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Jackie Mclean

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By DAN RODRICKS | December 8, 1993
So what I hear Jackie McLean saying is that she honest-to-god thought her husband had sold that building in Federal Hill and that she had no idea -- I mean, it didn't even cross her mind -- to tell anyone on the Board of Estimates that, gee, there might be a conflict of interest in the city paying, oh, about a million bucks over 10 years to lease the place.All who believe that, so indicate by raising their hands.Seeing none, we shall conclude that the fuel-indicator light on Jackie McLean's credibility tank is blinking red, which is a terrible thing for the comptroller of Baltimore.
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NEWS
April 10, 2006
Gene Pitney, 65, whose keening tenor voice produced a string of hits including "Town Without Pity" was found dead in his hotel room in Cardiff, Wales, while on a tour of Britain. He died Wednesday, apparently of natural causes, after playing a concert Tuesday night. During a long career, he had hits as a singer including "24 Hours from Tulsa," "(The Man Who Shot) Liberty Valance," and "Half Heaven, Half Heartache." As a writer, he penned "Hello Mary Lou" for Ricky Nelson and "Rubber Ball" for Bobby Vee. In 1962, Mr. Pitney had the top two songs on the U.S. chart - his rendition of "Only Love Can Break a Heart" was at No. 2, just behind a song he wrote for The Crystals, "He's a Rebel."
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NEWS
February 10, 2005
Jimmy Smith, 79, an award-winning jazz organist who was considered a pioneer with the instrument, died Tuesday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. Smith ruled the Hammond B-3 organ in the 1950s and 1960s, fusing rhythm and blues, blues and gospel influences with bebop references. His sessions with Blue Note from 1956 to 1963 included collaborations with Kenny Burrell, Lee Morgan, Lou Donaldson, Tina Brooks, Jackie McLean, Ike Quebec and Stanley Turrentine. An album with fellow organist Joey DeFrancesco, Legacy, is scheduled for release next week.
NEWS
February 10, 2005
Jimmy Smith, 79, an award-winning jazz organist who was considered a pioneer with the instrument, died Tuesday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. Smith ruled the Hammond B-3 organ in the 1950s and 1960s, fusing rhythm and blues, blues and gospel influences with bebop references. His sessions with Blue Note from 1956 to 1963 included collaborations with Kenny Burrell, Lee Morgan, Lou Donaldson, Tina Brooks, Jackie McLean, Ike Quebec and Stanley Turrentine. An album with fellow organist Joey DeFrancesco, Legacy, is scheduled for release next week.
NEWS
September 16, 1991
The dramatic redistricting plan pushed through the Baltimore City Council earlier this year was no match for the power of incumbency. Only three incumbents who sought re-election were defeated. And despite early expectations that the new destrict arrangement would increase black representation, the new council will have only one more black member than the current body.Even so, with two council members having declined to seek re-election in order to run for comptroller, there will be enough fresh faces to make a difference.
NEWS
April 10, 2006
Gene Pitney, 65, whose keening tenor voice produced a string of hits including "Town Without Pity" was found dead in his hotel room in Cardiff, Wales, while on a tour of Britain. He died Wednesday, apparently of natural causes, after playing a concert Tuesday night. During a long career, he had hits as a singer including "24 Hours from Tulsa," "(The Man Who Shot) Liberty Valance," and "Half Heaven, Half Heartache." As a writer, he penned "Hello Mary Lou" for Ricky Nelson and "Rubber Ball" for Bobby Vee. In 1962, Mr. Pitney had the top two songs on the U.S. chart - his rendition of "Only Love Can Break a Heart" was at No. 2, just behind a song he wrote for The Crystals, "He's a Rebel."
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | December 23, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- The winter solstice is past, the hours of light grow daily longer. In many faiths this is a time of renewed hope and important ritual. Here it has become the most anti-religious season of the year.That's anti-religious, not irreligious. Religious trappings, of course, are everywhere, which is part of the problem. The Christmas season as currently conducted in most of our country does for spirituality what Sister Boom-Boom does nationally for the cause of gay rights, or what Jackie McLean does locally for the reputation of Baltimore's municipal government.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITWIN | December 24, 1993
It's that time of year again. The mistletoe is hung with care. And, boy, is it ever crowded underneath.You've got the Donald and Marla. You've got Julia and Lyle. You've got Jack Kent Cooke and Joe De Francis. You've got Rush Limbaugh and his favorite person -- himself -- in a real smooch-athon. You've got the prez and, if you believe the stories, half the women in Arkansas.And I've got this big stack of holiday greetings that never got sent out. Jackie McLean promised she'd do it, but it seems she got some of the addresses mixed up.L So, I'm forced to send them the cheap way. Meaning, you pay.Here goes.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | December 25, 1993
The lawyer for Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean yesterday brushed aside the mayor's suggestion that she consider resigning in the wake of misconduct allegations mounting against her.Instead, William H. Murphy Jr. lashed out at what he called irresponsible and racially divisive news media coverage of the remarks Mrs. McLean made this week when she said she was stepping aside until the investigation of her activities is finished.Appearing without his client at a news conference in his Mount Vernon law office, Mr. Murphy denied that Mrs. McLean ever said or implied that the investigation of her activities is racially motivated.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1991
They began singing "I'm Just Wild About Jackie" at the Governor's Club party when 87 percent of the votes for comptroller were in and Jackie McLean was surging ahead.Kenny Webster, McLean's campaign manager, chalked up the figures: Mary Conaway 12,713; Jody Landers 27,677 . . .McLean's workers chanted "GO! GO! GO! GO! GO!"Webster wrote McLean 35,451.Now, McLean's workers exploded cheering and Dave Bunn's Quintet was playing "Happy Days Are Here Again."Half an hour later as McLean was winning by 10,000, her workers sang James Brown's "Living in America," and the candidate appeared on the stand, handsome in a purple linen jacket, floral dress, smiling one big, wide, radiant smile, and claiming victory.
