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NEWS
April 1, 2010
Baltimore County police continue to search for a prisoner who was mistakenly released from the county's detention center Monday. Kevin Taron Kent, 26, was released by staff at the detention center, according to a news release from the Police Department. He was arrested Friday for narcotics violations and had been denied bail, according to police. Kent's last known address is in the 3300 block of Orlando Ave. in Baltimore. Police describe him as a black male, 5 foot 9, 190 pounds, with short black hair and brown eyes.
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NEWS
By Portia Wood and Dave Pantzer | November 24, 2009
E ighteen days after his marijuana-possession arrest, one of our clients, a 25-year-old Baltimore man, remained in jail at taxpayer expense. The defendant, a veteran of the war in Iraq, never failed to appear in court and had only one previous conviction for using marijuana, which resulted in his current probation. But he was still incarcerated at the city's Central Booking and Intake Center, simply because he could not afford his $1,000 bail. Maintaining a pretrial jail population is costly.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Former Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold walked out of jail Friday morning after being locked up since March on a misconduct conviction. Leopold, 70, dashed through a gate into a black Chevrolet waiting in the Jennifer Road Detention Center employee parking lot before being driven off in the rain. Although he will no longer be spending his nights in a cell, Leopold will be under house arrest for a further 30 days. Reached later on at his blue, clapboard-sided home in a private community in Pasadena, Leopold peered through the top window of his front door, but did not come out. "I can't talk now," he said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson on Friday was released a month early from the Baltimore City Detention Center, officials said. Henson was released early because he received jail credits, which inmates can earn for good behavior and for sharing a cell, said Melvin Easley, a jail spokesman. On Tuesday, Henson's attorney, Edward Smith Jr. filed a motion asking jail officials to allow him to visit his elderly mother before she dies. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail on June 13 for his role in a 2010 Election Day robocall that prosecutors said was designed to suppress black votes.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 18, 2014
Running a jail is at once among the most unrewarding of endeavors and important functions in society. Regular readers of the police blotter published in this newspaper can attest that, while there are new names in the arrest columns, a disturbing number of people show up with disturbing frequency. If jails were airlines, they would be racking up some serious frequent flier miles. To those working at the Harford County Detention Center, it cannot be an uplifting experience to so frequently see the same un-rehabilitated faces cycling through until they do something bad enough to be sentenced to serious time in the state penitentiary, get themselves killed or maimed badly enough that their street days end or finally grow tired of their own anti-social behavior.
NEWS
December 21, 2013
The recommendation of a Maryland legislative commission to spend $533 million to replace part of the Baltimore City Detention Center should not be a priority in fixing the problems at the jail. A far more important goal would be to reduce overcrowding at the jail more quickly ( "Lawmakers call for replacement of Baltimore jail," Dec. 11). The incarceration rate in Baltimore City, according to a 2010 Sun report, was 6.3 per 1,000 residents, making it the second highest rate in the country after New Orleans.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Toe-ing the line Uncovering history means research, but for this particular column it also involves a big toe. Past copies of county newspapers, from which information for this column are taken, are stored on hundreds of rolls of microfilm neatly labeled and stacked at the Howard County Historical Society. But the microfilm machine used to bring this information to life is a study in obsolescence. A couple of years ago there were still a few researchers who would try to extract history from this monster, but it became more and more stubborn in its old age. The chair in front of it was the machine was the site of much wailing and gnashing of teeth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 28, 2011
Perhaps you saw the report on Drudge about "closet-gate,"  which broke this weekend , in which staffers for Vice President Joe Biden constrained a Florida journalist to closet during a fundraiser at a wealthy developer's house. But what you haven't heard about -- until now -- is the 4-minute phone call that preceded that deprivation of freedom. Through our well-placed sources at the White House, we present to you the entire transcript of that phone call between party host Alan Ginsburg and the vice president.
NEWS
June 28, 1991
With the end of the fiscal year, the Baltimore City Jail becomes a state-run facility known as the Baltimore City Pretrial Detention Center. At least initially, the transfer is largely a financial wash for the city: In exchange for $38 million less in police aid, the state takes over an institution with a budget of about the same amount. But in future years, the savings could be more substantial, especially considering the capital investments that are urgently needed to make the institution a safe and smooth operation.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 23, 2010
A former Annapolis mayoral candidate and alderman was ordered Monday to spend next weekend in jail for groping the crotch of a drunken Naval Academy midshipman whom he was sponsoring. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Paul F. Harris Jr. said he probably would not have jailed Samuel E. Shropshire, but Shropshire's words to a pre-sentence investigator changed that. Despite Shropshire's text-messaged apology to the midshipman shortly after the incident and subsequent admission in a telephone call, Shropshire told the investigator that his 21-year-old accuser was "lying through his teeth," the judge said.
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