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Jack Armstrong

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NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | January 26, 1993
WON'T you tr-y-y-y Wheaties,Jack Armstrong never tires of it and neither will you.Radio station WITH will soon abandon its present big-band, golden oldies format in favor of what is loosely called children's programming.Sad as it is to learn of the disappearance from local airwaves of this rich and nostalgic musical fare, if the new format manages to engage children in the imaginative experience ("theater of the mind") of radio at its best, something good may yet result. And old-timers will remember their childhood days around the radio afternoons and Saturday mornings.
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MOBILE
By Tom Dunkel, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2006
They're at the top of the stretch ... On the outside, Efficiency. Here comes Town Cheer! ... Yankee Cashmere is trying to sweep from ninth ... Yankee Cashmere comes from last to take the stretch lead! A magnificent drive to ... win the Cadillac Breeders Crown! Twelve years later, the thrill isn't gone. "Fortunately, there have been many good races. This is one of them," says Chaz Keller on an early-November morning as he watches a video replay of Yankee Cashmere's 1994 miracle finish.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | September 7, 2006
Maybe your parents raised you, but they had lots of help from a playful pantheon of make-believe idols: Jack Armstrong the All American Boy set a fine example as an adventurous youth who was eager to learn as well. The "Crispness Chorus" of Snap, Crackle and Pop exhorted kids to eat their Rice Krispies. And Donald Duck always had the best of intentions. Each shaped generations of children as citizens and consumers, and made them a product of their time. To tour the new Geppi's Entertainment Museum in Camden Station is to reunite with those legions of imaginary characters who have instructed generations of Americans from infancy to old age. Geppi's Entertainment Museum is at 301 W. Camden St. September hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | September 7, 2006
Maybe your parents raised you, but they had lots of help from a playful pantheon of make-believe idols: Jack Armstrong the All American Boy set a fine example as an adventurous youth who was eager to learn as well. The "Crispness Chorus" of Snap, Crackle and Pop exhorted kids to eat their Rice Krispies. And Donald Duck always had the best of intentions. Each shaped generations of children as citizens and consumers, and made them a product of their time. To tour the new Geppi's Entertainment Museum in Camden Station is to reunite with those legions of imaginary characters who have instructed generations of Americans from infancy to old age. Geppi's Entertainment Museum is at 301 W. Camden St. September hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
On March 15, 2005 WILLIAM E. ARMSTRONG, JR. "UNCLE BILL"; beloved husband of the late Miriam N. Armstrong; loving uncle of Sr. Jeanne Armstrong, S.S.N.D., Jack Armstrong and his wife Mary and their sons, William and his wife Ticia, John and his wife Mary, Bob and his wife Judy and Mike and his wife Helen. Also survived by 11 loving great-great nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service will be celebrated in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road) Timonium-Cockeysvile on Saturday, April 9 at 11 A.M. Interment private.
SPORTS
August 5, 1991
BaseballBoston Red Sox -- Placed P Daryl Irvine (0-0, 6.00 ERA) on the 15-day DL retroactive to Thursday. Recalled P Jeff Plympton from Class AAA Pawtucket.Cincinnati Reds -- Optioned P Jack Armstrong (6-10, 5.57) to Class AAA Nashville. Placed OF Eric Davis (exhaustion and lower-back pain) on the 15-day DL retroactive to Wednesday. Called up P Mo Sanford and OF Chris Jones from Nashville.Houston Astros -- Placed C Scott Servais (no hits in 13 at-bats) on the 15-day DL. Called up C Tony Eusebio from Class AA Jackson.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 8, 1994
At Oriole Park at Camden YardsDay ...... Time ...... TV ..... StartersTonight .. 7:35 ...... 54 ..... Jamie Moyer (12-9, 3.43 in '93) vs........ .... ...... .. ..... Jack Armstrong (9-17, 4.49 in '93)Tomorrow.. 1:35 ...... HTS .... Kevin Brown (0-1, 9.00) vs........ ... ....... ... .... Mike Mussina (1-0, 1.12)Sunday ... 1:35 ...... HTS .... Rick Helling (big-league debut) vs........ .... ...... ... .... Arthur Rhodes (5-6, 6.51 in '93)Radio: All games on WBAL (1090 AM)Rangers updateThe Rangers, who open their new Ballpark in Arlington on Monday, won four of six in Baltimore last year, and won the season series, 8-4, for the first since 1986.
SPORTS
April 15, 1994
At The Ballpark in ArlingtonDay ... ... Time ... ... TV ... ... ... StartersTonight ... 8:35 ... ... 54, 50 ... ... Arthur Rhodes (0-1, 18.00) vs.... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Rick Helling (0-0, 9.00)Tomorrow .. 8:35 ... ... 54, 50 ... ... Ben McDonald (2-0, 2.57) vs.... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Kenny Rogers (0-2, 9.28)Sunday ... 8:05 ... ... ESPN .. ... ... Sid Fernandez (5-6, 2.93 in 1993) vs.... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Jack Armstrong (0-0, 3.00)Radio: All games on WBAL (1090 AM)
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | January 11, 1998
Dinner-party decorations have been relatively unchanged for centuries. Many a hostess has faced a large, long table that had nothing in the center. The void has been filled with attractive vases, epergnes, figurines and seasonal fruit and flowers.The 17th-century table featured large and small platters of food. The platters, often made of silver or gold, helped to declare the wealth and importance of the host.The food on the platters was prepared to be decorative. A cooked peacock was served with its colorful feathers adorning the platter, for instance.
