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By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | June 3, 2014
Musician Jack Johnson will accompany Howard County Executive Ken Ulman at a news conference and media tour of Merriweather Post Pavilion on Thursday, the county announced Tuesday.  Johnson is scheduled to perform at the venue later that evening.  The purpose of the tour is to walk through areas slated to be improved by a five-year, $19 million renovation plan, which was announced last month, between pavilion owner the Howard Hughes Corp....
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | June 3, 2014
Musician Jack Johnson will accompany Howard County Executive Ken Ulman at a news conference and media tour of Merriweather Post Pavilion on Thursday, the county announced Tuesday.  Johnson is scheduled to perform at the venue later that evening.  The purpose of the tour is to walk through areas slated to be improved by a five-year, $19 million renovation plan, which was announced last month, between pavilion owner the Howard Hughes Corp....
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 15, 2005
EVEN BLIND people can have 20/20 vision with hindsight. If we can agree on that can we agree that there was something quintessentially and infuriatingly American about Jack Johnson? Notice I didn't say "black American" or "African-American," which Johnson surely was. I said American: as in the kind of grass-roots, working-class, hell-raising rebel with a fierce and dogged determination we've come to cherish regardless of race and ethnicity, or gender for that matter. When I interviewed Ken Burns, he didn't say Johnson was "quintessentially American."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Though his tenure as the special agent in charge of the FBI's Baltimore field office wasn't long - just under three years - Richard A. McFeely helped oversee investigations that took out high-profile targets that had been on the radar of law enforcement long before he arrived.  As he moves on to FBI headquarters to become assistant director of criminal and cyber operations, McFeely agreed to discuss some of those cases with The Sun, including the...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2008
Jack Johnson ESSENTIALS: The soft-voiced surfer shared his smooth Hawaiian sound with the rest of the world. The college crowd embraced Johnson's easy-going grooves, catchy melodies and laid-back style. WHAT TO EXPECT: A breezy performance that's prime for summertime. WHEN AND WHERE: North Stage, 8:45 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH YURGEALITIS | March 2, 2006
G. Love and Special Sauce G. Love, most recently featured on the Curious George soundtrack with Jack Johnson, will play Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place, tonight with his band Special Sauce. The band has been around since 1994, when its first album was released. The show is at 9 p.m., and doors open at 8 p.m. Show is 18 and older. Tickets are $22.75 and can be purchased at the box office, at ramsheadlive.com or by calling 410-244-1131.
NEWS
November 16, 2010
I read that Gov. Martin O' Malley deemed the arrest of Jack Johnson and his wife a "sad day" for them and the county. What is he talking about? I think it is a great day for the public when a corrupt politician is found out and duly charged. Maybe the citizens of Prince George's will now get honest services for their tax dollars instead of patronage and cronyism. Jim Tabeling, Baltimore
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | September 16, 2004
Music Monthly party / The Funk Box The Funk Box, 10 E. Cross St., will help Music Monthly celebrate 20 years of styles -- funk, jazz, blues, R&B, and more -- Sunday starting at 1 p.m. Acts include Voodoo Blue, All Mighty Senators, the Kelly Bell Band and others. For more information, visit www.the funkbox.com or call 410-625-2001. Heart / Pier Six Heart was one of the most successful rock-pop outfits to emerge in the '70s. Although the unit watered down the formula a bit in the '80s, the band still sold a truckload of records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | May 22, 2003
On his spare second album, Jack Johnson, the Hawaii-based surfer whose 2001 debut, Brushfire Fairytales, came out of nowhere to sell more than a million copies, uses an easygoing islander's attitude and an old-school respect for simplicity to build the foundation for a musical back-to-nature movement. It's as if the agile Johnson, who sings in a perpetually "whatever, dude" style, is determined to provide a human alternative to the spotlessly clean music being made on computers. His latest album, On and On, opens with a prayer, "Times Like These," that centers on acoustic guitar and conga.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Jeff Barker and Lem Satterfield and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2005
Jack Johnson was a turn-of-the-century Muhammad Ali - a black man who could stylishly frustrate, taunt and dominate his white ring opponents with unparalleled boxing skills and an equally unrivaled gift of gab. All this while racial epithets were being hurled at him by angry crowds - and by the sporting press. To the sportswriters of the day, Johnson was "The Dinge," "The Ethiopian" or "The Big Smoke." "Jack Jeffries resembled a Greek god," the Los Angeles Times assured its readers before his meeting with Johnson in 1902, "while Johnson was just a good-natured, black animal - a long, lean, bullet-headed, flat-chested coon."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson was sentenced Tuesday to more than seven years in federal prison after admitting to a wide-ranging pattern of corruption that permeated virtually every level of county government from health to housing and law enforcement to liquor laws. Johnson, a 62-year-old Democrat, was arrested on extortion, bribery and evidence tampering charges in November 2010 while serving out the final weeks of his eight years as the leader of Maryland's second-most populous county.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
The case of former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson, who pleaded guilty to federal corruption charges in May, was back in the news this week after it was revealed that he is continuing to collect his $39,468 state pension, despite having admitted to taking more than $200,000 in bribes from developers. The disgraced former official reportedly has been collecting the money since January, thanks to a loophole in Maryland law that allows the state to deny public officials' pension benefits only if they are convicted of a crime while serving in office.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
The guilty plea by former Prince George's County executive Jack Johnson revives an all-too-familiar story in Maryland: the corrupt county executive shaking developers down for kickbacks. In a plea deal with federal prosecutors, Mr. Johnson on Tuesday admitted to receiving more than $400,000 in bribes, as well as to extortion and witness and evidence tampering. This is indeed, as current County Executive Rushern L. Baker III said, a sad day for Prince George's County, which has struggled to shed a reputation for corruption and a "pay-to-play" culture that compels companies wanting to do business with the county to pay off local officials.
