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By M. Dion Thompson | December 13, 1991
John M. "Jack" Lemmon, managing editor of The Evening Su for the past 12 years, announced his retirement yesterday.Though Mr. Lemmon, 63, gave his official retirement date as Dec. 31, he said yesterday that "as a practical matter, today is my last day."During his tenure as the newspaper's top news executive, The Evening Sun received numerous awards, including a Pulitzer Prize."I think we had some good times. This was a happy place to work. Most of us enjoyed doing what we did," he said. "One of the most exciting things was a good story, having something in the paper that you're proud of."
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David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
NEW YORK - The green shoes. That's what caught my eye as I sat down across from Kevin Spacey at the Regency Hotel last week and took a mental snapshot of his outfit before asking the first question. Neat, gray pinstriped suit, with a charcoal shirt open at the collar - and green shoes. And you know what? He made it work. Spacey looked great. Unlike many film and TV stars, though, Spacey's appeal is far more than skin-deep. As much style as he has, the artistic and intellectual substance of Kevin Spacey is what impresses most.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 17, 1997
It is a safe bet that we won't see another made-for-television movie this season with the star power of Showtime's remake of "12 Angry Men," which airs tonight.At least not on the broadcast networks, where a blockbuster cast these days often means the likes of Brian Austin Green, Tori Spelling and a co-star from "Saved by the Bell."Tonight's starting lineup includes Jack Lemmon, Hume Cronyn, Courtney B. Vance, George C. Scott, Ossie Davis, Dorian Harewood, Edward James Olmos and Armin Mueller-Stahl, among others, under the direction of William Friedkin of "The Exorcist" and "The French Connection" fame.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
John M. "Jack" Lemmon, a veteran newspaperman who was the managing editor of The Evening Sun from 1979 to 1991, died of a heart attack yesterday morning at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 80. Mr. Lemmon, whose newspaper career spanned four decades, was born and raised in Mount Pleasant, Ill., the son of a businessman who admired H.L. Mencken and introduced his young son to the famed Baltimore newspaperman's journalism. After stints as a journalism professor and editing jobs at The Washington Star and The Washington Post, Mr. Lemmon was hired to run The Evening Sun, where decades earlier Mr. Mencken had earned his fame as a reporter and columnist.
NEWS
December 16, 1991
A few years ago there was a popular TV series called "The Lou Grant Show," in which Ed Asner played an old-fashioned managing editor of a big city daily newspaper. The program glamorized the newspaper business -- gathering the news involves mainly the grunt work of dialing the phone and pounding the pavement -- but the character portrayed by Asner was genuine: cranky, impatient, tough-minded, skeptical if not cynical, but ultimately a compassionate and revered father-figure all his staff.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 10, 1998
It seems somehow un-American to run down the eagerly awaited "Odd Couple II." It feels like criticizing your favorite uncle or golden retrievers or cold beer. But here goes: It just isn't funny.It's not that Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon still don't have the stuff; the "Grumpy Old Men" movies prove they're still nimble with physical comedy and the occasional vulgar mot juste. It's just that in "Odd Couple II" they have so few mots justes to toss off. This is perplexing, considering that Neil Simon, who wrote the original "Odd Couple," wrote the script for the sequel.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
"Grumpier Old Men" is pretty feeble, but the charisma and charm of its stars -- who deserve so much better -- manages to sustain it.Walter Matthau, Jack Lemmon, Ann-Margret and Sophia Loren! Between them they have several decades' worth of screen greatness behind them, and here they are, at the far end of illustrious careers, in a lame, motiveless sitcom that's not up to Paramount Network TV standards.A sequel to the surprisingly successful "Grumpy Old Men" of 1993, this one takes place the following summer and it mostly watches the same characters -- Matthau and Lemmon are surly neighbors who've fought mock war for years, Ann-Margret is the sculptress who's married Lemmon -- wander around in a fog looking for traces of plot.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The class was made up of some of the brightest college journalists from around the country.They were attending American University for a semester to learn all about "Washington Journalism."I was invited to speak to them.The title of my speech was: "I Have No Idea What Washington Journalism Is, But Most of It Stinks."The next day I got a call from one of the students."We each have to do a profile on one of the speakers," she said. "And I would like to interview you."No, I said.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 17, 1994
It's not exactly "Who killed Laura Palmer?," but tonight on "Models Inc." is the episode answering the question, "Who killed Teri Spencer?" Considering the viewership of this Fox series, though, the question more people may be pondering is, "Who IS Teri Spencer?"* "Models Inc." (9-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This may not be a killer of an episode, but at least it's got a killer in it -- and this week, he or she targets another victim. Fox.* "Turning Point." (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2000
His voice was a foghorn, he walked with the kind of slouch your mother always warned you about, his face looked like it never quite woke up. His picture deserved to be in the dictionary, right next to the word "rumpled." His perennial co-star, Jack Lemmon, once said of Walter Matthau, "He walks like a child's windup toy." Matthau, who died of heart failure last Saturday at age 79, fit no one's description of a movie star, but he was one. Not only that, he was one of those movie stars whose name always seems to have the word "beloved" somewhere nearby.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 1, 2002
