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Jacob Marley

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By [LORI SEARS] | December 24, 2006
A holiday show with a twist, Jacob Marley's Christmas Carol tells the classic Dickens story from the perspective of Scrooge's partner, Marley. Playing Friday and Saturday in the Village Dinner Theatre of the Patriot Point Theatre at Gettysburg, the original tale -- part comedy, part drama -- was penned by playwright and actor Tom Mula. Showtimes are at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Patriot Point, 241 Steinwehr Ave., Gettysburg, Pa. Tickets are $29.50 for adults and $26.50 for seniors, students, members of the military (past and present)
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FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune Newspapers | November 6, 2009
Have you ever wanted to strangle a ghost? You might well feel the urge after seeing "A Christmas Carol," Robert Zemeckis' exasperating re-imagining of the Dickens classic as a 3-D action-thriller zooming through Victorian London and the fevered dreams of that most miserly of men, Ebenezer Scrooge. The "it's better to give than to receive" moral to this story is almost lost under snowdrifts of special effects. Then there is the blizzard of Jim Carrey's theatrics to weather. The actor voices eight characters, including Scrooge at all ages as well as the three ghosts who haunt him - you can just see him in the recording studio bouncing around manically during one of the Scrooge-ghost tete-a-tetes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 18, 1997
If you need a break from Christmas shopping -- or worse, if Christmas shopping has led you to forget what the holiday is really about -- there's still time to catch two local shows inspired by Charles Dickens' classic, "A Christmas Carol." But you'll have to hurry. Both the Spotlighters' musical, "Scrooge," and Fell's Point Corner Theatre's original play, "Whatever Happened to Jacob Marley?" close this weekend.The Leslie Bricusse musical, "Scrooge," has become a tradition at the Spotlighters.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | December 24, 2006
A holiday show with a twist, Jacob Marley's Christmas Carol tells the classic Dickens story from the perspective of Scrooge's partner, Marley. Playing Friday and Saturday in the Village Dinner Theatre of the Patriot Point Theatre at Gettysburg, the original tale -- part comedy, part drama -- was penned by playwright and actor Tom Mula. Showtimes are at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Patriot Point, 241 Steinwehr Ave., Gettysburg, Pa. Tickets are $29.50 for adults and $26.50 for seniors, students, members of the military (past and present)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 18, 1997
At the risk of sounding like Scrooge, a little "Christmas Carol" can go a long way at this time of year, so Fell's Point Corner Theatre deserves credit for bucking the trend and mounting an original Christmas play.Granted, as the title suggests, "Whatever Happened to Jacob Marley?" is a sequel to Dickens' classic tale. And not only is the staging more pageant-like than dramatic, but the context is extremely contrived -- spooning a generous dollop of Fells Point history over Dickens' traditional Christmas pudding.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | December 23, 1990
The arts have given the world many wonderful Christmas presents over the years. Handel's "Messiah," Gian-Carlo Menotti's "Amahl and the Night Visitors" and Tchaikovsky's ballet score to "The Nutcracker" are but three examples.And from the literary realm is Charles Dickens' popular tale of human redemption, "A Christmas Carol."The Annapolis Dinner Theatre's initial presentation of this seasonal classic was an energetic, attractive affair highlighted by Chuck Richards' menacing representation of Scrooge and actor David Reynolds, who stole the show not once, but twice as Jacob Marley and the Ghost of Christmas Present.
FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune Newspapers | November 6, 2009
Have you ever wanted to strangle a ghost? You might well feel the urge after seeing "A Christmas Carol," Robert Zemeckis' exasperating re-imagining of the Dickens classic as a 3-D action-thriller zooming through Victorian London and the fevered dreams of that most miserly of men, Ebenezer Scrooge. The "it's better to give than to receive" moral to this story is almost lost under snowdrifts of special effects. Then there is the blizzard of Jim Carrey's theatrics to weather. The actor voices eight characters, including Scrooge at all ages as well as the three ghosts who haunt him - you can just see him in the recording studio bouncing around manically during one of the Scrooge-ghost tete-a-tetes.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1995
On Thursday night, while the Baltimore school board was voting unanimously to kill the city's contract with Education Alternatives, Inc., one EAI representative was at another meeting -- telling parents at Murch School in Northwest Washington about EAI's school-management services.EAI's cancellation in Baltimore may make it more difficult for the Minneapolis-based firm to win contracts in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, even supporters of EAI say."What's happened in Baltimore is extremely disappointing.
