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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | January 13, 2008
There was little reason to pay a visit to Barack Obama's primary school in a shady Jakarta neighborhood. But a stop at the Basuki School, built in the Menteng district by the Dutch in 1932, had been scheduled during a journalism fellowship last May sponsored by the East-West Center. The visit was optional, but no one declined the opportunity. As long as we were in the area, we reporters ostensibly wanted to check allegations that Obama had attended a madrassa. In reality, we were curious about a chapter his life and origins.
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NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 19, 2009
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told Indonesians yesterday that she wants to open a "robust partnership" with their fast-growing country, President Barack Obama's boyhood home. Arriving here on the second stop of her first trip as the top American diplomat, Clinton also announced that the Obama administration intends to sign a treaty moving the U.S. closer to a key regional group, the Association of South East Asian Nations. The Bush administration declined to sign the treaty, a move that critics took as a sign of its lack of interest in the region and preoccupation with the Middle East.
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BUSINESS
By ASSOCATED PRESS | April 9, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- For the third time in six months, Indonesia reached a new bailout deal with the International Monetary Fund yesterday, this time pledging to meet "to the letter" all commitments to reform its crisis-ridden economy.Disappointed by Indonesia's promises twice before, the IMF plans to monitor progress closely in the world's fourth most populous nation.Yesterday's compromise package came after three weeks of heavy bargaining. Indonesia showed new willingness to disband monopolies, while international lenders will allow Indonesia to cling to some subsidies to head off potential social unrest over rising prices.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | January 13, 2008
There was little reason to pay a visit to Barack Obama's primary school in a shady Jakarta neighborhood. But a stop at the Basuki School, built in the Menteng district by the Dutch in 1932, had been scheduled during a journalism fellowship last May sponsored by the East-West Center. The visit was optional, but no one declined the opportunity. As long as we were in the area, we reporters ostensibly wanted to check allegations that Obama had attended a madrassa. In reality, we were curious about a chapter his life and origins.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 19, 2009
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told Indonesians yesterday that she wants to open a "robust partnership" with their fast-growing country, President Barack Obama's boyhood home. Arriving here on the second stop of her first trip as the top American diplomat, Clinton also announced that the Obama administration intends to sign a treaty moving the U.S. closer to a key regional group, the Association of South East Asian Nations. The Bush administration declined to sign the treaty, a move that critics took as a sign of its lack of interest in the region and preoccupation with the Middle East.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 11, 2003
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- The Jemaah Islamiyah extremist network, accused of bombing nightclubs in Bali and the Marriott hotel in Jakarta, is suspected of planning attacks on U.S. oil companies and other targets in the Indonesian capital. A confidential document reviewed by The Los Angeles Times indicated that among the targets on the group's list are the Jakarta headquarters of Halliburton, a company once headed by Vice President Dick Cheney; Exxon-Mobil; and Unocal. Indonesian police officials warned seven U.S. companies last month that their names were on a list of potential targets uncovered during a raid on the house of suspected Jemaah Islamiyah members in the central Java city of Semarang.
NEWS
By Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 10, 2004
JAKARTA, Indonesia - As the death toll in yesterday's bombing of the Australian Embassy climbed to nine, police intensified their hunt for the man they believe is the master bomb-builder behind the attack: a Malaysian mathematician named Dr. Azahari bin Husin. Police said the car bomb, which injured more than 170 people, was the work of the Jemaah Islamiyah terrorist network and its explosives expert, Azahari, who allegedly constructed bombs used in the group's earlier attacks in Bali and Jakarta.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Stepping up the pressure on Indonesia, President Clinton and other world leaders yesterday called on Jakarta to reverse itself and immediately invite United Nations peacekeeping forces to stop the mayhem engulfing East Timor.President Clinton described the situation as "deteriorating" and said it had become clear that the Indonesian army was helping the militias that have been murdering pro-independence East Timorese and U.N. workers.U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan also called on Jakarta to ask for the peacekeepers.
NEWS
By Ian Timberlake and Ian Timberlake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 1999
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- For Akwet Lim, 54, a sign painter in Glodok, Jakarta's Chinatown, Chinese New Year means a visit to the temple, with its smoky, sweet incense and burning red candles. This year, his prayer was simple."I want peace," he says. "I am afraid."Last May, he had to flee from his shop and hide in an army barracks with his wife and three children during three days of mob violence that left an estimated 1,200 people dead, dozens of Chinese women raped and thousands of buildings damaged.
NEWS
October 4, 2005
Indonesia is an affront to the forces of extreme Islam. Its archipelago is home to more Muslims than any other nation. It is a flourishing democracy, with its first directly elected president having taken office just last year. And its government has taken a stand against violent Islamic fundamentalists, hunting down leaders of the regional version of al-Qaida, Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), and disrupting much of that terrorist organization. In 2002, when 202 people, including many foreign vacationers, were killed by terrorist bombs on Indonesia's island of Bali, the attack was widely viewed in part as retribution for Australia's backing of the U.S. invasion of Iraq.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2006
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Abu Bakar Bashir, the militant cleric alleged to be one of Southeast Asia's top terrorist leaders, was freed from prison yesterday after serving 25 months for his role in the bombings of two Bali nightclubs in 2002. Bashir, 67, smiled and waved to more than 100 supporters who had gathered outside Jakarta's Cipinang Prison to witness his release. "God is great," the crowd shouted as he stepped out of the prison gates. Bashir, who has denied any role in terrorist activities, signaled that he would use his freedom to promote the adoption of strict Islamic law in Indonesia, which has the world's largest Muslim population but is among the most moderate Muslim nations.
