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NEWS
July 27, 1994
The death of a young woman confined to the Harford County Detention Center this week recalls public attention to a penal facility that is already enwrapped in political controversy.There is no immediate suggestion that proper procedures were not carefully followed by jail personnel. Niecey D. Aldridge, 24, of Aberdeen died early Sunday after a series of severe asthma attacks since her incarceration three weeks ago, even as her lawyer asked for her medical release.An ongoing investigation ought to sort out the details in the sudden death.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1995
Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend had some advice yesterday for inmate David Warner at the Baltimore City Detention Center."You're not going to come back here, right?" she asked, sounding like a friendly assistant principal dealing with an unruly youngster."It's my first time, and it will be my last time," answered Mr. Warner, 27, before turning back to the soap opera sex scene unfolding on the television in one of the jail's day rooms.Mrs. Townsend, 44, was officially at the detention center to publicize the state's progress in bringing the jail's inmate population within a federally imposed cap.But the visit also provided a glimpse at her upbeat style as she made valiant, if sometimes awkward stabs at small talk.
NEWS
March 19, 1992
Today, the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee begins mulling over the proposal to allocate $1.25 million in design funds for a badly needed jail in Anne Arundel County. The prognosis is not good, however.The Anne Arundel County Council voted 5-2 against the site Monday night. The county's Senate delegation is evenly split on the issue. This is partly because County Executive Robert R. Neall didn't brief residents and local politicos on his jail plans.We hope that this legislative hearing shifts the focus of debate back to where it should be -- on the need for a new lockup.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer Contributing writer Vikki Valentine assisted with this article | August 10, 1995
All the trappings of the modern jail were on show at the Howard County Detention Center yesterday -- the $2 million electronic control center; the 28-bed substance abuse facility; the clean, modern cells and lack of crowding.But state inspectors touring the Jessup facility as part of a routine audit were a day too late to witness a darker side of jail life: a struggle with an inmate that sent a 37-year-old correctional officer to the hospital, where he was later treated and released.That incident went unmentioned as jail officials touted the benefits of the facility's $12 million renovations completed last fall, including a modernized security system and expanded recreational facilities.
NEWS
By Michael Bochenek | November 1, 2000
NEW YORK -- LaMont Flanagan, Maryland's commissioner of the Division of Pretrial Detention and Services, responded when asked recently about a federal investigation of conditions at the Baltimore City Detention Center, "We're not the Hyatt of jails, but we are the Motel 6." I've stayed at plenty of Motel 6s during the three years that I've conducted prison investigations for Human Rights Watch. And I've been to a lot of jails. As far as jails go, the Baltimore City Detention Center ranks among the worst I've seen.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1994
The duel moves north tonight.In what some have only half-jokingly called the second "battle between the north and the south," the County Council will hold a second public hearing on two resolutions: one would put a new jail in Glen Burnie; the other would put it in Crownsville.The resolution is important because a site must be agreed upon before the General Assembly will provide the customary 50 percent funding for jail projects. With the state legislative session more than half over, time is running out if funding is to be granted this year.
NEWS
January 2, 2004
BALTIMORE'S JAIL should carry a warning: "Hazardous to your health." That's the contention of lawyers for inmates at the Baltimore City Detention Center in East Baltimore who recently sought help from the federal court to address issues of medical neglect and unsanitary conditions there. These problems aren't new; in fact, they are long-standing. A year ago, the U.S. Department of Justice issued a scathing report that concluded the state's operation of the facility was so poor in several areas that it had violated inmates' constitutional rights.
NEWS
February 2, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Council once more is turning its attention to a site for a new county jail -- a prospect as frightening as it is necessary.Overcrowding and deplorable conditions make the existing detention center on Jennifer Road in Parole a time bomb. State lawmakers won't approve money for a new jail until council members settle on a location, so in that sense we are glad to see them tackling this issue. The problem is, they have tackled it umpteen times over the last three years, and each time have acted like politically craven wimps.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | April 19, 1995
WHATEVER the problem, the solution is now obvious: jail.You have heard the following statistic: The United States now has more people locked up than the country that used to hold the world record but whose name eludes me, probably the late Soviet Union or the South Africa of apartheid days.What about China? It is never listed as a contender, possibly because China does not have jails. It has re-education centers.The Chinese do not want them called jails, and we humor the Chinese in this. It is good business, and as President Coolidge observed, "The business of America is business."
NEWS
March 22, 1994
For two years, Anne Arundel County has been torn apart over where to build a new detention center. It is time for the fighting to stop.Last week, the County Council fulfilled its obligation to choose a site, deciding on Ordnance Road in Glen Burnie. Predictably, the vote broke along geographic lines, 4-3, with North County lawmakers opposing, but a choice was made and should be stuck to. This unpopular but necessary project has bounced from community to community because elected leaders have not had the courage to put the good of the county above parochial interests.
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