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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
A pitcher whose repertoire included smoke bombs, sneezing powder and live snakes. A catcher who bought cattle during road trips and hauled livestock in his Cadillac. An outfielder known to run the bases backward and spout maxims like, "This year I'm going to play with harder nonchalance." What strange birds these Orioles can be. Moe Drabowsky, Clint Courtney and Jackie Brandt are just three of the characters who have played for Baltimore through the years. "Every player has a few screws loose because of the pressure of that goldfish-bowl existence," said Dick Hall, an Orioles pitcher in the 1960s and '70s.
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By Sports Digest | July 31, 2010
Billy Loes , who pitched for the Orioles from 1956 to 1959 and was an All-Star in 1957, has died. He was 80. Loes died July 15 at a hospice in Tucson, Ariz., his wife, Irene , confirmed Friday from her home in Chapel Hill, N.C. He had diabetes for several years and had open heart surgery a few years ago, she said. Loes, a right-hander whose contract the Orioles purchased in 1956 for $20,000, went 12-7 with a 3.24 ERA in 1957. He was 21-30 in four seasons with the Orioles before they dealt him to the San Francisco Giants with Billy O'Dell for Jackie Brandt , Gordon Jones and Roger McCardell . Loes pitched on three pennant-winning Brooklyn Dodgers teams in the 1950s and also played for the Giants (1960-61)
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SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | July 31, 2010
Billy Loes, who pitched for the Orioles from 1956 to 1959 and was an All-Star in 1957, has died. He was 80. Loes died July 15 at a hospice in Tucson, Ariz., his wife, Irene, confirmed Friday from her home in Chapel Hill, N.C. He had diabetes for several years and had open heart surgery a few years ago, she said. Loes, a right-hander whose contract the Orioles purchased in 1956 for $20,000, went 12-7 with a 3.24 ERA in 1957. He was 21-30 in four seasons with the Orioles before they dealt him to the San Francisco Giants with Billy O'Dell for Jackie Brandt, Gordon Jones and Roger McCardell.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
A pitcher whose repertoire included smoke bombs, sneezing powder and live snakes. A catcher who bought cattle during road trips and hauled livestock in his Cadillac. An outfielder known to run the bases backward and spout maxims like, "This year I'm going to play with harder nonchalance." What strange birds these Orioles can be. Moe Drabowsky, Clint Courtney and Jackie Brandt are just three of the characters who have played for Baltimore through the years. "Every player has a few screws loose because of the pressure of that goldfish-bowl existence," said Dick Hall, an Orioles pitcher in the 1960s and '70s.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | December 16, 1991
Boogie Weinglass dined at the Cross Keys Deli over the weekend and the would-be owner of an NFL franchise here was the picture of happiness.He wore a maroon sport coat, black turtleneck shirt and black trousers, disdaining his customary tight jeans and T-shirt.He moved about the room, receiving compliments on his appearance.He mingled with people, complete strangers, who told him their sons or daughters had gone to school with him here.Boogie was overjoyed over his meeting with NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue and league officials in New York last week.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1995
He had a major-league career of 11 years, and was a member of the Orioles' celebrated Kiddie Korps, but Fat Jack Fisher may be best remembered as the answer to a trivia question.Who gave up Ted Williams' final home run, No. 521, and, almost a year to the day later, Roger Maris' historic 60th?Fisher, who owns Fat Jack's, a sports bar in Easton, Pa., has recounted the stories dozens of times.He came on in relief of "my roomie on the road," Steve Barber, that day in late September 1960 in Boston.
FEATURES
April 2, 2001
The 2001 major league season begins today with the Baltimore Orioles at a crossroads, shifting away from a dependence on veterans and free agents and toward a more youthful cast featuring homegrown talent. But this isn't the first time in the club's long history that it has undertaken such a change. In 1960, with a group of rookie pitchers nicknamed the "Kiddie Corps" and an assortment of other new faces, the Orioles managed to challenge the New York Yankees for the American League pennant for the first time.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun Reporter | February 9, 2008
When Mike Mussina embraced the bright lights and big money of New York in 2000, the Orioles were left without an ace, a No. 1 pitcher who evokes fear in the opponent and gives his team the belief that it will win every time he is on the mound. That void lasted until 2006, when hard-throwing, low-talking lefty Erik Bedard truly emerged. He gained national prominence last season when he was a legitimate Cy Young candidate before missing September with a strained oblique. So why, after being without one for so long, would the Orioles deal away a 28-year-old homegrown ace for five unproven players?
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | August 24, 1995
On a sunny afternoon in Toronto the day before the 1991 All-Star Game, before 44,000 fans at SkyDome, Cal Ripken got hot in a home run hitting contest. Red-hot.One ball after another leaped off his bat and buzzed over the left-field wall. He hit home runs on his first, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth swings. Seven homers in eight swings."Good gosh, buddy, cool off," said Oakland Athletics coach Rene Lachemann, who was catching."I know, I know," Ripken said. "I don't believe this."
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
No sooner had the Orioles' Brady Anderson hit his 46th home run than a message was recorded on Jim Gentile's telephone answering machine in Edmond, Okla."
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