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By LAKAILA WILLIAMS | January 4, 2007
jacksonpollock.org What's the point? -- Jackson Pollock was one of America's most notable artists and a forerunner in the abstract art movement of the 1940s. He's known largely for his "splatter" paintings, and this site lets you attempt his methods on the computer screen. What to look for --It's simple: Just glide your mouse across the screen, and "paint" splatters will fall. Click the mouse, and the color will change. Make your own Jackson Pollock-style original, and although you may not be able to sell it for a Pollock price, you'll still have a ball expressing yourself through art.
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NEWS
June 22, 2014
Although some customs have changed — and in spite of omnipresent ear buds and texting — the custom of greeting people still exists. I remember my grandfather lifting his hat as he passed, without speaking to, the female supervisors on our school playground. He lifted it when he passed a neighbor coming into his apartment building and removed it when we stepped inside the ancient elevator there. Except for baseball caps, few men today wear hats. It is refreshing to see them removed in a house or restaurant.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 1997
I understand it's possible to visit the former studio of Jackson Pollock in East Hampton, N.Y., but that visiting hours are erratic. Will the studio be open in June?Yes, the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center will be open then. The site is a National Historic Landmark, situated in the Springs section of East Hampton at 830 Fireplace Road. It may be toured by appointment from May through October on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. The site's research collection, which focuses mainly on the development of the abstract expressionist movement -- of which Jackson Pollock was a leading member -- is open year-round, also by appointment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LAKAILA WILLIAMS | January 4, 2007
jacksonpollock.org What's the point? -- Jackson Pollock was one of America's most notable artists and a forerunner in the abstract art movement of the 1940s. He's known largely for his "splatter" paintings, and this site lets you attempt his methods on the computer screen. What to look for --It's simple: Just glide your mouse across the screen, and "paint" splatters will fall. Click the mouse, and the color will change. Make your own Jackson Pollock-style original, and although you may not be able to sell it for a Pollock price, you'll still have a ball expressing yourself through art.
NEWS
September 15, 1997
Dr. Roger O. Egeberg,93, the government's top health official during the Nixon administration, personal physician to Gen. Douglas MacArthur during World War II and a former medical school dean, died of pneumonia Friday at his Washington home.He was heading the University of Southern California's medical school in 1969 when President Richard M. Nixon named him assistant secretary for health and scientific affairs in the old Department of Health, Education and Welfare.As a special consultant to the president on health affairs from 1971 to 1979, he was a strong supporter of health care reform.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 6, 1996
Between 1910 and 1950, America underwent profound and irreversible changes. We fought in two world wars and went through the worst depression in our history. We experienced an immense growth in industry. We saw the coming of the automobile, movies, radio and television. And we witnessed a huge migration from rural to urban America in response to industrialization, the Depression and World War II.Not surprisingly, art in this country underwent similar upheaval. In 1910, America was an outpost of the art world; its center was Paris, where Matisse and Picasso caught the eye of forward-looking collectors such as Gertrude Stein and Baltimore's Cone sisters.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 11, 1990
Washington.---EVIDENCE that Washington is, strictly speaking, deranged -- literally disconnected from reality -- includes Richard Darman's statement on Sunday television that President Bush did not do what the nation saw him do. Mr. Darman, the budget director, said the president, in his television speech concerning the budget deal, ''wasn't actually asking the public to support this.''This is what Mr. Bush said: ''Tell your congressman and senators you support this. . . . Urge them to stand with the president.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
Although some customs have changed — and in spite of omnipresent ear buds and texting — the custom of greeting people still exists. I remember my grandfather lifting his hat as he passed, without speaking to, the female supervisors on our school playground. He lifted it when he passed a neighbor coming into his apartment building and removed it when we stepped inside the ancient elevator there. Except for baseball caps, few men today wear hats. It is refreshing to see them removed in a house or restaurant.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | November 1, 2005
Growing up in Baltimore during the 1950s, Linda Rosen Kushner remembers being surrounded by paintings and other artworks in her family's homes, first on East Monument Street and later in the city's Ashburton neighborhood. As well she might, since her parents, Israel and Selma Rosen, didn't have just any old pictures on the wall. Though the couple were of modest means - he was a general practitioner with offices in East Baltimore, she a former schoolteacher-turned-homemaker - what they possessed in abundance was a passion for art. That, plus a terrific eye for talent and an adventurous spirit, led them to buy scores of works by some of the greatest artists of the 20th century - Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Rothko - at a time when practically no one else dared.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 16, 1996
