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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
Three couples soon will be scrambling for new venues to exchange vows if Anne Arundel County officials can persuade a Circuit Court judge to order Keith Osborne, owner of Fantasy Island Management Inc., to stop holding events at the property on exclusive St. Helena Island in Little Round Bay.One couple has scheduled a wedding June 5 on the scenic island. Two others are planned for September.County officials say Osborne, who has held parties at the house since 1997 and irritated his neighbors in nearby Little Round Bay communities, failed to get permission to create a private club and stage weddings and corporate affairs -- commercial use of residential property.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 2001
JAKARTA, Indonesia - As many at 1,000 people are reported missing after huge floods and landslides poured down mountainsides early yesterday on a remote Indonesian island, sweeping away entire villages and causing at least 60 deaths, local officials said. The deluge hit tiny Nias island, where surfers gather from around the world for the long breakers but where isolated mountain settlements are cut off from outside contact. Officials said they were sending out search-and-rescue missions despite the winds and high seas.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1992
TORONTO -- They're a hearty people, like Elizabeth Amer, a third-generation islander, who has just come off the icy ferry from the mainland trundling a "bundle buggy" with food and supplies for herself, her three cats and her dog.Ms. Amer, whose living-room window frames the sleek, silvery skyscrapers of downtown Toronto a mile across the water, is one of 650 residents of a sickle-shaped archipelago known locally as the Island.Although only 12 minutes by ferry to the mainland, this wind-lashed metropolitan outpost retains some of the character of simpler times, when it was the camping ground for Mississauga Indians hunting deer in what is now the Bay Street financial district.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Special to The Sun | December 4, 1994
Caribbean vacationers break down into two types: those who like to vegetate and those who like the vegetation. While the former are frying in their chaises and sipping pina coladas, the latter are hiking through rain forests, canteens strapped to their waists. While the former are lined up for seats at hotel "native" shows, the latter are out and about, sampling authentic community life and mingling with local folks who never dipped below a limbo stick.Having had my share of both experiences, I've emerged a vigorous proponent of the get-off-your-duff approach to island appreciation.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1999
TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- It's three weeks to graduation and the Tangier Combined School Class of 1999 -- eight girls and one boy -- has little time for sentimentality. What with fittings for caps and gowns, senior portraits, the senior trip to New York and the prom, their final days are a blur.After 13 years together, they know full well the choices they're making now will set most of them on course for lives far from the safety of this close-knit, deeply religious community of 600-plus inhabitants who think of themselves as one big extended family.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 10, 2005
OGNENNY ISLAND, Russia - The prisoners arrive here after riding for hours past abandoned villages in a gray truck with barred windows, finally crossing a rattling log bridge. Most will leave only when they die. Inmates whose bodies are unclaimed are interred in a small village graveyard not far from the island, under markers bearing serial numbers instead of names. This is Pyatak Prison, on an island in a lake in the midst of the thickly forested Vologda region, about halfway between Moscow and the Arctic Circle.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 1991
PEDDOCKS ISLAND, Mass. -- For decades, descendants of Portuguese fishermen and American soldiers have lived withoutelectricity or a clean water supply upon the rocky shores of this densely wooded patch of beach in the middle of Boston Harbor.Transporting everyday necessities by boat, islanders have survived on what they could carry and relied on oil lanterns, wood-burning stoves and bottled water to sustain them.Only a tugboat captain, the former caretaker and a retired couple brave the cold, stormy winters on the island; most, who consider themselves "islanders," live and work in Boston suburbs and seek refuge on the island during the summer and on weekends.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 2, 1997
Overcoming sickness, poor post position and the toughest group of fillies she has ever faced, Sanabelle Island won her 23rd straight race last night at the Meadowlands in East Rutherford, N.J.The 3-year-old Maryland-bred is now one victory from tying the record winning streak by a 3-year-old pacing filly.In 1973 and 1974, Handle With Care won 24 in a row.Trained and driven by Steve Warrington of Galena on the Eastern Shore, Sanabelle Island prevailed by a length in the first round of the Mistletoe Shallee Stakes.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
MARTHA'S VINEYARD, Mass. -- After church, the president and the first lady are at The Sweet Life for brunch, but the place to be on the Vineyard is Mel's Diner, where the blueberry pancakes can't be beat. At the window, you can see a flock of 1930s biplanes taking off and landing.Martha's Vineyard is 100 square miles of land seven miles off the southeast shore of Massachusetts' Cape Cod and a land that geography guarantees is always apart. It is a mostly flat, gentle expanse of green with dramatic clay cliffs and a stark lighthouse at its westernmost point, and a refuge from more hurried life.
NEWS
By Karen Shih and Karen Shih,Sun Reporter | July 12, 2008
In a new twist in a battle for beach access between local boaters and an island owner in the Magothy River, the local environmental association has filed a lawsuit in an attempt to force the owner to negotiate. The Magothy River Association alleges in the suit filed Thursday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that Dobbins Island is public land, because residents have been using the beaches there for decades. David L. Clickner Sr., the association claims, has reduced public access since buying the 7-acre island in 2004.
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