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NEWS
August 16, 1991
No matter how he tries to sidestep it, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke cannot avoid responsibility for the incompetence now being uncovered at the Baltimore city jail. During his administration, problems at the jail mushroomed. Only after intense prodding did the city take steps to improve matters. Still, human lives have been altered. At least 93 individuals have been held for months without trial dates; one poor soul was imprisoned for 396 days without any formal charges against him.That is a disgrace.
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NEWS
November 10, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- A kidnapping suspect who disappeared two months ago while helping county police gather information about the slaying of a Pasadena nightclub owner is back in jail, authorities said yesterday.Police spotted Clarence D. Pittman walking along East Eager Street in Baltimore Nov. 2. He was being held on kidnapping, carjacking and armed robbery charges, was released to help police get information on the shooting death of JoAnne Valentine. He disappeared days later.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | January 21, 1991
In Monday's editions, The Sun incorrectly described the Maryland Correctional Training Commission's authority over jails that do not comply with its standards. In fact, if a jail fails to meet state training standards, the commission can seek a court order compelling the institution to comply with its requirements.The Sun regrets the errors.The Baltimore City Jail has failed to provide most of its 600 correctional officers with the minimum of job-related training required by state law, according to a state official whose office is investigating a lack of proper training among the city's jail guards.
NEWS
July 14, 1993
If Carroll County's commissioners decide at this juncture to return to the drawing board and design a new jail from scratch, they will be making a big mistake. Carroll's detention center needs the additional cells now, and the sooner they are built, the better off the county will be.The commissioners have in their hands construction drawings and a contractor's bid for an 80-bed addition to the 120-bed detention center. If the commissioners approve the bid, construction could begin immediately.
NEWS
February 14, 1994
As bad as it is that Anne Arundel County's elected leaders have been unable to decide on a site for a new detention center, at least they have agreed about the need -- until now.Now state senators Michael J. Wagner, D-Glen Burnie, and Philip C. Jimeno, D-Brooklyn Park, are using figures that show the antiquated jail on Jennifer Road outside Annapolis is less crowded than it was a year ago as an excuse for burying this politically explosive issue.Forget their figures. The fact that the jail population was down by some 70 inmates during the fall (traditionally a slow time for prisons)
NEWS
April 30, 1991
City police are justifiably alarmed over the revolving-door nature of pre-trial detention in Baltimore. As The Sun reported in its lead story on Sunday, defendants accused of multiple violent crimes, including murder, are routinely being released on bail within hours after their arrest.Judges who set bail virtually concede that they often dispense assembly-line justice. But they also argue persuasively that the sheer volume of cases leaves them little alternative. Moreover, in at least one of the cases involving a drug-related murder, city prosecutors, themselves overwhelmed by the explosion of city crime, were not even present to argue for holding an individual charged with murder and already awaiting trial on charges that he committed four previous crimes involving guns and drugs.
NEWS
June 23, 1994
The expansion of the Howard County jail in Jessup promises to achieve more than the usual jail augmentation. The renovations will meet the basic goals of increasing capacity and enhancing security. More impressive, however, are new programs that aim to make inmates better people at the end of their short stays -- typically 90 days -- than they were when they entered the jail.Capacity had to be added because the facility, built 11 years ago to hold 108 inmates, is routinely overcrowded. When the new beds are in place later this summer, there will be enough space for 361 prisoners.
NEWS
March 21, 1993
Two inmates in a medium-security building at the Baltimore City Detention Center attempted an escape by removing a ceiling tile in a shower room and crawling through the rafters.But Tony Brown, 27, and David Gollahan, 31, apparently didn't realize that there was no where to crawl to, said Barbara Cooper, a jail spokeswoman.Above 7:40 p.m. Friday, correctional officers saw the opening through which the inmates crawled, and shortly afterward, captured them.Ms. Cooper said Mr. Brown, who is serving a sentence for assault and driving while intoxicated, and Mr. Gollahan, seving a sentence for traffic convictions, were placed in segregation.
NEWS
June 23, 1994
If the Carroll County commissioners don't follow the recommendation of newly hired jail warden Mason W. Waters to junk their plan for a modular addition to the jail in Westminster, they will be making a big mistake. Mr. Waters has suggested that instead of constructing a modular addition, a staff training room at the facility should be converted into a 24-bed dormitory for work-release inmates.The commissioners have to recognize they have two problems that need to be addressed -- short-term and long-term overcrowding.
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