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By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 16, 1990
In the wonderful world of celebrity, lunch is more than just a meal -- it's an opportunity for grand conversation. Who better to kick off this column than Jackie Collins, who spends nights eavesdropping at such eateries as Spago, then arises the next morning to catalog every last smidgen of dirt on a yellow legal tablet.The scribblings eventually become best-selling books. Her new book, "Lady Boss," is the sequel to "Lucky." Both books chronicle the fast life of Lucky Santangelo, a tough, beautiful Italian who takes on Hollywood and wins!
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2004
The Best Awful, by Carrie Fisher. Simon & Schuster. 272 pages. $24. Is mental illness funny? Suzanne Vale, the heroine of actress Carrie Fisher's fourth Hollywood novel, says it had better be. Having survived drug abuse and rehab in Fisher's debut, Postcards From the Edge, Suzanne rides the dizzying ups and terrifying downs of bipolar disorder in The Best Awful, emerging to crack jokes at benefits and otherwise comfort the similarly afflicted. Given her history with controlled substances, it's no surprise that Suzanne brings disaster on herself.
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FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | October 3, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Jackie Collins takes great pride in the story: It's about Chinese officials banning her steamy novels because they feared she was corrupting Chinese youth. But when the soldiers went to confiscate more than 200,000 pirated copies of her books at stores, they came up empty-handed."They couldn't find any because they were bought so quickly," Collins said with delight.Collins' novels, though, are always snapped up quickly. They are sure-fire best sellers and have sold 100 million copies in 30 countries.
NEWS
October 24, 2003
On Tuesday, October 21, 2003, JOHN F., JR. beloved husband of the late Mary A. (nee Diggs), devoted father of Mary Olwine, John Riggs III, Debbie and John Tivvis, Brenda and Michael Collins, Jackie Collins and William Riggs; brother of Arlene Hammel and her husband George. Also survived by eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Friends may call at Loring Byers Funeral Directors, 8728 Liberty Road (2 miles west of Beltway Exit 18-B), on Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M., where prayers will be said on Saturday at 11 A.M. Interment Lakeview Memorial Park.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 8, 1998
Sex - from outset to ending. There is barely a page without it - overt acts, perverse acts, sexual allusions.Beyond that, everything is ravishingly glamorous - people, clothing, jewelry, restaurants, houses, automobiles. It's an encyclopedia of status toys. The names of the characters are - well, purposeful: Harry Solitaire, Lara Ivory.The sentences are very short, active voice, declarative. Very few dependent clauses. Frequent dashes. Ellipses are scattered as pepper on egg white. Four lines is a long paragraph.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 16, 2002
The reasons why readers devour mass pop fiction are far murkier than the counterplots and suspense devices that often drive them. To discriminating readers, more than half of most fiction bestseller lists are indigestible dreck. Grasping for understanding, from time to time I read a random example of brand-name commercial fiction. My latest test drive is Deadly Embrace, by Jackie Collins (Simon & Schuster, 517 pages, $26). It begins on July 10, 2001, in Los Angeles, where the reader meets Madison Castelli, who has just flown in from New York.
NEWS
October 23, 2003
On Tuesday, October 21, 2003, JOHN F., JR. beloved husband of the late Mary A. (nee Diggs), devoted father of Mary Olwine, John Riggs III, Debbie Tivvis, Brenda Collins, Jackie Collins and William Riggs; brother of Arlene Hammel and her husband George. Also survived by eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Friends may call at Loring Byers Funeral Directors, 8728 Liberty Road (2 miles west of Beltway Exit 18-B), on Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M., where prayers will be said on Saturday at 11 A.M. Interment Lakeview Memorial Park.
FEATURES
By KASEY JONES The New York Theatre Sourcebook. Chuck Lawliss. Fireside. 367 pages. $12.95 (paperback) | October 28, 1990
Lady Boss.Jackie Collins.Simon and Schuster.608 pages. $21.95.Trashy-novel queen Jackie Collins continues the saga oLucky Santangelo in this third book detailing the adventures of ,, the Mafia princess. We find Lucky bored with marital bliss (she married up-and-coming comedian Lennie Golden) and plotting the takeover of Panther Studios. The once-venerable movie company is now reduced to making violent, sexist trash that scores big hits at the box office.But before curmudgeonly Abe Panther will sell his beloved studio to Lucky, he insists she learn about the movie business.