"The Face of America" at the Baltimore Museum of Art is maddening and exhilarating, frustrating and rewarding, cluttered with works and bursting with ideas. Like America itself, this show is big, sprawling and hard to get a handle on, but getting to know it is worth the trouble.Subtitled "Modernist Art 1910-1950," it's an attempt to show the many aspects of the modern movement in this country through use of the museum's extensive collection. Five curators were involved in putting it together, and it looks it, containing about 240 works that include paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs, decorative arts and textiles.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | November 1, 2005
Growing up in Baltimore during the 1950s, Linda Rosen Kushner remembers being surrounded by paintings and other artworks in her family's homes, first on East Monument Street and later in the city's Ashburton neighborhood. As well she might, since her parents, Israel and Selma Rosen, didn't have just any old pictures on the wall. Though the couple were of modest means - he was a general practitioner with offices in East Baltimore, she a former schoolteacher-turned-homemaker - what they possessed in abundance was a passion for art. That, plus a terrific eye for talent and an adventurous spirit, led them to buy scores of works by some of the greatest artists of the 20th century - Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Rothko - at a time when practically no one else dared.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jason Edward Kaufman and Jason Edward Kaufman,Special to the Sun | July 7, 2002
WASHINGTON -- If you've ever hung a camera around your neck and gone in search of interesting motifs in nature, you've followed in the footsteps of Edward Weston (1886-1958). One of the great pioneering American art photographers of the second quarter of the 20th century, he created those sensuously sculptural close-ups of peppers, nautilus shells and nudes that have become paradigms of 20th-century photographic art. You may not have used a fancy view camera with large negatives, and probably didn't get such silky, sexy results, but you had the general idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 12, 2001
Clyfford Still was one of the pioneers of the postwar abstract expressionist movement that propelled American painting into the forefront of the international art world. Yet he is not nearly as well-known as others in his generation of ab-exers -- Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, for example -- whose careers blossomed during the late 1940s and 1950s. If Still's place among the founders of abstract expressionism is less prominent -- though no less secure -- than that of his peers, it is partly the artist's own fault.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | January 14, 2001
There is a small, cranky, iconoclastic voice in me that occasionally wonders whether painting any longer has much relevance to the future of art in America. I say this, of course, in the full knowledge that any report of the demise of painting is almost certainly premature. In an earlier incarnation at this newspaper, for example, I once took a kind of perverse delight in announcing the death of poetry, say, or the end of jazz. Well, poetry and jazz still soldier on -- though somewhat anemically, one might argue, given their illustrious pasts -- so far be it from me to consign the art of painting to a similar fate.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1999
Saints and postage stamp figures have this much in common: Both must be deceased.No chance, then, that American painter Jackson Pollock would have shown up at the U.S. Postal Service ceremony in Georgia on Thursday unveiling the 1940s installment of the "Celebrate the Century" stamp series, in which Pollock appears on a stamp commemorating Abstract Expressionism. It wouldn't have been his kind of party, anyway. No beer, no bourbon, no smoking.Pollock drank and smoked a lot. He smoked so much that you have to flip through many photographs of him before you find one in which he's not smoking.
FEATURES
By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | November 19, 1998
Half a century after he created them, Jackson Pollock's drip paintings have achieved maturity.They are free now of their "parents," the mythic Pollock persona that lent them an aura of frantic abandon and the total originality of image that caused extreme reactions. They now have their own identity, one that's less raw and anguished, more calm and beautiful than these pictures at first appeared.The drip paintings constitute the heart of the exhibit "Jackson Pollock" at New York's Museum of Modern Art. With more than 150 works, it's the largest Pollock exhibit so far and the first major American retrospective since 1967.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | January 14, 2001
There is a small, cranky, iconoclastic voice in me that occasionally wonders whether painting any longer has much relevance to the future of art in America. I say this, of course, in the full knowledge that any report of the demise of painting is almost certainly premature. In an earlier incarnation at this newspaper, for example, I once took a kind of perverse delight in announcing the death of poetry, say, or the end of jazz. Well, poetry and jazz still soldier on -- though somewhat anemically, one might argue, given their illustrious pasts -- so far be it from me to consign the art of painting to a similar fate.
NEWS
September 15, 1997
Dr. Roger O. Egeberg,93, the government's top health official during the Nixon administration, personal physician to Gen. Douglas MacArthur during World War II and a former medical school dean, died of pneumonia Friday at his Washington home.He was heading the University of Southern California's medical school in 1969 when President Richard M. Nixon named him assistant secretary for health and scientific affairs in the old Department of Health, Education and Welfare.As a special consultant to the president on health affairs from 1971 to 1979, he was a strong supporter of health care reform.
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