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NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | June 7, 2001
THE MITCHELL report correctly rejected the Palestinian claim that Ariel Sharon's peaceful visit to the Jewish Temple Mount in September caused the violence now convulsing Israel and the Palestinian territories. Yet the commission headed by former Sen. George Mitchell gravely erred by gratuitously suggesting that Israel unilaterally cease settlement activity in the West Bank. That recommendation rests upon faulty moral, legal and diplomatic ground. Polished Palestinian propaganda machines have worked diligently to portray a scenario of Israeli settlements choking Palestinian communities the way Wal-Marts and Food Lions have come to roll back the cornfields and encroach upon suburban America.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Pamela Becker, a graphics design production manager and artist, died of cancer Dec. 17 at her Owings Mills home. She was 64. Born Pamela Joyce Brown in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Henry Brown, who owned a jewelry distributorship, and his wife, Rosalyn Laskin Brown, an accountant at that business. She was raised on Hayward Avenue in Pimlico and later lived in Pikesville. She was a 1967 graduate of Pikesville High School, where she played lacrosse. She earned an associate's degree from Catonsville Community College.
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NEWS
By Amiram Goldblum | December 25, 2000
JERUSALEM -- At the July Camp David summit, Israeli negotiators suggested that the Jewish state could formally annex areas of the West Bank where the vast majority of settlers live and still leave Palestinians with enough territory to build a contiguous country. But a recent study from the Israeli Peace Now movement challenges that assumption. We found that -- despite the return of both sides to the negotiating table -- if Israel hopes to ever complete a peace agreement with the Palestinians, it must redraw its settlements map and accept the fact that far fewer settlers will be annexed into it than some had previously believed possible.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Paul Richter and Richard Boudreaux and Paul Richter,Tribune Newspapers | September 19, 2009
JERUSALEM - -President Barack Obama's Middle East envoy ended his most intensive round of shuttle diplomacy Friday without an agreement on one of the administration's top foreign policy goals, restarting Israeli-Palestinian talks as a step toward a broader regional peace. U.S. officials had hoped to coax enough concessions from Israel and the Palestinian Authority to help Obama announce a regional peace initiative next week. The timing is sensitive because a fresh round of talks on Palestinian statehood, the administration believes, could bolster the United States in a looming showdown with Iran over its nuclear ambitions.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 26, 1991
ARIEL SETTLEMENT, Israeli-Occupied West Bank -- Ron Nachman lowered the shatterproof window of his car and looked east across eight miles of rocky hillside, beyond a smattering of row houses to the campus of the Judea and Samaria College."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2003
JERUSALEM - Ahead of a meeting next week with President Bush, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon set a hard line yesterday on retaining Israeli settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Sharon dismissed as not "on the horizon" any talk of changing Israel's settlement policy, and he dismissed suggestions that the Bush administration was pressing him to dismantle settlements. During a visit here over the weekend, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said that he raised the issue of settlements with Sharon, and that Bush would pursue the matter when he sees Sharon on Tuesday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank use only 12 percent of the land allocated to them, but one-third of the territory they do use lies outside their official jurisdictions, according to a new report released yesterday by Peace Now, a dovish advocacy group. According to the report, based on official data released by the Israeli government after a court order, 90 percent of the settlements sprawl beyond their official boundaries despite the large amount of unused land already allocated to them.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 20, 2005
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Presaging a police crackdown designed to halt deadly rocket fire, Palestinian security forces prepared yesterday for an imminent deployment along Israel's border. At the same time, Israel agreed to resume security coordination with Palestinian forces, and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas met again with leaders of armed factions to try to persuade them to end attacks on Israeli settlements and towns. Israel had severed all contact with Abbas' government and threatened a major military offensive in Gaza after an ambush last week at a border crossing that killed six Israelis.
NEWS
By The Miami Herald | September 27, 1991
ISRAELI Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir has some traits in common with President George Bush. They are both hardheaded men.Their heedless game of chicken is also putting the U.S.-Israeli "special relationship" under enormous strain at a time when it should be moving harmoniously in a common purpose.Bush could show more flexibility regarding $10 billion in loan guarantees so that Israel can absorb an expected one million Soviet immigrants. Bush entreated Congress to delay considering the request for 120 days.
NEWS
October 12, 1999
SUNDAY, when the highway through Israel opens to link Gaza and the West Bank, Palestinians will gain tangible results long promised by the peace process.There's another in store, too: An Israeli Cabinet committee authorized Prime Minister Ehud Barak to dismantle any of 42 rogue Israeli settlements planted without legal authority in the West Bank. This is a token of what must come.On the other side, the Palestinian Authority has timidly begun to crack down on the illegal weapons trade in the West Bank.
NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | June 7, 2009
As the Obama administration moves to transform Palestinian arguments about Israeli settlements into U.S. policy, an examination of the facts underlying these issues is appropriate. There may be no better place to begin than the swimming pool at Rimonim, a Jewish settlement in the heart of the West Bank. The scene is a familiar one. Families picnicking together. Mothers yelling at children to be careful. Young children calling out to moms to watch them do dangerous things. But it is the view from the hilltop pool that is striking.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
Obama's settlement stand won't help Following is a reader comment on Friday's Sun editorial posted on baltimoresun.com/secondopinion. Obama's stand on the settlements will bring him grief. The Israelis feel besieged by Arab numbers. The Arab fertility rate is higher, and some if not all of the Israelis believe one day soon they will be outnumbered and diminished to a minority status in their own lands. The settlements, in their minds, are one way to keep a toehold where the Arabs are multiplying.
NEWS
September 2, 2008
While Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has committed himself time and again to forging a peace agreement with the Palestinians this year, his government has overseen a robust expansion of Jewish settlements in the contested West Bank. Mr. Olmert is not unlike other Israeli leaders in this respect, talking about peace while ignoring one of the most divisive issues in Israeli-Palestinian relations. The more settlements, the less land will be available for a future Palestinian state. It's a problem that only deepens with time.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel is enlarging 88 of its 122 West Bank settlements despite an agreement to halt the spread of Jewish communities in Palestinian territory, the watchdog group Peace Now said yesterday. A report by the group, which documented the construction of new homes with aerial photography and on-site visits, heated up the debate here over a key issue for the U.S.-sponsored peace summit expected to take place this year in Annapolis. Israel wants to keep large parts of settlements in a final peace accord, while the Palestinians demand the entire West Bank for a future state.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 11, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel is constructing a road through the West Bank, east of Jerusalem, that will allow both Israelis and Palestinians to travel along it - separately. There are two pairs of lanes, one for each group of people, separated by a tall wall of concrete patterned to look like Jerusalem stones, a beautification effort indicating that the road is meant to be permanent. The Israeli side has many exits; the Palestinian side has few. The point of the road, according to those who planned it under former Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, is to permit Israel to build more settlements around East Jerusalem, cutting the city off from the West Bank, but allowing Palestinians to travel unimpeded north and south through Israeli-held land.
NEWS
By PAUL RICHTER AND LAURA KING and PAUL RICHTER AND LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush yesterday praised Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's controversial plans to redraw the West Bank's borders as "bold ideas" that could open the way to a separate Palestinian state, even without agreement from Palestinian leaders. In his first White House meeting with the Israeli leader, Bush emphasized that he was only beginning to learn about Olmert's "convergence" plan, which would remove some smaller Israeli settlements on the West Bank while absorbing larger Israeli settlements into Israel.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 11, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel is constructing a road through the West Bank, east of Jerusalem, that will allow both Israelis and Palestinians to travel along it - separately. There are two pairs of lanes, one for each group of people, separated by a tall wall of concrete patterned to look like Jerusalem stones, a beautification effort indicating that the road is meant to be permanent. The Israeli side has many exits; the Palestinian side has few. The point of the road, according to those who planned it under former Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, is to permit Israel to build more settlements around East Jerusalem, cutting the city off from the West Bank, but allowing Palestinians to travel unimpeded north and south through Israeli-held land.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 2005
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Palestinians continued to celebrate a new sense of freedom yesterday, pouring across the temporarily open border with Egypt and through the abandoned Israeli settlements. President Mahmoud Abbas, in a televised speech last evening, urged Palestinians to "create a model and civilized Gaza," but he also vowed to restore order, beginning with small militant groups aligned with his own Fatah movement. "We are not going to tolerate chaos after today," he pledged. But yesterday, there was chaos aplenty, with thousands of Palestinians rushing across the border to Egypt to shop, while thousands of others continued salvaging salable or usable materials from the 21 former Israeli settlements.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 2005
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Palestinians continued to celebrate a new sense of freedom yesterday, pouring across the temporarily open border with Egypt and through the abandoned Israeli settlements. President Mahmoud Abbas, in a televised speech last evening, urged Palestinians to "create a model and civilized Gaza," but he also vowed to restore order, beginning with small militant groups aligned with his own Fatah movement. "We are not going to tolerate chaos after today," he pledged. But yesterday, there was chaos aplenty, with thousands of Palestinians rushing across the border to Egypt to shop, while thousands of others continued salvaging salable or usable materials from the 21 former Israeli settlements.
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