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NEWS
April 25, 2013
As someone who came of age after the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, I was really struck and disturbed by some of the scenes in the Jackie Robinson movie, "42" ("'42' hits a homer at the box office," April 15). When you see the crowds in these scenes with their bigotry, anger, intolerance and narrow-mindedness, I am struck and confused, wondering if I am watching an African-American hero trying to integrate professional baseball in 1963, or watching an African-American hero, (Dr. Ben Carson or any other conservative speaker)
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
HOUSTON - When he became the first black manager in the Major Leagues the 1975 as a player/manager with the Cleveland Indians, Orioles Hall of Famer Frank Robinson was shocked to see that the Indians still specified a player's race on their scouting reports. Yes, Robinson - who as a player won two World Series titles as a player with the Orioles and won the 1966 Triple Crown - broke down the barrier for future black managers, but was immediately struck with the realizations of how some things still needed changing.
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NEWS
April 27, 2013
Thanks for your wonderful article about Sam Lacy ("How Sam Lacy helped integrate baseball," April 22). My husband and I were privileged to know Mr. Lacy during the last decade of his life and to hear directly from him what it was like during the days when Jackie Robinson broke into the majors. Sam's omission from "42" is indeed a travesty, to quote his son Tim. An equally apt word would be injustice. We are grateful to you for enlightening The Sun's readers about the pivotal role this modest, quiet, determined and gentle man played in establishing Major League Baseball as we know it today, and in recognizing that Jackie Robinson did indeed have the guts to let his skill do the fighting for him. Jan Roth
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
The Orioles will be wearing the road grays of the Negro League Baltimore Elite Giants when they travel to Houston to play the Astros in MLB's eighth annual Civil Rights Game on May 30. The team tweeted out a picture of the jersey Wednesday morning , and like many baseball throwback jerseys, it's pretty tremendous. The road gray jersey is reminiscent of the Atlanta Braves away uniforms, with red trim and red script lettering and thin blue piping. The navy blue, red-brimmed hat features a white block B. Houston will wear the home whites of the Houston Eagles, a sharp white top with navy blue script and a navy hat. According to the Negro League Baseball Museum's website , the Elite Giants (pronounced E-light)
NEWS
May 25, 2009
On May 18, 2009, JACKIE ROBINSON HAZELTON. Family and friends may visit the family-owned and operated Howell Funeral Home, 3331 Brehms Lane, on Tuesday May 26th from 3 to 8 PM. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at New Life United Methodist Church, 4400 Parkside Drive. Wake 11 AM. Funeral services 11:30 AM. Interment King Memorial Park Cemetery.
SPORTS
By MLB.COM | April 15, 2007
Orioles tributes Here's how the Orioles are celebrating today's 60th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking baseball's color barrier: Fans at this afternoon's game against the Kansas City Royals will receive a program commemorating Robinson's accomplishments. Pre-game ceremonies will include a video tribute to Robinson and recognition of a local Jackie Robinson Foundation scholar Aurelia Michael, a senior business major at the University of Maryland. The Orioles will host 40 youths from the Baltimore Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI)
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS and RAY JENKINS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 1997
"Jackie Robinson," by Arnold Rampersad. Knopf. 512 pages. $27.50.In this 50th anniversary of the season that he broke the color barrier in major-league baseball, Jackie Robinson hovers in the national psyche as an immense icon. Two icons, actually - first, as the winsome young Apollo-in-ebony striding, to jeers and cheers, onto Ebbets Field in 1947; later, as the elegant white-haired executive of Chock Full o' Nuts.In this stately biography, Arnold Rampersad, a Princeton professor and path-breaking biographer of such notable black Americans as Richard Wright, Langston Hughes and Arthur Ashe, shows Jack Robinson to be a far more complex man than a mere "role model" - a somewhat demeaning term, when you think about it, like the "credit-to-his-race" which the great athlete was routinely called at the outset of his blazing career.
NEWS
By Andrea Lewis | October 7, 2003
ALTHEA GIBSON has been one of my heroes for as long as I can remember. Tennis was the first sport that I loved when I was growing up, and though Ms. Gibson's tennis career was over well before I knew what "30-love" meant, I can still remember heading off to our Detroit neighborhood playground with the wood racket and can of tennis balls my mother bought me. I spent hours whacking balls against a wall and imagining myself winning Wimbledon just as Althea...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1995
Jackie Robinson did more for African-Americans than open a door.Although the simple act of stepping onto a ball field the afternoon of April 15, 1947, immortalized him as the first black man to play modern major-league baseball, his commitment to the fight for civil rights -- and the efforts he made until his death in 1972 -- made him more than just a symbol, according to a new book, "Great Time Coming: The Life of Jackie Robinson from Baseball to Birmingham."He...