NEWS
October 7, 1994
HERE'S what the Philadelphia Daily News had to say about the new book alleging that the Princess of Wales had an affair with her riding instructor:"James Hewitt is a bounder. Also a cad and most likely a poltroon."He has improved his station in life in the traditional British way, through carnal knowledge of his betters and a fat payoff for telling all."And we thought the Empire fell because of historical forces. More likely, it was simple embarrassment."Hewitt is an unemployed retired cavalry major who once served as Princess Diana's riding instructor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2004
The Best Awful, by Carrie Fisher. Simon & Schuster. 272 pages. $24. Is mental illness funny? Suzanne Vale, the heroine of actress Carrie Fisher's fourth Hollywood novel, says it had better be. Having survived drug abuse and rehab in Fisher's debut, Postcards From the Edge, Suzanne rides the dizzying ups and terrifying downs of bipolar disorder in The Best Awful, emerging to crack jokes at benefits and otherwise comfort the similarly afflicted. Given her history with controlled substances, it's no surprise that Suzanne brings disaster on herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 16, 2002
The reasons why readers devour mass pop fiction are far murkier than the counterplots and suspense devices that often drive them. To discriminating readers, more than half of most fiction bestseller lists are indigestible dreck. Grasping for understanding, from time to time I read a random example of brand-name commercial fiction. My latest test drive is Deadly Embrace, by Jackie Collins (Simon & Schuster, 517 pages, $26). It begins on July 10, 2001, in Los Angeles, where the reader meets Madison Castelli, who has just flown in from New York.
FEATURES
By Gary Dretzka and Gary Dretzka,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2001
HOLLYWOOD - If you're going to be stuck in traffic on the way to the Beverly Hills Hotel, what better companion to have riding shotgun than Jackie Collins, or, at least, the disembodied voice of Jackie Collins, as she reads her latest guilty pleasure, Hollywood Wives: The New Generation, over the car audio system. Author of more than 20 best sellers, this effervescent Briton knows more about what's going on in Los Angeles than a dozen radio talk show hosts. Collins' novels may not win kudos from critics, but try making sense of Ulysses while lurching down the Santa Monica Freeway at rush hour.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 8, 1998
Sex - from outset to ending. There is barely a page without it - overt acts, perverse acts, sexual allusions.Beyond that, everything is ravishingly glamorous - people, clothing, jewelry, restaurants, houses, automobiles. It's an encyclopedia of status toys. The names of the characters are - well, purposeful: Harry Solitaire, Lara Ivory.The sentences are very short, active voice, declarative. Very few dependent clauses. Frequent dashes. Ellipses are scattered as pepper on egg white. Four lines is a long paragraph.
NEWS
October 7, 1994
HERE'S what the Philadelphia Daily News had to say about the new book alleging that the Princess of Wales had an affair with her riding instructor:"James Hewitt is a bounder. Also a cad and most likely a poltroon."He has improved his station in life in the traditional British way, through carnal knowledge of his betters and a fat payoff for telling all."And we thought the Empire fell because of historical forces. More likely, it was simple embarrassment."Hewitt is an unemployed retired cavalry major who once served as Princess Diana's riding instructor.
FEATURES
By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 16, 1990
In the wonderful world of celebrity, lunch is more than just a meal -- it's an opportunity for grand conversation. Who better to kick off this column than Jackie Collins, who spends nights eavesdropping at such eateries as Spago, then arises the next morning to catalog every last smidgen of dirt on a yellow legal tablet.The scribblings eventually become best-selling books. Her new book, "Lady Boss," is the sequel to "Lucky." Both books chronicle the fast life of Lucky Santangelo, a tough, beautiful Italian who takes on Hollywood and wins!
FEATURES
By KASEY JONES The New York Theatre Sourcebook. Chuck Lawliss. Fireside. 367 pages. $12.95 (paperback) | October 28, 1990
Lady Boss.Jackie Collins.Simon and Schuster.608 pages. $21.95.Trashy-novel queen Jackie Collins continues the saga oLucky Santangelo in this third book detailing the adventures of ,, the Mafia princess. We find Lucky bored with marital bliss (she married up-and-coming comedian Lennie Golden) and plotting the takeover of Panther Studios. The once-venerable movie company is now reduced to making violent, sexist trash that scores big hits at the box office.But before curmudgeonly Abe Panther will sell his beloved studio to Lucky, he insists she learn about the movie business.
FEATURES
By Gary Dretzka and Gary Dretzka,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2001
HOLLYWOOD - If you're going to be stuck in traffic on the way to the Beverly Hills Hotel, what better companion to have riding shotgun than Jackie Collins, or, at least, the disembodied voice of Jackie Collins, as she reads her latest guilty pleasure, Hollywood Wives: The New Generation, over the car audio system. Author of more than 20 best sellers, this effervescent Briton knows more about what's going on in Los Angeles than a dozen radio talk show hosts. Collins' novels may not win kudos from critics, but try making sense of Ulysses while lurching down the Santa Monica Freeway at rush hour.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | October 3, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Jackie Collins takes great pride in the story: It's about Chinese officials banning her steamy novels because they feared she was corrupting Chinese youth. But when the soldiers went to confiscate more than 200,000 pirated copies of her books at stores, they came up empty-handed."They couldn't find any because they were bought so quickly," Collins said with delight.Collins' novels, though, are always snapped up quickly. They are sure-fire best sellers and have sold 100 million copies in 30 countries.
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