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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 25, 1998
If film in 1997 will be remembered for anything other than the Big Boat, it might be remembered as a year when films by, about and starring African-Americans made some quiet strides.Consider such breakout hits as "Soul Food," a family drama starring some of the hottest African-American actors in Hollywood, and "Eve's Bayou," the most commercially successful independent film of 1997. Consider the broadening of themes in such films as "Rosewood," "Hoodlum" and "Love Jones." Consider a year that started out with "Booty Call" and "B.A.
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NEWS
February 8, 2004
On February 1, 2004, WALTER R. SPENCER, father of Mwanawa S.Q. and Pili A. Houston. Also survived by his siblings, Lamont R., Dartagnan E., and Paulette M. Spencer, Jackie Brown, and a host of other relatives and friends. Family will receive friends on Tuesday. Visitation: 11 A.M. Memorial Service: 11:30 A.M. at DuBurns Arena, 1301 S. Ellwood Ave. Inquiries @ www.wyliefuneralhome.com
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NEWS
February 8, 2004
On February 1, 2004, WALTER R. SPENCER, father of Mwanawa S.Q. and Pili A. Houston. Also survived by his siblings, Lamont R., Dartagnan E., and Paulette M. Spencer, Jackie Brown, and a host of other relatives and friends. Family will receive friends on Tuesday. Visitation: 11 A.M. Memorial Service: 11:30 A.M. at DuBurns Arena, 1301 S. Ellwood Ave. Inquiries @ www.wyliefuneralhome.com
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 11, 2003
Six years have passed since Quentin Tarantino's last film, and not since Terrence Malick took a 20-year hiatus between Days of Heaven (1978) and The Thin Red Line (1998) has a director's return to the screen been more widely anticipated. Chat rooms have dedicated themselves to the topic. Speculation has known no bounds - was he suffering from chronic writer's block? Was he drying out someplace? Was he too demanding? Too sensitive to criticism? Just too plain weird for Hollywood? Kill Bill - Vol. 1 ends the drought, and its quality (as well as its assortment of patented Tarantino touches)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1997
It's a pleasure to report that "Jackie Brown" is unevenly paced, lethargic and sometimes even boring. Because even though it is mediocre as a movie, as an example of a filmmaker in transition, it is a triumph.With his eagerly anticipated follow-up to "Pulp Fiction" -- that 1994 masterpiece of scattershot editing, addiction to pop culture and Ritalin-deprived dialogue -- Quentin Tarantino seems to be slowing himself down, choosing to focus on characters as complex bundles of motivations rather than vectors for grand gestures and punchy aphorisms.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | November 1, 1992
The day Jackie Brown took over her new job as the Howard County school system's human relations coordinator, a Ku Klux Klan member was spotted passing out hate literature to students at a county elementary school.The recruitment leaflets included a prominent picture of Mickey Mouse engaged in an obscene gesture. Underneath the picture were the words, "Hey, nigger!"That was a poignant beginning for Ms. Brown. She keeps a copy of the leaflet hanging in her office. But you can seldom find her there.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 25, 1998
One of the most remarkable things about 1997 was that two prominent white filmmakers -- both directors who can call their own shots -- made films featuring African-Americans in prominent roles. And, because those filmmakers were Steven Spielberg and Quentin Tarantino, both approached their subjects in totally different ways.Spielberg, who directed "Amistad" after producer Debbie Allen spent more than a dozen years shopping the project to Hollywood studios, filmed the African characters of the film at a reverent, painterly distance, his respect often approaching worship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine An American Werewolf in Paris | December 25, 1997
Jackie BrownMusic from the Miramax Motion Picture (Maverick 46841)Curtis MayfieldSuperfly (Rhino 72836)One of the best things about the "blaxploitation" flicks of the '70s was their soundtracks. Films like "Shaft," "Superfly" and "Slaughter's Big Rip-Off" may not have been masterpieces of the cinema, but the music that went with those movies often verged on the classic.That Quentin Tarantino would try to evoke that vibe for his latest film shouldn't be too great a surprise. After all, "Pulp Fiction" and "Reservoir Dogs" got major mileage out of their use of oldies.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 11, 1998
James Cameron's "Titanic," the juggernaut that has proved all number of naysayers wrong by becoming one of the most successful films in history, sailed through the 70th Academy Award nominations yesterday, leaving a few small surprises in its wake.As expected, "Titanic" led the day with 14 nominations, tying with the 1950 film "All About Eve" for the record. The film has made more than $600 million worldwide since it was released to critical and audience acclaim in December, rendering silent the pundits and industry insiders who just months earlier predicted that the $200 million deep-sea epic would wind up an expensive wet blanket.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2002
The Howard County public school system has lost one of its greatest equity champions to Prince George's County. Jacqueline F. Brown, director of academic reform, worked her last day Friday. "I'm just floored," said Sandra H. French, Howard County Board of Education vice chairman. "Jackie Brown has been such and inspiration to all of us, such a very strong advocate for all children, especially children of minority backgrounds. ... I'll miss her greatly." Brown said yesterday that she could not reveal what she will be doing in Prince George's, though an announcement was expected today.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2002
The Afro is long gone. It's been years since she opted to step out in her bell-bottomed '70s regalia. And that determined, wronged-woman snarl that she flashed decades ago while bashing away baddies in the action movies that made her famous is missing from her face - at this moment anyway. But when Pam Grier strides into a room, it's clear she's still not one to mess with. Statuesque, confident and strikingly beautiful almost 30 years since she first hit the big-time with her string of femme-fatale roles, Grier entered an elegant hotel suite yesterday morning, sharply scanned her surroundings and declared, "How come I didn't get a room like this?"
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 11, 1998
James Cameron's "Titanic," the juggernaut that has proved all number of naysayers wrong by becoming one of the most successful films in history, sailed through the 70th Academy Award nominations yesterday, leaving a few small surprises in its wake.As expected, "Titanic" led the day with 14 nominations, tying with the 1950 film "All About Eve" for the record. The film has made more than $600 million worldwide since it was released to critical and audience acclaim in December, rendering silent the pundits and industry insiders who just months earlier predicted that the $200 million deep-sea epic would wind up an expensive wet blanket.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 25, 1998
One of the most remarkable things about 1997 was that two prominent white filmmakers -- both directors who can call their own shots -- made films featuring African-Americans in prominent roles. And, because those filmmakers were Steven Spielberg and Quentin Tarantino, both approached their subjects in totally different ways.Spielberg, who directed "Amistad" after producer Debbie Allen spent more than a dozen years shopping the project to Hollywood studios, filmed the African characters of the film at a reverent, painterly distance, his respect often approaching worship.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 25, 1998
If film in 1997 will be remembered for anything other than the Big Boat, it might be remembered as a year when films by, about and starring African-Americans made some quiet strides.Consider such breakout hits as "Soul Food," a family drama starring some of the hottest African-American actors in Hollywood, and "Eve's Bayou," the most commercially successful independent film of 1997. Consider the broadening of themes in such films as "Rosewood," "Hoodlum" and "Love Jones." Consider a year that started out with "Booty Call" and "B.A.
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