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NEWS
June 25, 2004
JACKIE TROVATO, Age 73, former resident of Baltimore, MD, a resident of Los Lunas, NM since 1967, died Tuesday, June 22, 2004. She is survived by her husband of 54 years, Greg Trovato; three daughters Michelle Trovato, Tia Reid and Janan Franklin; five grandchildren Jessie Weber, Cory and Nicole Reid, Justin and Jaron Franklin and sister Gerry Chico. Funeral Services will be held at San Clemente Catholic Church, 224 Luna Ave in Los Lunas, NM on Friday, June 25, 2004 at 2 P.M. Cremation will follow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
"I've always loathed the necessity of sleep. Like death, it puts even the most powerful men on their backs. " -- Frank Underwood While Gavin strokes Cashew and tracks someone by GPS from his secret lair, Doug is in Joppa, having Rachel read scripture to him. She breaks from her reading to tell Doug that she's moved Lisa in. Doug does not approve, but has to rush back to Washington to help Frank handle a crisis before anything is settled. Doug arrives in Washington, but Frank has already had Seth Grayson handle the tasks that he wanted Doug to do. Seth has made himself rather valuable lately, hasn't he?
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | June 11, 1991
Narrator Peter Graves gets it just about right when he says tonight that "we always call her 'Jackie,' as if we really knew her." But as shown by tonight's edition of the series "Biography," at 8 p.m. on the Arts & Entertainment basic cable service, we only think we knew Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.The show unequivocally, and perhaps accurately, states the widow of President Kennedy "became the most famous person in the world." Yet writer William F. Buckley, one of a number of public commentators interviewed in the show, observes most acutely that in spite of the fanatical interest of the tabloids, "she gives up just enough of herself to keep from being invisible."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
In 2010, a blond-haired girl with a sweet smile stood before the "America's Got Talent" studio audience and millions of TV viewers. The 10-year-old proceeded to sing about asking her daddy to grant her request. So far, so normal. But if the words had an appropriately childlike nature, the music was anything but juvenile - it was the aria "O mio babbino caro" from Puccini's "Gianni Schicchi," ordinarily sung by sopranos who have at the very least reached their late teens, and who have gone through years of operatic training.
NEWS
April 14, 1991
Services will be conducted at 3 p.m. today for Jackie Sterns Potts of Columbia, a Howard Community College instructor who ran a computer graphics company.Potts was the last person identified among the 23 people killed in the April 4 crash of a commuter plane near Brunswick, Ga.The services will be at the Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home in Silver Spring.Potts was traveling with a friend, June T. Amlie of Bethesda, looking at retirement homes in Georgia, said her son, James Hutchison Potts III of Mount Airy.
NEWS
By Drew Limsky and Drew Limsky,Special to The Sun | May 14, 1995
"Jackie Under My Skin," by Wayne Koestenbaum. Illustrated. 291 pages. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. $21 Wayne Koestenbaum has written a book about everything that comes into his head when he thinks of Jackie Kennedy. The result is not biography. "Jackie Under My Skin" is primarily a record of Koestenbaum's private repertoire of pop-culture connections and his ability to free-associate in the argot of literary theory.It is difficult to imagine the audience for a diary about a tabloid Jackie written in academese: "Looking at Jackie, interpreting her resonances," Koestenbaum writes, "I use her image to confirm my vision, to bolster my place in the world," and he means it. The author unveils his own precious observations - the cellophane window on a box of Chiclets "reminds me of the shape of Jackie's clutch purse" - in a deadpan voice that never quite makes it to irony, and treats headlines from the National Enquirer texts.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 4, 2001
IT'S ANOTHER glorious evening of big hair and cleavage under the white dome at Bohager's, where the Bud Light flows like there's no tomorrow and so many people smoke you wonder if any of the surgeon general's reports on tobacco ever made it to Fells Point. Right now, I am shoehorned into the VIP room with about 75 others for a meet-and-greet with studly Jason Cerbone, who played mobster wanna-be Jackie Aprile Jr. in "The Sopranos," the hit HBO series about Jersey wise-guys and their existential angst.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 15, 1990
Everybody knows Jackie Robinson the fleet-footed slugger who broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers at the start of the 1947 season.Far less known, however, are robinson's civil rights struggles within the U.S. Army, a gap neatly filled tonight by "The Court Martial of Jackie Robinson." The original film premieres on basic cable's TBS service at 8 o'clock (with a repeat at 10 p.m., plus additional plays Oct 16, 18 and 21.)While our knowledge of Robinson's future makes the action reasonably predictable, the film conveys a fine sense of the rage and futility over bigotry which the athlete's subsequent success helped overcome in America -- or at least begin to overcome.
NEWS
By Franklin Mason | June 6, 1994
When I heard about Jackie, I knew she was in my house, if I could only find her.As everything is in my house, the books are stacked high. One day they'll crash and bury me. But not yet. I dig a little, and there is Jackie. And her sister, too, the two of them together in their book "One Special Summer." They were the Bouvier sisters then, way before the Kennedy days, Jackie 22 and Lee 18.It was their first time together in Europe. Jackie and Lee put together their book, a single copy, for their mother and stepfather as a way of thanking them for the summer.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 25, 1994
In America in the '90s, nothing succeeds like excess.Thus it was not enough to give Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis her proper place in history after her death. It was necessary to elevate it.And so I heard a radio newsman say in solemn tones on the day of her burial: "The queen of Camelot is being laid to rest next to her husband and their eternal flame."Their eternal flame? I thought it was Jack's eternal flame. I thought he was elected and died for his country. Jackie, as I recall, redecorated the White House.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Arundel High School sophomore Chloe Hill entered a screening of the motion picture "42" on Thursday indebted to the film's main character, baseball player Jackie Robinson. The film depicts Robinson's struggles and triumphs in becoming the first African-American to play in the major leagues, breaking the national pastime's color barrier on April 15, 1947. "Thanks to him, I'm able to play," said Hill, who is black and plays for Arundel High's junior varsity softball team. Hill was among 300 junior varsity baseball and softball players from all 12 Anne Arundel County public high schools to attend a screening hosted by OriolesREACH and Major League Baseball at Hoyt's West Nursery Cinemas in Linthicum.
