Croats, the 1940s were yesterday."
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | August 20, 1993
WORLD-CLASS MARTIAL ARTS:Some 400 masters and other competitors from a dozen countries will spin-kick and dragon-punch their way through the 1993 North American Chinese Martial Arts Federation Tournament tomorrow and Sunday at the Baltimore Convention Center.Teams from Russia, Poland, Mongolia, Estonia, Greece, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and India are booked.Demonstrations of kung fu, wushu (an explosive form that involves acrobatics), and tai chi (a slower, more relaxed form) are on the agenda.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
A new study suggests that low doses of aspirin may help prevent heart attacks in women at risk for cardiovascular disease, challenging the theory that aspirin helps men's hearts more than women's. "Women are clearly benefiting from taking aspirin and should continue to take it to improve their cardiovascular health," said Diane Becker, the study's lead author and a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The report appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2004
Before you reach the articles on anti-coagulation therapy, or echinacea use among children with respiratory infections, or antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction, you will always see the art. It might be a Van Gogh or a Vermeer or a Cassatt. It might depict the Madonna or tulips or a boxing match. But each week, as you look at the cover of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), you might feel - just for a moment - like you're peeking through the window of a museum of fine art. "I consider that the heart of JAMA," Dr. Catherine D. DeAngelis, the editor, said of the artwork adorning its covers.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2003
In a highly unusual action, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association is publishing today incomplete results from a prematurely aborted drug trial, along with a scathing editorial blasting the drug's manufacturer for halting the trial. The huge trial enrolled 16,602 patients in 15 countries in a five-year effort to determine if the anti-hypertension drug verapamil is better than cheaper diuretics and other drugs. But Pharmacia Corp., which manufactures verapamil under the trade name Covera, ended the study two years early, before researchers could determine whether the drug provided any possible benefit.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
The American Medical Association is expected today to name Dr. Catherine D. DeAngelis, vice dean at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, as editor of its prestigious medical journal, according to sources knowledgeable about the appointment.DeAngelis, a pediatrician who is known as a staunch advocate for women in medicine, declined to comment last night on reports of her appointment to the top post at the Journal of the American Medical Association. The AMA is planning to make an announcement at an afternoon news conference in New York.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 21, 1999
BOSTON -- Well, well. Here it is, the first anniversary of life with Monica and someone finally got fired on account of sex.No, not House Judiciary Chairman Henry Hyde, the corpulent adulterer lecturing us about broken oaths. Not Rep. Bob Barr, the Georgia Republican and twice-divorced champion of the Defense of Marriage Act. Not even President Clinton. Not yet.The man handed his walking papers was George Lundberg, a doctor and editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Lundberg was canned after 17 years for printing a survey in this week's JAMA showing that 60 percent of college students think oral sex isn't sex.The AMA summarily ditched the editor who brought JAMA from the medical backwaters to the too-cutting edge for "inappropriately and inexcusably interjecting JAMA into a major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine."
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | August 20, 1993
WORLD-CLASS MARTIAL ARTS:Some 400 masters and other competitors from a dozen countries will spin-kick and dragon-punch their way through the 1993 North American Chinese Martial Arts Federation Tournament tomorrow and Sunday at the Baltimore Convention Center.Teams from Russia, Poland, Mongolia, Estonia, Greece, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and India are booked.Demonstrations of kung fu, wushu (an explosive form that involves acrobatics), and tai chi (a slower, more relaxed form) are on the agenda.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 16, 2008
The drug maker Merck & Co. drafted dozens of research studies for a best-selling drug and then lined up prestigious doctors to put their names on the reports before publication, according to an article in a leading medical journal. The article, based on documents unearthed in lawsuits over the pain drug Vioxx, provides a rare, detailed look at the industry practice of ghostwriting medical research studies that are then published in academic journals. The article cited one draft of a Vioxx research study that was still in want of a big-name researcher, identifying the lead writer only as "External author?"
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
A new study suggests that low doses of aspirin may help prevent heart attacks in women at risk for cardiovascular disease, challenging the theory that aspirin helps men's hearts more than women's. "Women are clearly benefiting from taking aspirin and should continue to take it to improve their cardiovascular health," said Diane Becker, the study's lead author and a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The report appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | June 16, 1992
Unhealthy press coverageSensational stories seem to be newspaper editors' favorites when it comes to reporting health news. This is confirmed in a study by Gideon Koren, of the Ontario Ministry of Health, and his colleague Naomi Klein. They looked at how newspapers covered two back-to-back stories published in the March 20, 1991, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). One of the reports showed that radiation exposure causes higher cancer rates; the other showed no radiation effect on cancer risk.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1991
This man who is a Serbian Yugoslav recites his litany of the awful hurts of World War II as if they happened yesterday.And as you listen, you realize that in the long history of animosity between Serbs and Croats, the 1940s were yesterday."
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