NEWS
By Maria Glod and Ovetta Wiggins, The Washington Post | February 15, 2011
Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson accepted more than $200,000 in bribes and played a central role in a broad corruption conspiracy that involved other county officials, candidates for public office and at least three developers or business leaders, federal officials alleged in new charges filed Monday. A 31-page indictment filed in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt for the first time charges Johnson with soliciting and accepting bribes. It comes three months after Johnson and his wife, Leslie Johnson, were arrested at their home after they allegedly conspired to hide $79,600 in cash in Leslie Johnson's bra and flush a $100,000 check from a developer down the toilet.
NEWS
November 16, 2010
I read that Gov. Martin O' Malley deemed the arrest of Jack Johnson and his wife a "sad day" for them and the county. What is he talking about? I think it is a great day for the public when a corrupt politician is found out and duly charged. Maybe the citizens of Prince George's will now get honest services for their tax dollars instead of patronage and cronyism. Jim Tabeling, Baltimore
NEWS
November 16, 2010
If, as federal prosecutors assert, the arrests Friday of Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson and his wife on charges of evidence tampering and destruction of evidence are just the "tip of the iceberg" in a wider corruption probe, the case could make former Baltimore City Mayor Sheila Dixon's perjury and theft ordeal look like child's play. The investigation has already produced nine more arrests this week, including three Prince George's County police officers on charges involving drugs, guns and black-market alcohol and cigarettes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 16, 2005
The narration hums like poetry. The pictures seductively pull one toward the screen and into their world - even the still photographs seem to shimmer with the hidden energy of the moments they captured decades ago. The music is organically sublime - driving everything, from rhythm to tone. It's the heartbeat of the film. Those elements form the template for a Ken Burns' documentary, and all are present in Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson, a four-hour, two-night PBS film premiering tomorrow night.
NEWS
By Paul Schwartzman, Ruben Castaneda and Cheryl W. Thompson, The Washington Post | November 12, 2010
Just after 10:12 a.m. Friday, Leslie Johnson frantically phoned her husband, Jack B. Johnson, the Prince George's county executive. Two FBI agents were at the front door of their two-story brick colonial in Mitchellville. "Don't answer it," the county executive said, unaware that more agents were listening in. According to an FBI affidavit, Johnson ordered his wife to find and destroy a $100,000 check from a real estate developer that was hidden in a box of liquor. "Do you want me to put it down the toilet?"
NEWS
By Cheryl W. Thompson and Henri E. Cauvin, The Washington Post | November 13, 2010
The arrests Friday of Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson and his wife suggest that a federal investigation of corruption in county government, long a subject of rumor and speculation, is reaching critical mass. Law enforcement officials familiar with the probe, which is being overseen by the U.S. attorney for Maryland, said more arrests are expected, possibly this week. Johnson, a Democrat whose term ends next month, and his wife, Leslie Johnson, also a Democrat and newly elected to the County Council, were charged with destroying and tampering with evidence.
NEWS
By Paul Schwartzman, Ruben Castaneda and Cheryl W. Thompson, The Washington Post | November 12, 2010
Just after 10:12 a.m. Friday, Leslie Johnson frantically phoned her husband, Jack B. Johnson, the Prince George's county executive. Two FBI agents were at the front door of their two-story brick colonial in Mitchellville. "Don't answer it," the county executive said, unaware that more agents were listening in. According to an FBI affidavit, Johnson ordered his wife to find and destroy a $100,000 check from a real estate developer that was hidden in a box of liquor. "Do you want me to put it down the toilet?"
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