NEWS
April 27, 2013
Thanks for your wonderful article about Sam Lacy ("How Sam Lacy helped integrate baseball," April 22). My husband and I were privileged to know Mr. Lacy during the last decade of his life and to hear directly from him what it was like during the days when Jackie Robinson broke into the majors. Sam's omission from "42" is indeed a travesty, to quote his son Tim. An equally apt word would be injustice. We are grateful to you for enlightening The Sun's readers about the pivotal role this modest, quiet, determined and gentle man played in establishing Major League Baseball as we know it today, and in recognizing that Jackie Robinson did indeed have the guts to let his skill do the fighting for him. Jan Roth
NEWS
April 25, 2013
As someone who came of age after the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, I was really struck and disturbed by some of the scenes in the Jackie Robinson movie, "42" ("'42' hits a homer at the box office," April 15). When you see the crowds in these scenes with their bigotry, anger, intolerance and narrow-mindedness, I am struck and confused, wondering if I am watching an African-American hero trying to integrate professional baseball in 1963, or watching an African-American hero, (Dr. Ben Carson or any other conservative speaker)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
Jacqueline M. "Jackie" Zajdel, a popular Canton cosmetologist who was a maestra of the shag, beehive, French twist and teased hair for decades, died Aug. 24 of cancer at Mercy Medical Center. The longtime Highlandtown resident was 67. Jacqueline Mary "Jackie" Zajdel was born in Baltimore and raised on Old North Point Road in Dundalk. She graduated in 1962 from Sparrows Point High School. "When she got out of high school, hairstyling was what she wanted to do, and she worked in a couple of shops in Dundalk," said her brother, Edwin "Zip" Zajdel, who lives in Joppa.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Wedding Day: October 27, 2012 Her story: Jackie Ennis, 30, grew up in the Ruxton area. She is a recruiter for Ultimate Staffing and lives in Towson. Her father, Dr. Len Ennis, is a cardiologist at Good Samaritan Hospital. Her mother, Celia Ennis, is a community volunteer. His story: Peter Obrecht, 29, grew up in Baltimore County. He is property manager for Obrecht Properties and lives in Towson. His father, George Obrecht, is a principal with Obrecht Properties. His mother, Suzanne Obrecht, is a community volunteer.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 20, 2012
Ravens coach John Harbaugh said his parents are doing well despite just being two days away from watching their sons play for conference championships. Harbaugh and the Ravens travel to Foxborough, Mass., to meet the New England Patriots on Sunday at 3 p.m. Less than four hours later, Jim Harbaugh and the San Francisco 49ers are scheduled to play host to the New York Giants. John Harbaugh was asked after Friday's practice about the emotional state of his parents, Jack and Jackie Harbaugh.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and JoAnna Daemmrich and Jay Apperson and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers | December 17, 1994
Mary Sue Welcome did not come to talk, as the psychiatrists did, about borderline personality disorders, suicidal ideation or therapeutic alliances.Instead, she spoke in personal terms of "My Jackie," the best friend whose public facade of stylish self-assurance obscured a private life marked by loneliness and fear of failure.As comptroller of Baltimore, Jacqueline F. McLean could be so impatient and sharp-tongued that many gave her wide berth. But Ms. Welcome's Jackie was a social misfit who pined for a better marriage and kept a bottle of vodka in her refrigerator to numb her despair.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 29, 1999
"Jackie: Behind the Myth" is one of the more misleading titles of the television season. Not only does the two-hour documentary on Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis not take us behind the myth, it so celebrates Jackie that you are certain the final scene is going to be played out on Mount Olympus.And yet, as maddening as it is in the unpleasant facts it ignores, the documentary is ultimately quite moving. In fact, it left me feeling more kindly disposed and impressed with her than I would have believed possible after all the Jackie hagiography I have endured these past 40 years or so.But let's start with some of the more outrageous punches it pulls, given the title.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 16, 2012
Jack and Jackie Harbaugh would seem to have a dilemma on their hands this Sunday: travel to Foxborough, Mass., to watch eldest son John and the Ravens meet the New England Patriots for the AFC championship at 3 p.m. EST or travel to San Francisco to watch younger son Jim and the 49ers play host to the New York Giants for the NFC crown at 6:30 p.m. EST. John Harbaugh said he's not sure what their parents plan to do. “I think it's pretty neat,”...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | December 7, 2011
Let's face it: there's too much new music in a year for any one human being to digest. "2011 Gems" is a December feature on Midnight Sun where I highlight some of the tracks that might have flown under your radar. First up is Jackie Chain's smooth tribute to his Southern rap lifestyle. The song is full of curse words so if that's not your thing, move right along. Jackie Chain, "Parked Outside (feat. Big K.R.I.T. and Bun B)" When I spoke with ST 2 Lettaz of G-Side last month, we talked about Alabama and how everyone has to drive around to get to anything.
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