NEWS
September 8, 1994
Former City Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean pleaded guilty last week to stealing thousands in taxpayer dollars. Yesterday, Judge Donald J. Gilmore, a retired Carroll County circuit judge, found her also guilty of misconduct in office by arranging a $1 million municipal lease of the one-time headquarters of her family's now-defunct travel agency.The next scheduled development is her sentencing in December. After months of legal hijinks and sensational publicity about her mental problems, there will be no trial.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | December 25, 1993
The lawyer for Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean yesterday brushed aside the mayor's suggestion that she consider resigning in the wake of misconduct allegations mounting against her.Instead, William H. Murphy Jr. lashed out at what he called irresponsible and racially divisive news media coverage of the remarks Mrs. McLean made this week when she said she was stepping aside until the investigation of her activities is finished.Appearing without his client at a news conference in his Mount Vernon law office, Mr. Murphy denied that Mrs. McLean ever said or implied that the investigation of her activities is racially motivated.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITWIN | December 24, 1993
It's that time of year again. The mistletoe is hung with care. And, boy, is it ever crowded underneath.You've got the Donald and Marla. You've got Julia and Lyle. You've got Jack Kent Cooke and Joe De Francis. You've got Rush Limbaugh and his favorite person -- himself -- in a real smooch-athon. You've got the prez and, if you believe the stories, half the women in Arkansas.And I've got this big stack of holiday greetings that never got sent out. Jackie McLean promised she'd do it, but it seems she got some of the addresses mixed up.L So, I'm forced to send them the cheap way. Meaning, you pay.Here goes.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | December 23, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- The winter solstice is past, the hours of light grow daily longer. In many faiths this is a time of renewed hope and important ritual. Here it has become the most anti-religious season of the year.That's anti-religious, not irreligious. Religious trappings, of course, are everywhere, which is part of the problem. The Christmas season as currently conducted in most of our country does for spirituality what Sister Boom-Boom does nationally for the cause of gay rights, or what Jackie McLean does locally for the reputation of Baltimore's municipal government.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 8, 1993
So what I hear Jackie McLean saying is that she honest-to-god thought her husband had sold that building in Federal Hill and that she had no idea -- I mean, it didn't even cross her mind -- to tell anyone on the Board of Estimates that, gee, there might be a conflict of interest in the city paying, oh, about a million bucks over 10 years to lease the place.All who believe that, so indicate by raising their hands.Seeing none, we shall conclude that the fuel-indicator light on Jackie McLean's credibility tank is blinking red, which is a terrible thing for the comptroller of Baltimore.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 20, 1992
No one ever accused Jacqueline McLean of having trouble speaking for herself -- but, with City Hall tightening its financial belt everywhere, she has now hired a professional mouthpiece just the same.And she thinks anybody who questions the hire is blowing it wildly out of proportion.But then, she always does.The city comptroller thought it was no big deal when she had the city buy her a luxury car, and no big deal when she didn't tell the truth about it, and then she thought it was no big deal when she had a lavish inauguration night party to which she invited people who would be doing business with the city.
NEWS
September 8, 1994
Former City Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean pleaded guilty last week to stealing thousands in taxpayer dollars. Yesterday, Judge Donald J. Gilmore, a retired Carroll County circuit judge, found her also guilty of misconduct in office by arranging a $1 million municipal lease of the one-time headquarters of her family's now-defunct travel agency.The next scheduled development is her sentencing in December. After months of legal hijinks and sensational publicity about her mental problems, there will be no trial.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
During her campaign for city comptroller last fall, Jacqueline McLean pledged that things would change if she was elected. Now, some six months after she succeeded Hyman Aaron Pressman, a Baltimore institution in that job for 28 years, heads have begun to roll. Three senior officials have been let go. She calls the staff changes a "reorganization." Her critics say it is a "purge."Mrs. McLean says "the matter of my trying to get more efficiency" was behind the termination of Deputy Auditor Bert Finkelstein, Assistant Comptroller Erwin A. Burtnick and Ronald Brown, the head of the municipal telephone exchange.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
During her campaign for city comptroller last fall, Jacqueline McLean pledged that things would change if she was elected. Now, some six months after she succeeded Hyman Aaron Pressman, a Baltimore institution in that job for 28 years, heads have begun to roll. Three senior officials have been let go. She calls the staff changes a "reorganization." Her critics say it is a "purge."Mrs. McLean says "the matter of my trying to get more efficiency" was behind the termination of Deputy Auditor Bert Finkelstein, Assistant Comptroller Erwin A. Burtnick and Ronald Brown, the head of the municipal telephone exchange.
NEWS
September 16, 1991
The dramatic redistricting plan pushed through the Baltimore City Council earlier this year was no match for the power of incumbency. Only three incumbents who sought re-election were defeated. And despite early expectations that the new destrict arrangement would increase black representation, the new council will have only one more black member than the current body.Even so, with two council members having declined to seek re-election in order to run for comptroller, there will be enough fresh faces to make a difference.
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