NEWS
By Fred B. Shoken | April 28, 1996
THIS WEEKEND marks the 50th anniversary of a milestone in baseball and civil rights history in Baltimore.In near-40-degree temperature, 3,415 fans experienced integrated baseball a full season before Jackie Robinson became the first African-American in the majors.On the evening of April 27, 1946, blacks and whites played professional baseball together for the first time in a regular season game here. Two African-Americans, Robinson and John Wright, played for the Montreal Royals against the Baltimore Orioles in an International League contest at the old Municipal Stadium.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Arundel High School sophomore Chloe Hill entered a screening of the motion picture "42" on Thursday indebted to the film's main character, baseball player Jackie Robinson. The film depicts Robinson's struggles and triumphs in becoming the first African-American to play in the major leagues, breaking the national pastime's color barrier on April 15, 1947. "Thanks to him, I'm able to play," said Hill, who is black and plays for Arundel High's junior varsity softball team. Hill was among 300 junior varsity baseball and softball players from all 12 Anne Arundel County public high schools to attend a screening hosted by OriolesREACH and Major League Baseball at Hoyt's West Nursery Cinemas in Linthicum.
NEWS
April 27, 2013
Thanks for your wonderful article about Sam Lacy ("How Sam Lacy helped integrate baseball," April 22). My husband and I were privileged to know Mr. Lacy during the last decade of his life and to hear directly from him what it was like during the days when Jackie Robinson broke into the majors. Sam's omission from "42" is indeed a travesty, to quote his son Tim. An equally apt word would be injustice. We are grateful to you for enlightening The Sun's readers about the pivotal role this modest, quiet, determined and gentle man played in establishing Major League Baseball as we know it today, and in recognizing that Jackie Robinson did indeed have the guts to let his skill do the fighting for him. Jan Roth
NEWS
April 25, 2013
As someone who came of age after the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, I was really struck and disturbed by some of the scenes in the Jackie Robinson movie, "42" ("'42' hits a homer at the box office," April 15). When you see the crowds in these scenes with their bigotry, anger, intolerance and narrow-mindedness, I am struck and confused, wondering if I am watching an African-American hero trying to integrate professional baseball in 1963, or watching an African-American hero, (Dr. Ben Carson or any other conservative speaker)
NEWS
By Charlie Vascellaro | April 22, 2013
Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic "42" carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate. While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson's unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Having just seen the wonderful film, "42," the other day, I, too, was struck by the absence of a mention of the Baltimore Afro-American's Sam Lacy in the sports reporting of such a momentous time in baseball, America's and civil rights history. Your article, "Sam Lacy's son upset by father's absence from '42'" (April 16) reveals Tim Lacy's surprise and hurt by the absence of any mention of his father's name despite all of his reporting as an eyewitness to history with Wendell Smith (the Pittsburgh Courier editor-reporter featured in the movie)
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
The new Jackie Robinson movie “42” starring Chadwick Boseman, Nicole Beharie and Harrison Ford is getting mixed reviews for its depiction of the man who broke baseball's color barrier. But at least one local person is incensed that the Warner Bros. film fails to mention the role played by Sam Lacy, the long-time sports editor and columnist of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, in Robinson's ascension to the major leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. “I think it's a travesty,”Tim Lacy, Sam Lacy's son, said of his father's exclusion in “42.” “Because if you know the story, [Sam Lacy]
NEWS
February 4, 2007
In celebration of African-American History Month, the east Columbia library will sponsor a program on baseball Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson, "Two Sides of Jackie Robinson: Pioneer in Baseball and Civil Rights Advocate." The presentation is to include slides and other materials from the collection of the National Archives. The program is scheduled for 7 p.m. Feb. 12. Registration is required. The library invites teenagers to share ideas for transforming its teen area, which is in need of redesign.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2008
When Orioles manager Dave Trembley requested that Adam Jones stop by his office during the rainout in Texas last week, the young center fielder assumed that he had done something wrong. Rarely does a player receive good news in these instances. Jones was pleased and relieved to find out that Trembley wanted him to wear No. 42, with no name on the back of the jersey, for last night's game as part of Jackie Robinson Day, which honors the player who broke major league baseball's color barrier.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
The intense stare is captured, the look of a slugger tracking a ball hit well into the night. The bat is dangling from the bronzed Frank Robinson's left hand. “I'm looking at the ball going out in the outfield, but I am ready to drop that bat and get my damn butt down the bases,” the flesh-and-bones Robinson quipped Saturday evening. “I don't want to stay up there [at the plate] too long.” Robinson, the Hall of Fame outfielder who led the Orioles to their first world championship in 1966 and a string of three more World Series appearances in the next five years, on Saturday became the first player to have his likeness replicated in a life-size bronze statue in the Garden of the Greats picnic area behind center field at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
On a warm, sunny afternoon at the Maritime Industries Academy baseball field, posters honoring members of the Negro leagues hung on the outfield fence and dust swirled under the banner honoring Jackie Robinson at home plate. Members of the Maritime and Southside Academies wore gray and blue pin-striped replica uniform shirts of two teams that played in the NL — the Baltimore Black Sox (Maritime) and the Baltimore Elite Giants (Southside). And they played with wooden bats. In this, the 1st Annual Negro League Appreciation Game, the Maritime Black Sox won, 11-1, in five innings, with pitcher Devont'e Lewis striking out 14 and allowing just one hit while going the distance.
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