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NEWS
By John Rivera and Dail Willis and John Rivera and Dail Willis,National Weather ServiceSUN STAFF Sun staff writers Will Englund and Robert Hilson Jr. contributed to this article | February 6, 1996
The numbing, record-breaking cold wave that has Maryland in its grip brought discomfort and inconvenience to many yesterday as pipes froze and burst, engines stalled and exposed skin felt the sting of winter.But the residents of the islands in the Chesapeake Bay were truly in a bind, cut off from the mainland by ice that prevented the arrival of boats that regularly deliver mail and provisions. Ice-breaking cutters came to the rescue yesterday, bringing much-needed deliveries of staples such as food, milk and medicine.
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FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Special to The Sun | December 4, 1994
Caribbean vacationers break down into two types: those who like to vegetate and those who like the vegetation. While the former are frying in their chaises and sipping pina coladas, the latter are hiking through rain forests, canteens strapped to their waists. While the former are lined up for seats at hotel "native" shows, the latter are out and about, sampling authentic community life and mingling with local folks who never dipped below a limbo stick.Having had my share of both experiences, I've emerged a vigorous proponent of the get-off-your-duff approach to island appreciation.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 3, 1991
WABANA, Newfoundland -- The amorous meanderings of Belle, the lovesick bull moose of Bell Island, may remain unrequited despite the recent arrival of a young female moose with a similar penchant for swimming.For years, Belle has been looking for love in all the wrong places, and islanders have grown used to the sight of their only moose either chasing cows or resting in a meadow contentedly, if incongruously, surrounded by a cow harem."He thinks he's a bloody cow. Now he's resigned himself to just being friends," joked Kay Coxworthy, 49, who saw Belle swim ashore years ago. "He's so tame.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
Frank Hamons, the Maryland Port Administration's harbor development manager, figures he has eight years before the port of Baltimore runs out of room to deposit material dredged from the state's shipping channels. That's a blink of an eye in the world of harbor management. But Hamons and other port officials are hoping lawmakers and environmental regulators will warm to the idea of using dredge spoil to restore a number of islands that are slowly sinking into the Chesapeake Bay. Though potentially expensive, such a strategy could create wildlife habitat and buy the port time as it studies long-term solutions to its dredging problems.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
More than 40 angry Crownsville residents showed up at an Anne Arundel County hearing yesterday to rail against an Annapolis businessman's plan to turn part of a secluded island in Little Round Bay into a private club for weddings and parties.The residents, and Annapolis Alderman Louise Hammond and Gregory C. Pinkard, a Baltimore businessman whose family owns a third of St. Helena Island just off the Severn River, voiced their opposition during a three-hour hearing before Stephen M. LeGendre, the county administrative hearing officer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 1991
PEDDOCKS ISLAND, Mass. -- For decades, descendants of Portuguese fishermen and American soldiers have lived withoutelectricity or a clean water supply upon the rocky shores of this densely wooded patch of beach in the middle of Boston Harbor.Transporting everyday necessities by boat, islanders have survived on what they could carry and relied on oil lanterns, wood-burning stoves and bottled water to sustain them.Only a tugboat captain, the former caretaker and a retired couple brave the cold, stormy winters on the island; most, who consider themselves "islanders," live and work in Boston suburbs and seek refuge on the island during the summer and on weekends.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 2, 1997
Overcoming sickness, poor post position and the toughest group of fillies she has ever faced, Sanabelle Island won her 23rd straight race last night at the Meadowlands in East Rutherford, N.J.The 3-year-old Maryland-bred is now one victory from tying the record winning streak by a 3-year-old pacing filly.In 1973 and 1974, Handle With Care won 24 in a row.Trained and driven by Steve Warrington of Galena on the Eastern Shore, Sanabelle Island prevailed by a length in the first round of the Mistletoe Shallee Stakes.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
MARTHA'S VINEYARD, Mass. -- After church, the president and the first lady are at The Sweet Life for brunch, but the place to be on the Vineyard is Mel's Diner, where the blueberry pancakes can't be beat. At the window, you can see a flock of 1930s biplanes taking off and landing.Martha's Vineyard is 100 square miles of land seven miles off the southeast shore of Massachusetts' Cape Cod and a land that geography guarantees is always apart. It is a mostly flat, gentle expanse of green with dramatic clay cliffs and a stark lighthouse at its westernmost point, and a refuge from more hurried life.
NEWS
By Karen Shih and Karen Shih,Sun Reporter | July 12, 2008
In a new twist in a battle for beach access between local boaters and an island owner in the Magothy River, the local environmental association has filed a lawsuit in an attempt to force the owner to negotiate. The Magothy River Association alleges in the suit filed Thursday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that Dobbins Island is public land, because residents have been using the beaches there for decades. David L. Clickner Sr., the association claims, has reduced public access since buying the 7-acre island in 2004.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 10, 2005
OGNENNY ISLAND, Russia - The prisoners arrive here after riding for hours past abandoned villages in a gray truck with barred windows, finally crossing a rattling log bridge. Most will leave only when they die. Inmates whose bodies are unclaimed are interred in a small village graveyard not far from the island, under markers bearing serial numbers instead of names. This is Pyatak Prison, on an island in a lake in the midst of the thickly forested Vologda region, about halfway between Moscow and the Arctic Circle.
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