Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJail Time
IN THE NEWS

Jail Time

SPORTS
August 23, 2010
7 months — 1 for each Cy Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Prejudging anyone is always dangerous. Trial by media is not exactly trial by jury. But necessary qualifiers aside, it sure looks like Roger Clemens is guilty, unless entitlement and delusional behavior are defenses. Major League Baseball had no reason to persecute one of its iconic pitchers, yet it named him as a steroid cheat in the Mitchell report, chronicling a pattern of use that dated back to his revitalization in Toronto in 1998.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
A man Baltimore police want to question as part of an investigation into how an 18-month-old girl contracted gonorrhea has twice in the past three years been convicted of felonies, including manslaughter, and has violated his probation three times. Yet court records show that each time he violated the terms of his release, judges declined to impose additional prison time. The revelations have sparked outrage from city police, who, along with the governor's office, have pressed judges to send convicted felons back to prison when they renege on the rules governing their early release.
NEWS
March 27, 2010
The passage of health care reform by the House of Representatives late Sunday night sparked a weeklong debate on the Sun editorial board's blog, baltimoresun .com/secondopinion. As a social worker who fights on behalf of the downtrodden and impoverished everyday, I can say without a shadow of a doubt, March 21st is a day that will forever live in infamy. The federal government now owns and enslaves more sick people instead of empowering them. As a guy that's advocated before everyone from taxi drivers to legislators on behalf of the folks I serve, I can cite over 10 years of examples as to why you wouldn't want government involved in your health care.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | March 25, 2010
A pharmacologist whose fiancee died last fall after injecting phony drugs pleaded guilty Thursday to a felony charge of growing marijuana, which will likely lead to his deportation along with the chance to donate a kidney to his ailing father in Canada. Under a plea deal, Clinton B. McCracken was given a suspended five-year sentence that will spare him further jail time but force him to return to his home country. His lawyer said McCracken hopes the removal happens "as soon as possible" because of his father's medical condition.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 20, 2010
Convicted child predators would face at least 15 years in prison without the possibility of parole under a new measure advanced Friday by the Maryland House of Delegates. The preliminary approval came as delegates gave their final OK to two other sex offender measures: eliminating good-time prison credits and requiring lifetime supervision for violent and repeat offenders. Lawmakers have been reviewing sex offender laws this year in part as a response to the December killing of 11-year-old Sarah Foxwell on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | February 14, 2010
Four days before the birth of the Salisbury girl he would be accused of kidnapping from her bedroom and killing, Thomas J. Leggs Jr. pleaded guilty to his first sex offense. Over the next 11 years, as Sarah Haley Foxwell grew into a bright, lively middle school student, Leggs was charged with five other crimes against girls and young women, including raping a teenager on a Delaware boardwalk and grabbing a 13-year-old the same day his newborn child was brought home from the hospital.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
Dan Rodricks has once again visited the topic of national public service for young Americans, and once again he proposes to sacrifice their freedom. The headline of his column reads, "Young Americans will serve -- if we ask" (Jan. 31). But in the text, Mr. Rodricks reveals his proposal for two years of national public service: "For every American once he or she reaches the age of 18, with deferment optional until the age of 21, when service becomes mandatory." Is Mr. Rodricks incapable of distinguishing "ask" from "mandatory"?
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
It was a day packed with official events for Mayor Sheila Dixon: approving millions of dollars in contracts at a Board of Estimates meeting, holding a news conference to urge parents to vaccinate their children against swine flu, pushing health care reform at a town hall meeting, surprising a Baltimore school with a visit, even playing bingo at a senior center that she had fought to keep open. Throughout the day, she assumed multiple roles, from chief executive to mayor-as-mother to champion of communities.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | October 5, 2009
They worked at a Walmart in Laurel, Bibi Karpaiya in customer service and Mary Hummel in the garden section, often walking across busy Route 198 together to reach the store. As they crossed on Feb. 12, a car struck them, killing Karpaiya. On Friday, the driver, Patricia Ann Rowland, 48, was convicted of reckless driving, a traffic violation, saying that the sun's glare was so strong that she did not see that the traffic light on Route 198 at Russett Green East had turned red. The Anne Arundel County jury found her not guilty of the criminal charge of automobile manslaughter, in a case that is reigniting calls for legislation to address what prosecutors say is a gap in the law. "If you are negligent and somebody dies, there should be possible jail time," said Anne Arundel County Deputy State's Attorney William Roessler, who prosecuted the case against Rowland.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | August 11, 2009
Even a gun bust made by Baltimore's top cop can't buy jail time. Two brothers detained by Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III on New Year's Eve after he chased down men firing shotgun blasts into the night accepted plea deals Monday that will not require them to serve jail time. The arrests were dramatic, an example of Bealefeld personally carrying out his oft-reiterated strategy of going after "bad guys with guns." The commissioner and a member of his executive protection team pursued the suspects through an alley and into a rowhouse, and Bealefeld held one of them at gunpoint as a crush of officers converged to back him up. But the disposition in court eight months later highlights the city's continued challenges in translating such arrests into meaningful convictions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.