NEWS
December 4, 1993
The photo caption accompanying the review of "A Community Carol" in yesterday's Maryland Live contained incomplete information and incorrectly identified one of the performers. The play is a co-production by Arena Stage and Cornerstone Theater Company. The actor pictured with Al Freeman Jr., who plays Scrooge, was Henry Strozier, in the role of the Ghost of Jacob Marley.The Sun regrets the errors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 10, 1998
As its annual holiday presentation, Fell's Point Corner Theatre is once again showcasing the students in its Children's Theatre Program, who will appear with experienced community theater actors in the Charles Dickens classic "A Christmas Carol."Mark Lewis directs the production, which stars Sandy Alexander as Scrooge and Gareth Kelly as Jacob Marley. Each performance will also feature a Christmas bazaar, offering items ranging from crafts to baked goods. Proceeds help provide scholarships for the children's program.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 18, 1997
At the risk of sounding like Scrooge, a little "Christmas Carol" can go a long way at this time of year, so Fell's Point Corner Theatre deserves credit for bucking the trend and mounting an original Christmas play.Granted, as the title suggests, "Whatever Happened to Jacob Marley?" is a sequel to Dickens' classic tale. And not only is the staging more pageant-like than dramatic, but the context is extremely contrived -- spooning a generous dollop of Fells Point history over Dickens' traditional Christmas pudding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 18, 1997
If you need a break from Christmas shopping -- or worse, if Christmas shopping has led you to forget what the holiday is really about -- there's still time to catch two local shows inspired by Charles Dickens' classic, "A Christmas Carol." But you'll have to hurry. Both the Spotlighters' musical, "Scrooge," and Fell's Point Corner Theatre's original play, "Whatever Happened to Jacob Marley?" close this weekend.The Leslie Bricusse musical, "Scrooge," has become a tradition at the Spotlighters.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1995
On Thursday night, while the Baltimore school board was voting unanimously to kill the city's contract with Education Alternatives, Inc., one EAI representative was at another meeting -- telling parents at Murch School in Northwest Washington about EAI's school-management services.EAI's cancellation in Baltimore may make it more difficult for the Minneapolis-based firm to win contracts in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, even supporters of EAI say."What's happened in Baltimore is extremely disappointing.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | December 23, 1990
The arts have given the world many wonderful Christmas presents over the years. Handel's "Messiah," Gian-Carlo Menotti's "Amahl and the Night Visitors" and Tchaikovsky's ballet score to "The Nutcracker" are but three examples.And from the literary realm is Charles Dickens' popular tale of human redemption, "A Christmas Carol."The Annapolis Dinner Theatre's initial presentation of this seasonal classic was an energetic, attractive affair highlighted by Chuck Richards' menacing representation of Scrooge and actor David Reynolds, who stole the show not once, but twice as Jacob Marley and the Ghost of Christmas Present.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 2, 1999
It's deck-the-halls time, and the Spotlighters Theatre is humming bah-humbug again. "Scrooge," the stage version of Leslie Bricusse's 1970 movie musical of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," returns to the St. Paul Street theater tomorrow.This year's production is directed by Ron Gregory, who also plays the title role. Among the other cast members are Mitch Nathan -- who doubles as set designer -- in the role of Bob Cratchit, Bill Rucker as Jacob Marley and Cori Proctor as Tiny Tim.Show times at the Spotlighters, 817 St. Paul St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays, through Dec. 19. Tickets are $10. Call 410-752-1225.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 7, 1994
The most ambitious offerings on TV tonight come from other than commercial network television. A&E has a documentary about the first lady, TBS has the first part of a three-part examination of women in recent history, Showtime has the start of a wonderful new children's series by Shelley Duvall -- and PBS has the best show of them all, an enthralling Ross McElwee film that opens the new season of "P.O.V."* "NYPD Blue" (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Kelly (David Caruso) faces an ethical dilemma in this repeat, and becomes a bit less noble in the aftermath.
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