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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
The Orioles are back home after their first losing road trip of the season and will open an 11-game homestand Monday night against the Tampa Bay Rays. They still maintain a six-game lead over the New York Yankees in the American League East, but the standings have the potential to become bunched up again quickly. And Chris Davis continues to struggle at the plate. He was 2-for-22 with eight strikeouts in the six games in Chicago this past week. The Orioles scored just four runs in three games against the Cubs at Wrigley Field, including one run over a 16-inning span after Saturday's rain delay, and the offensive problems can't be pegged just on Davis.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Commuters entering Baltimore from the south on Monday morning found themselves in a massive traffic jam amid widespread confusion about how to navigate a new construction pattern, in part due to a failure by the Maryland Transportation Authority to update signage about the change. "It was way, way, way beyond anything I have seen," said Tamory Winfield, a MdTA spokesman, of the traffic problems on northbound Interstate 95. Crews are rushing to fix the issues before the afternoon rush hour, which will include a northbound influx of fans headed to tonight's Orioles game, he said.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
I am slowly losing faith in this nation, my nation, in its seeming inability to put race-related issues in our past. From a racial perspective, it sometimes feels like we are still on a slippery slope. That is simply unconscionable. People still fight wars over the pigment of one's skin, for being "different, not one of us. " Sadly, the pigmentation of one's skin is still a hurdle many Americans cannot seem to surmount. I believe Martin Luther King Jr. would be ashamed of where we are in the year 2014.
NEWS
By a Sun Staff reporter | August 21, 2014
Towson University President Maravene Loeschke is taking a leave of absence through the end of the year because of "health and personal challenges," she wrote in a letter to the university community Thursday. She had announced in April that she was diagnosed with cancer of the adrenal gland but expected to make a full recovery. She said at the time that the cancer was found early and that she had surgery and would undergo radiation therapy. University System of Maryland Chancellor William E. "Brit" Kirwan approved the leave, which was effective immediately.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baseball commissioner Bud Selig contends that the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network television rights dispute between the Orioles and the Washington Nationals can be resolved before he leaves office in January and that both Baltimore and Washington, D.C., are viable candidates to host an All-Star Game in the near future. Perhaps more important for Orioles fans, Selig said the two issues are not connected - that there is no consideration in holding the All-Star Game hostage from either franchise if the MASN legal entanglement continues.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun and By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Liz Sweeney of Timonium used to race her kayak while living in New York City. At the time, Sweeney would practice in the Hudson River, though public access to waterways was hard to find. Now, she is able to get up early and take her kayak to Loch Raven Fishing Center in Baltimore County, as she did on a recent day. Although she no longer races, she still uses her kayak for exercise. Elsewhere at the fishing center that day, minutes after Sweeney got out of the water, Rick Warner of Carney came in on his fishing boat following a morning excursion.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The operators of Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant have been cited for a miscalculation that federal safety inspectors said might have triggered an unnecessary evacuation or other emergency response to an insignificant radiation leak. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Friday it had preliminarily classified the mistake by Exelon Generation Co. as one of "low to moderate" safety significance. But an NRC spokesman said it could lead to increased federal scrutiny of the twin-reactor plant in Lusby, 70 miles south of Baltimore.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | August 6, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley, a presidential hopeful, has taken on yet another "pop issue," proposing that we provide foster care to several thousand unaccompanied Central American minors, lest they be sent to "certain death. " He has also championed abolition of capital punishment and the establishment of gay marriage, the Dream Act, and tax credits and fueling stations for electric vehicles whose technology is not ready for prime time. Is this latest pronouncement that of an instinctive demagogue or of a thoughtful statesman?
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
After a three-hour practice, Ravens wide receiver Marlon Brown signed a couple autographs, spoke briefly to reporters and then jogged back to the practice field to catch more passes from the JUGS machine. Brown, the second-year player who set a Ravens franchise rookie record in touchdown receptions last season, had his best practice of training camp Sunday, making a series of contested catches. It was another positive step forward for a player who struggled to hang onto the ball in the various offseason minicamps but now appears to be hitting his stride.     “At the end of the day, I just want to be a guy who is consistent, who is reliable, who you can count on everyday, not just on certain days,” Brown said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
About one in five cars on American roadways connects to outside parties via cellular telephone networks, transmitting data on drivers' speeding and braking habits, their location, and their vehicle's health and performance. By 2025, AAA predicts, all new cars will. Computers on board most vehicles on the road already collect and monitor such data, which can be downloaded at dealerships for repair purposes and shared with manufacturers, who say it's used to make cars safer and more reliable.
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