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai | February 12, 1997
BEFORE HE BECAME the most highly rated of our presidents, Abraham Lincoln, whose birthday we celebrate today, was a clever and adroit lawyer. He handled disputes involving property and debts, divorce, slander and railroad interests. While representing the Illinois Central he received his highest fee -- $5,000 for protecting the railroad's property from county taxation. Then he was forced to sue for the fee. He won that case, too.Perhaps Lincoln's most famous, challenging and emotionally tinged case was the murder trial of the son of Jack Armstrong, an old friend from Lincoln's early days in Illinois.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
On March 15, 2005 WILLIAM E. ARMSTRONG, JR. "UNCLE BILL"; beloved husband of the late Miriam N. Armstrong; loving uncle of Sr. Jeanne Armstrong, S.S.N.D., Jack Armstrong and his wife Mary and their sons, William and his wife Ticia, John and his wife Mary, Bob and his wife Judy and Mike and his wife Helen. Also survived by 11 loving great-great nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service will be celebrated in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road) Timonium-Cockeysvile on Saturday, April 9 at 11 A.M. Interment private.
SPORTS
October 10, 2001
Cal Ripken's first major-league hit came against Dennis Lamp of the Chicago White Sox on Aug. 16, 1981. His last hit came against Frank Castillo of the Boston Red Sox in Game 1 of a doubleheader on Oct. 5, 2001. Ripken finished his career with 3,184 hits off 813 pitchers: Don Aase ......................... 2 Glenn Abbott ................... 4 Jim Abbott ..................... 13 Paul Abbott ..................... 6 Jim Acker ........................ 5 Joel Adamson ................. 1 Juan Agosto .....
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | January 11, 1998
Dinner-party decorations have been relatively unchanged for centuries. Many a hostess has faced a large, long table that had nothing in the center. The void has been filled with attractive vases, epergnes, figurines and seasonal fruit and flowers.The 17th-century table featured large and small platters of food. The platters, often made of silver or gold, helped to declare the wealth and importance of the host.The food on the platters was prepared to be decorative. A cooked peacock was served with its colorful feathers adorning the platter, for instance.
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai | February 12, 1997
BEFORE HE BECAME the most highly rated of our presidents, Abraham Lincoln, whose birthday we celebrate today, was a clever and adroit lawyer. He handled disputes involving property and debts, divorce, slander and railroad interests. While representing the Illinois Central he received his highest fee -- $5,000 for protecting the railroad's property from county taxation. Then he was forced to sue for the fee. He won that case, too.Perhaps Lincoln's most famous, challenging and emotionally tinged case was the murder trial of the son of Jack Armstrong, an old friend from Lincoln's early days in Illinois.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
A Today section article on June 7 about the Lancers Boys Club included incorrect information about the educational background of A. B. Krongard, a former club member and chief executive officer of Alex. Brown & Sons. Mr. Krongard is a graduate of Princeton University.The Sun regrets the error.Black-gowned and magisterial beneath a gilt eagle, Baltimore Judge Robert I. H. Hammerman sits in his vast solemn courtroom and listens to a case that tests the depths of the corruption of innocence and the violation of the trust of children.
SPORTS
April 15, 1994
At The Ballpark in ArlingtonDay ... ... Time ... ... TV ... ... ... StartersTonight ... 8:35 ... ... 54, 50 ... ... Arthur Rhodes (0-1, 18.00) vs.... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Rick Helling (0-0, 9.00)Tomorrow .. 8:35 ... ... 54, 50 ... ... Ben McDonald (2-0, 2.57) vs.... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Kenny Rogers (0-2, 9.28)Sunday ... 8:05 ... ... ESPN .. ... ... Sid Fernandez (5-6, 2.93 in 1993) vs.... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Jack Armstrong (0-0, 3.00)Radio: All games on WBAL (1090 AM)
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | April 9, 1994
Every game it's something different. Opening Day, an RBI double to the opposite field. Wednesday night, an explosive -- from first to third. Last night, a double in his first at-bat and a home run in his second.It's the dawning of the Jeffrey Hammonds Era, and it's something to behold. He might be the fastest player ever to wear an Orioles uniform. Thirty-six games into his major-league career, he already is one of the most exciting."I don't know what he's going to be," Orioles first base coach Davey Lopes was saying before last night's 7-5 loss to the Texas Rangers.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
DETROIT -- Orioles third baseman Chris Sabo, bothered by back stiffness, was out of the lineup yesterday and is questionable for today's series finale against the Detroit Tigers.Sabo said he felt his lower back stiffen while running from first to third in the seventh inning of Monday's game."I should only be out one game," Sabo said. "I could have played today, but they wanted to give it a day so I can be back in there tomorrow."Sabo left the park Monday expecting to be ready to play after the Orioles' day off, but woke up Tuesday morning feeling worse.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
DETROIT -- Orioles third baseman Chris Sabo, bothered by back stiffness, was out of the lineup yesterday and is questionable for today's series finale against the Detroit Tigers.Sabo said he felt his lower back stiffen while running from first to third in the seventh inning of Monday's game."I should only be out one game," Sabo said. "I could have played today, but they wanted to give it a day so I can be back in there tomorrow."Sabo left the park Monday expecting to be ready to play after the Orioles' day off, but woke up Tuesday morning feeling worse.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | April 9, 1994
Every game it's something different. Opening Day, an RBI double to the opposite field. Wednesday night, an explosive -- from first to third. Last night, a double in his first at-bat and a home run in his second.It's the dawning of the Jeffrey Hammonds Era, and it's something to behold. He might be the fastest player ever to wear an Orioles uniform. Thirty-six games into his major-league career, he already is one of the most exciting."I don't know what he's going to be," Orioles first base coach Davey Lopes was saying before last night's 7-5 loss to the Texas Rangers.
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