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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Katherine C. Hoffman, an artist and former longtime director of Red Cross volunteers, died Nov. 25 of dementia at a Washington assisted-living facility. She was 90. Katherine McCormick Commiskey, the daughter of a career Army officer and a homemaker, was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved frequently in her early years because of her father's military assignments. She moved with her family to Baltimore in 1934 and graduated from the Bryn Mawr School in 1939. She attended Goucher College and graduated in 1943 from the Maryland Institute College of Art , where she had studied with noted portrait painter Jacques Maroger.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Katherine C. Hoffman, an artist and former longtime director of Red Cross volunteers, died Nov. 25 of dementia at a Washington assisted-living facility. She was 90. Katherine McCormick Commiskey, the daughter of a career Army officer and a homemaker, was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved frequently in her early years because of her father's military assignments. She moved with her family to Baltimore in 1934 and graduated from the Bryn Mawr School in 1939. She attended Goucher College and graduated in 1943 from the Maryland Institute College of Art , where she had studied with noted portrait painter Jacques Maroger.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | January 24, 1991
If many artists rushed to embrace the exciting new movements in 20th century art, others reacted by embracing the old master painters of the past. A leader among the artistic conservatives was Frenchman Jacques Maroger, whose strong Baltimore connection resulted in a host of local pupils who still carry on in his style.An exhibit at The Life of Maryland Gallery features work by Maroger and 22 other artists who either studied directly with him or who have studied with his pupils. The man they emulate was Parisian-born and worked for years at the Louvre, where he studied the painting techniques of the old master artists so well represented in that collection.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 12, 1998
Artist and art restorer Jacques Maroger (1884-1962) emigrated from France in 1939 and taught at the Maryland Institute, College of Art from 1940 to 1959. A student of andbeliever in the materials and techniques of the old masters, he passed on his knowledge of the subject to his students.Maroger became a mentor to a group of artists who later became known as the Baltimore Realists, and they have been followed by another generation who created in the same style. He was also a friend and instructor of Alice Garrett, who lived at the North Charles Street estate Evergreen (now Evergreen House, the Johns Hopkins University)
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 12, 1998
Artist and art restorer Jacques Maroger (1884-1962) emigrated from France in 1939 and taught at the Maryland Institute, College of Art from 1940 to 1959. A student of andbeliever in the materials and techniques of the old masters, he passed on his knowledge of the subject to his students.Maroger became a mentor to a group of artists who later became known as the Baltimore Realists, and they have been followed by another generation who created in the same style. He was also a friend and instructor of Alice Garrett, who lived at the North Charles Street estate Evergreen (now Evergreen House, the Johns Hopkins University)
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 28, 1991
Jacques Maroger (1884-1962) was a French painter and conservator at the Louvre who believed that the old masters achieved greater brilliance with their paints than modern artists, and sought a way of mixing paints that would replicate that brilliance.After considerable research, he discovered a method, involving boiling oil and varnish, and was praised by many including the artists Raoul Dufy and Augustus John and the critic Roger Fry.In 1939 he came to this country and subsequently to Baltimore where he taught at the Maryland Institute.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
Eleanor Whiteley Foster, 89, Roland Park artist Eleanor Whiteley Foster, an artist known for her delicate pastel portraits of children, died Saturday from complications of corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, a rare neurological disease, at her Roland Park home. She was 89. For 40 years until retiring in 1995, Mrs. Foster created portraits with pastels that she mixed in a second-floor bedroom-studio of her Edgevale Road home. "She mixed them herself, using pigments she stored in old artichoke jars in order to get the exact colors she wanted," said her daughter, Sally Louise Foster of Roland Park, a photographer and author of children's books.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
Eleanor Z. Winkenwerder, a retired social worker who helped research syphilis at Johns Hopkins Hospital during the 1930s and later became an artist, died in her sleep Wednesday at Roland Park Place. She was 99. Eleanor Zouck, the daughter of a Baltimore lumber executive, was born at home on Belmont Avenue in Glyndon. "She would often joke that her one claim to fame was that she was brought into this world by Dr. T. Rowe Price, father of the founder of T. Rowe Price," said her son, Peter Winkenwerder of Glyndon.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | December 1, 2007
Melvin O. Miller, an artist whose oil paintings depicted Baltimore scenes of streetcars, harbor tugs and wooden market sheds, died of a heart attack Monday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Woodlawn resident was 70. Mr. Miller belonged to a group known as the Realists of Baltimore, artists who rejected abstract expressionism of the 1950s and employed luminous paints based upon ancient formulas. He stored 300 pigments in apothecary jars in his studio. "He had a way of capturing the activity on the streets of Baltimore," said fellow artist and friend Nancy Conrad, with whom he shared a Fleet Street studio.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Marie Trinite Whittie, an artist who affectionately depicted Baltimore in her paintings of its rowhouses and street scenes, died Saturday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Mercy Medical Center. The Bolton Hill resident was a day short of her 87th birthday. Born Marie Elizabeth Trinite in Pikesville, she grew up on Madison Street and attended the Cathedral School before graduating from Eastern High School in 1938. She earned a fine arts degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Mrs. Whittie worked while smoking a cigarette, and - during baseball season - listening to broadcasts of Orioles games that she played loudly on two radios, neighbors said.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | January 24, 1991
If many artists rushed to embrace the exciting new movements in 20th century art, others reacted by embracing the old master painters of the past. A leader among the artistic conservatives was Frenchman Jacques Maroger, whose strong Baltimore connection resulted in a host of local pupils who still carry on in his style.An exhibit at The Life of Maryland Gallery features work by Maroger and 22 other artists who either studied directly with him or who have studied with his pupils. The man they emulate was Parisian-born and worked for years at the Louvre, where he studied the painting techniques of the old master artists so well represented in that collection.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 13, 2005
In the 1950s, Clement Greenberg, one of modernism's most persuasive champions, declared figurative art all but dead as an expression of contemporary life; Greenberg thought the best art of his time invariably was abstract. Yet even as abstraction became widely practiced among artists nationally, a contrarian group of Maryland painters and sculptors stubbornly resisted the trend. Many of them had trained at the Maryland Institute College of Art under Jacques Maroger (1884-1962), a French-born painter and art conservator whose research at the Louvre in the 1920s led him to rediscover the lost techniques of the 17th-century Old Masters.
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