The problem with Auto Focus is zero focus. It centers on the queasy, compelling figure of Bob Crane, the sitcom star who began leading a not-so-secret life of pickup sex and voyeurism shortly after he shot to fame in Hogan's Heroes. But director Paul Schrader and screenwriter Michael Gerbosi fail to get anything more out of his tale of erotic obsession and lethal results than a rise-and-fall story with a very swift rise and a very long fall, ending in Crane's murder. Greg Kinnear plays the personable Crane, who insists, with a smile, that his idea of sex is normal and everyone who condemns him is uptight.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2000
His voice was a foghorn, he walked with the kind of slouch your mother always warned you about, his face looked like it never quite woke up. His picture deserved to be in the dictionary, right next to the word "rumpled." His perennial co-star, Jack Lemmon, once said of Walter Matthau, "He walks like a child's windup toy." Matthau, who died of heart failure last Saturday at age 79, fit no one's description of a movie star, but he was one. Not only that, he was one of those movie stars whose name always seems to have the word "beloved" somewhere nearby.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2000
Walter Matthau, whose performances as cantankerous but endearing characters made him a distinctive leading man in movies, theater and television, died yesterday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 79. The cause was a heart attack, said Lindi Funston, a spokesman for St. John's Health Center, where Matthau died. Matthau's breakthrough role was as Oscar Madison, the slovenly sportswriter in Neil Simon's 1965 Broadway comedy and 1968 film "The Odd Couple." But that was only one of an extraordinarily diverse galaxy of characters.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 4, 1999
As fashionable as it might be to complain about the sorry state of network television these days, you have to admit the Sunday-night movies have been pretty good this year.Last week, it was James Garner and Julie Andrews in "One Special Night" on CBS, and this week it's Jack Lemmon and Hank Azaria in ABC's "Oprah Winfrey Presents: Tuesdays With Morrie."The "Oprah Winfrey" part of the title is important, because the film, which Winfrey produced for ABC, is only "inspired" by the best-selling book from Mitch Albom.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 2, 1999
Filmgoers old enough to remember the 1970 movie "The Out of Towners" will recall a harrowing comedy in which Sandy Dennis and Jack Lemmon duked it out with a ruthless New York City where anything that could go wrong, did. The comedy in that version, which was written by Neil Simon, was derived from elements as subtle as a box of Cracker Jacks or as blatant as an exploding manhole cover. No such classic moments emerge from this contemporized version of the movie, although Goldie Hawn and Steve Martin try to distract the audience from the absence of genuine wit. In "The Out-of-Towners" circa 1999, cross-dressing hotel managers and a few silly walks are expected to tide the audience over.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 10, 1998
It seems somehow un-American to run down the eagerly awaited "Odd Couple II." It feels like criticizing your favorite uncle or golden retrievers or cold beer. But here goes: It just isn't funny.It's not that Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon still don't have the stuff; the "Grumpy Old Men" movies prove they're still nimble with physical comedy and the occasional vulgar mot juste. It's just that in "Odd Couple II" they have so few mots justes to toss off. This is perplexing, considering that Neil Simon, who wrote the original "Odd Couple," wrote the script for the sequel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2000
Walter Matthau, whose performances as cantankerous but endearing characters made him a distinctive leading man in movies, theater and television, died yesterday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 79. The cause was a heart attack, said Lindi Funston, a spokesman for St. John's Health Center, where Matthau died. Matthau's breakthrough role was as Oscar Madison, the slovenly sportswriter in Neil Simon's 1965 Broadway comedy and 1968 film "The Odd Couple." But that was only one of an extraordinarily diverse galaxy of characters.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 2, 1999
Filmgoers old enough to remember the 1970 movie "The Out of Towners" will recall a harrowing comedy in which Sandy Dennis and Jack Lemmon duked it out with a ruthless New York City where anything that could go wrong, did. The comedy in that version, which was written by Neil Simon, was derived from elements as subtle as a box of Cracker Jacks or as blatant as an exploding manhole cover. No such classic moments emerge from this contemporized version of the movie, although Goldie Hawn and Steve Martin try to distract the audience from the absence of genuine wit. In "The Out-of-Towners" circa 1999, cross-dressing hotel managers and a few silly walks are expected to tide the audience over.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 17, 1997
It is a safe bet that we won't see another made-for-television movie this season with the star power of Showtime's remake of "12 Angry Men," which airs tonight.At least not on the broadcast networks, where a blockbuster cast these days often means the likes of Brian Austin Green, Tori Spelling and a co-star from "Saved by the Bell."Tonight's starting lineup includes Jack Lemmon, Hume Cronyn, Courtney B. Vance, George C. Scott, Ossie Davis, Dorian Harewood, Edward James Olmos and Armin Mueller-Stahl, among others, under the direction of William Friedkin of "The Exorcist" and "The French Connection" fame.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
Now appearing at the old Towson Theatre: Three men and a rebirth.The Recher brothers, whose grandparents and parents owned the popular movie house for several decades, have turned the defunct 1929 theater into an upscale billiards parlor and restaurant they plan to open this week.The project has been a labor of love for the siblings who worked at the theater when they were teen-agers, collecting tickets, selling candy and acting as ushers. For the past six months, they have been back at work there -- heavier work.
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