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Jack Lemmon

FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
"Grumpier Old Men" is pretty feeble, but the charisma and charm of its stars -- who deserve so much better -- manages to sustain it.Walter Matthau, Jack Lemmon, Ann-Margret and Sophia Loren! Between them they have several decades' worth of screen greatness behind them, and here they are, at the far end of illustrious careers, in a lame, motiveless sitcom that's not up to Paramount Network TV standards.A sequel to the surprisingly successful "Grumpy Old Men" of 1993, this one takes place the following summer and it mostly watches the same characters -- Matthau and Lemmon are surly neighbors who've fought mock war for years, Ann-Margret is the sculptress who's married Lemmon -- wander around in a fog looking for traces of plot.
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The class was made up of some of the brightest college journalists from around the country.They were attending American University for a semester to learn all about "Washington Journalism."I was invited to speak to them.The title of my speech was: "I Have No Idea What Washington Journalism Is, But Most of It Stinks."The next day I got a call from one of the students."We each have to do a profile on one of the speakers," she said. "And I would like to interview you."No, I said.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 17, 1994
It's not exactly "Who killed Laura Palmer?," but tonight on "Models Inc." is the episode answering the question, "Who killed Teri Spencer?" Considering the viewership of this Fox series, though, the question more people may be pondering is, "Who IS Teri Spencer?"* "Models Inc." (9-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This may not be a killer of an episode, but at least it's got a killer in it -- and this week, he or she targets another victim. Fox.* "Turning Point." (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 17, 1994
That settles it. I'm taking heat leave, just as the guys in the Baltimore Housing Authority did last year. If the temperature reaches 100 degrees by noon, look for me in the frozen food section of your favorite supermarket. I'll be the heat-crazed geek dark glasses, tank top and cutoffs, opening the glass doors of freezer compartments, comparing the prices of fish sticks and taking my merry ole time about it. See you there.Hunting HelenWhen I think of Helen Delich Bentley's low-profile campaign for governor, I see the grin of Robert De Niro in "Cape Fear," and I hear his southern accent: "Come out, come out, wherevuh you ah."
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | December 23, 1993
Two decades ago, Jack Lemmon was asked on a television talk show who he considered to be the greatest actor in the world.Without hesitating, Mr. Lemmon related a story about a time early in his career when he was a theater usher in New York City. He worked at the very theater where a young sensation named Marlon Brando was turning the acting world on its ear in "A Streetcar Named Desire."Each night, Mr. Lemmon says, he watched in awe the work of the greatest actor in the world.Mr. Lemmon is reminded of the story and then is asked the same question he was posed 20 years ago. This time he hesitates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANDY SCHWARTZ/NEW LINE CINEMA and ANDY SCHWARTZ/NEW LINE CINEMA,Cox News Service | October 9, 1992
You'd think it was Jack Lemmon who was on top of the presidential polls, the way he works a hotel atrium: shaking hands, calling out greetings, poking a little fun at an old pal's waistline. Dressed like Everyone's Dad in a khaki jacket just right for mowing the lawn, he proclaims with relish, "I could smell it with this one!""Glengarry Glen Ross," that is -- his newest film, which opened last Friday.But then, perhaps no actor has a better nose for this movie's territory: the mean, mad, pinned-in-the-middle world of the American businessman.
NEWS
December 16, 1991
A few years ago there was a popular TV series called "The Lou Grant Show," in which Ed Asner played an old-fashioned managing editor of a big city daily newspaper. The program glamorized the newspaper business -- gathering the news involves mainly the grunt work of dialing the phone and pounding the pavement -- but the character portrayed by Asner was genuine: cranky, impatient, tough-minded, skeptical if not cynical, but ultimately a compassionate and revered father-figure all his staff.
BUSINESS
By M. Dion Thompson | December 13, 1991
John M. "Jack" Lemmon, managing editor of The Evening Su for the past 12 years, announced his retirement yesterday.Though Mr. Lemmon, 63, gave his official retirement date as Dec. 31, he said yesterday that "as a practical matter, today is my last day."During his tenure as the newspaper's top news executive, The Evening Sun received numerous awards, including a Pulitzer Prize."I think we had some good times. This was a happy place to work. Most of us enjoyed doing what we did," he said. "One of the most exciting things was a good story, having something in the paper that you're proud of."
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