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Irvington

BUSINESS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 18, 1997
Old-timers used to call it Skulltown, a moniker bestowed on Irvington because of its three sprawling cemeteries. Loudon Park, Mount Olivet and New Cathedral cemeteries still dominate the landscape of this Southwest Baltimore nook, but the nickname isn't used much anymore. It's become a misnomer since a revitalization effort that has the streets teeming with life.Roughly bordered by Old Frederick Road to the north, Hilton Street on the east, Maidens Choice Run on the south and Beechfield Avenue to the west, the neighborhood is home to many people intent on preserving a safe, comfortable life within Baltimore City.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Brother James Kelly, president of Mount Saint Joseph High School for the last decade, died of prostate cancer early Saturday at his order's residence in Irvington. He was 64. In a letter he wrote to students and parents in October, he quoted the writings of St. Paul: "I have fought the good fight. I have finished the course. I have kept the faith. " He also said, "When I can't teach, I will know it's over. " He taught until the middle of last month. Born in Worcester, Mass., he earned a bachelor's degree in Latin and Greek from the Catholic University of America, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2000
A troubled, 220-bed Baltimore nursing home will be allowed to remain open as long as it is sold to new owners by March 1, state health officials have agreed. Carol Benner, head of the state's Office of Health Care Quality, said yesterday that a settlement with operators of the Irvington Knolls Care Center at 22 S. Athol Ave. will keep the facility open and avert the forced transfer of several hundred elderly patients. "It's a win-win situation," Benner said of the agreement. She added that a primary concern of the state was avoiding the transfer of patients to other facilities.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1997
It's simple and direct, the way Sarah Silkworth tries to keep the yards and alleys around her Irvington home orderly.Armed with a notebook and pen, she walks four blocks of streets and alleys, noting trash, whether the grass is cut and shrubbery trimmed.Usually, she doesn't wait for the city to act. Instead, she calls offending property owners and requests immediate action."Oh, sometimes you have people who get mad, who don't want to clean up, but they usually go ahead and do it," said Silkworth, 69."
NEWS
June 10, 2009
Charles W. Fisher, Funeral services will be Thursday, June 11, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Sharon Baptist Church, Irvington, VA.
NEWS
December 29, 1990
Gilbert L. Cressler, a Brooklyn resident who worked in construction and sales, died Wednesday of complications TC following a stroke at Irvington Knotts Care Center in Irvington. He was 84.He worked in the Baltimore area and abroad, particularly in South America and Europe.A Baltimore native, he was a member of the Mason's Marlay Lodge, No. 632 and Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Valley of Williamsburg.Mr. Cressler donated his body to the State Anatomy Board.He is survived by many nieces and nephews.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The Rev. Gerald Hynes, a Passionist priest who served in a Parkville parish for nearly 30 years, died of a stroke April 16 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised on Old Frederick Road in Irvington, he was the son of Thomas Hynes and Adelaide Zell Hynes. He was a 1943 graduate of Holy Cross Preparatory Seminary in 1943 and then began his formal training at St. Paul of the Cross Monastery in Pittsburgh. He completed his studies in philosophy and theology at several Passionist monasteries, and earned a master's degree in theology.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | January 4, 1991
Call it a sign of the times.The sign, a wooden replica of a 19th century Victorian house with a white front porch, reflects a revitalized Irvington neighborhood, where house prices have more than doubled in five years.Located on the 3300 block of Frederick Road, the 9-foot sign was unveiled yesterday by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, City Council President Mary Pat Clarke and other dignitaries.Onlookers clapped. About 20 or so pre-schoolers who were on hand for the dedication ceremony whooped and cheered.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
As a retired state parole and probation agent I remember the neighborhood concerns when my agency opened new offices. To some extent these concerns were valid because there was genuine uncertainty about how day to day life might change. Not so for Project PLASE which has an established 38-year track record as a good neighbor in central Baltimore City. As a member of St. Joseph's Monastery Parish, I attended the Dec. 17 meeting when people of all persuasions voiced their views (Project PLASE tries to quell neighborhood fears in S.W. Baltimore," Dec. 28)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2000
Benjamin Carroll Kohlhafer, who founded a Southwest Baltimore boys athletic club, died Thursday of cancer at Oak Crest Village Care Center. He was 88 and had lived on Marydel Avenue in Irvington. From the 1940s through the 1960s, he organized sports teams for children in the Irvington and Yale Heights neighborhoods. When other fathers didn't have time to help, he coached, umpired and kept score at the same time. "He was an energetic man who was so good for the youth in the neighborhood," said Patrick Hannon, a Catonsville resident who played on his teams in the 1950s.
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