NEWS
October 4, 2005
Indonesia is an affront to the forces of extreme Islam. Its archipelago is home to more Muslims than any other nation. It is a flourishing democracy, with its first directly elected president having taken office just last year. And its government has taken a stand against violent Islamic fundamentalists, hunting down leaders of the regional version of al-Qaida, Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), and disrupting much of that terrorist organization. In 2002, when 202 people, including many foreign vacationers, were killed by terrorist bombs on Indonesia's island of Bali, the attack was widely viewed in part as retribution for Australia's backing of the U.S. invasion of Iraq.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia - An airline pilot will be tried in the killing of a prominent Indonesian human rights activist who died of arsenic poisoning while on a flight to Amsterdam, a five-judge panel ruled yesterday. Pollycarpus Budihari Priyanto, an off-duty pilot with Garuda Indonesia, is accused of putting poison into Munir Said Thalib's orange juice while the 38-year-old activist was flying from Jakarta to Singapore a year ago on the first leg of a journey to the Netherlands. Munir was a vocal critic of the Indonesian military and its record of human rights abuses.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
DEPUTY DEFENSE Secretary Paul Wolfowitz paid a call on Jakarta over the weekend, and in his wake, U.S. and Indonesian defense officials talked of rising prospects for renewal of military cooperation, limited for more than a decade because of murders and other abuses by Indonesian forces in now independent East Timor. Not so fast. It's hard to disagree with the argument that access to U.S. training would serve as a civilizing influence on the Indonesian army. But that sizable carrot - along with other military aid or sales - ought to be held out only once it's clear that Jakarta will sufficiently rein in its military in the tsunami-battered province of Aceh to allow badly needed foreign relief efforts to proceed effectively.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2004
LHOKSEUMAWE, Indonesia -- Mulyana, a 24-year-old housewife, had just sat down to a wedding party Sunday morning when the tsunami struck. She ran and held onto a coconut tree. Still, the water dragged her far out to sea. "I was alone in the middle of the ocean," Mulyana said yesterday from her hospital bed in this town on the northeastern coast of Aceh province, the area of Indonesia hit hardest by the disaster. "I was afraid of being pulled all the way to India." Mulyana, who cannot swim, said she clung to a coconut tree floating nearby.
NEWS
By Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 10, 2004
JAKARTA, Indonesia - As the death toll in yesterday's bombing of the Australian Embassy climbed to nine, police intensified their hunt for the man they believe is the master bomb-builder behind the attack: a Malaysian mathematician named Dr. Azahari bin Husin. Police said the car bomb, which injured more than 170 people, was the work of the Jemaah Islamiyah terrorist network and its explosives expert, Azahari, who allegedly constructed bombs used in the group's earlier attacks in Bali and Jakarta.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 7, 1992
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- The Non-Aligned Movement managed yesterday to pull off what had once been thought unlikely. It survived.An organization of 108 nations that together account for more than half of the world's population, the movement seemed bound for extinction when the Cold War ended, making non-alignment largely a non-issue.The weeklong summit meeting -- the first since the collapse of the Soviet Union -- drew scores of heads of state and government to the Indonesian capital of Jakarta.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
DEPUTY DEFENSE Secretary Paul Wolfowitz paid a call on Jakarta over the weekend, and in his wake, U.S. and Indonesian defense officials talked of rising prospects for renewal of military cooperation, limited for more than a decade because of murders and other abuses by Indonesian forces in now independent East Timor. Not so fast. It's hard to disagree with the argument that access to U.S. training would serve as a civilizing influence on the Indonesian army. But that sizable carrot - along with other military aid or sales - ought to be held out only once it's clear that Jakarta will sufficiently rein in its military in the tsunami-battered province of Aceh to allow badly needed foreign relief efforts to proceed effectively.
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
One month and 24 days after he suffered a stroke in Indonesia, Dennis Storm, 57, a decorated Marine veteran and Bel Air resident, returned to the United States on Thursday. Storm was working as a contractor for a Singapore-based company and living in Jakarta when he was admitted to the Siloam Gleneagles Lippo Cikarang hospital for a stroke on Sept. 2. While receiving care, he contracted a fungal infection, pneumonia and bed sores. His family had been working with the U.S. Embassy and other government, military and private organizations to bring him home since September.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2003
JAKARTA, Indonesia - The province of Aceh, where the United Nations estimates that 100,000 people have been displaced as a result of fighting, is without foreign aid workers because Indonesia has refused to give them permits, officials with the United Nations and other organizations say. A World Health Organization worker, who left Aceh on Friday because his permit was about to expire, was the last international aid worker in the province, U.N. officials...
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