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By Karol V. Menzie | December 18, 1994
There's something irresistibly festive about caviar -- it can make any occasion extraordinary. If you can't afford fine beluga, that's OK; Romanoff Caviar, from the T. Marzetti Co., costs less than $3.99 for a two-ounce jar of lumpfish caviar, and $5.99 for a two-ounce jar of whitefish caviar.Marzetti has some suggestions for serving caviar: Fill mushroom caps with onion-flavored sour cream dip and caviar, or hollow out cherry tomatoes and fill with sour cream, top with caviar and sprig of dill.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
"Bat Boy: The Musical" may not be what one expects - there's not a baseball in sight - but it's still a must-see show in all aspects, captivating Colonial Players audiences since it opened in March. Set to a melodic pop-rock score, this tabloid tale - direct from Weekly World News - is set in a small West Virginia town where a half-human, half-bat mutant is found in a cave by the spelunking Taylor siblings, Ron, Rick and Ruthie. The tale unfolds as Bat Boy learns to behave most civilly toward towns folk - who respond less civilly toward him. The Colonial Players production of "Bat Boy" compares well to another renowned version of the show: the 2001 off-Broadway run at Union Square Theater, which captured several off-Broadway musical awards.
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By Kelly Milner Halls and Kelly Milner Halls,Chicago Tribune | October 29, 1998
If you hear there's something gross around, chances are you'll wanna see it. If it stinks, oozes or pulsates, half the neighborhood might come running. But why? What makes "gross" almost irresistible to mankind? And how do we define exactly what "gross" is?"It's hard to define gross," says William I. Miller, who wrote "The Anatomy of Disgust," "because it will often vary from one culture to the next. But what is constant is that each culture will find something disgusting."Sylvia Branzei, author of the cool "Grossology" books, says: "Anything that makes your nose turn up and your stomach clinch is gross."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 26, 2009
Only cool-tempered Swedes could take a hot-blooded Italian expression like "Mamma mia" (imagine Anna Magnani saying it) and use it without any syllabic stress in a light, snappy song, as if the value of the two words derived from their alliterative appeal alone. But Bjorn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson knew just what they were doing in generating that song, and a whole bunch like it, for their famed group ABBA. The way those guys could match any string of words to magnetic melodic hooks proved magical in the 1970s and early 1980s, leading to a pop music phenomenon of global proportions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 7, 2002
I know of no writer, living or dead, who has more profoundly explored the common enigma that might best be called the inhumanity of innocence than Michael Frayn. He is, however, far from a specialist. At 68, he is one of the masters of English letters. He has just published his 10th novel. He has written 13 plays, among them Copenhagen, which won three Tony Awards in 2000. He has also written screenplays, translations and the libretto for an opera. Copenhagen is a drama about an extended conversation that took place between Werner Heisenberg, the German physicist, and Nils Bohr, his Danish mentor, early in World War II. They examine the implication of nuclear physics and of the interplay of personal moral responsibility with science, politics and atavism.
FEATURES
By Eating Well Magazine | June 2, 1993
If you crave fatty food, don't blame it on lack of willpower. Blame it on your brain.Neuroscientist Sarah Leibowitz of Rockefeller University in New York has found evidence that the brain protein galanin urges the body to consume fat-rich foods.The more galanin residing in the hypothalamus, the more irresistible fatty foods become. An experimental drug called M40 can block the action of galanin and the appetite for fat that it creates.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
Notes Liberty's blueprint: Last week, when presidential candidate Mike Huckabee suggested that the U.S. Constitution might be amended to better comport with God's law, there was widespread shocked reaction. Americans take their Constitution seriously, even as they argue endlessly about what it means and how it might be amended. Now comes Michael I. Meyerson, a University of Baltimore law professor, with a new book that promises significant help for those of us confused about the intent of the Founding Fathers when they drafted the constitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2006
CUTEOVERLOAD.COM What's the point? -- Overdosed on bad news, sad news, boring news? Hit this site for things that'll make you go "awwwwwwwwww." Baby animals, cute products, funny reader letters, but mostly just the first -- animals looking so stinking adorable that you can barely handle it. (Or maybe that's just us.) What to look for --Click on the "Rules of Cuteness" category to find out just what makes a photo uber-irresistible. These include: multiple species of animal in one picture, animals mimicking humans and inquisitive facial expressions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 16, 2001
Odds & Ends, by Robert Crumb (Bloomsbury, 136 pages, $34.95). If you know the work and life of Robert Crumb, you need no recommendation to have a serious look at this major new collection of his work. Crumb is, of course, best known as a brilliant innovator of comic and cartooning art forms. But this gathering together of his work, going back to high school sketches from 1963, presents a dazzling array of images that range from wine labels to greeting cards to portraits of friends to record jackets to magazine and newspaper illustrations -- and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 20, 2002
Secret Knowledge: Rediscovering the Lost Techniques of the Old Masters, by David Hockney (Viking Studio, 296 pages, $60). David Hockney's two-year purposeful pursuit of his proposition that many of the Old Master painters used lenses and / or prisms as aids to their draftsmanship has now been seminared, colloquiumed, discoursed and debated all over the world -- and remains the most intriguing arts controversy in decades. Hockney is not only a historically important and innovative painter in his own right; he is a splendid arts detective and theorist.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 13, 2008
With 1996's Fargo (8 p.m., AMC), Joel and Ethan Coen found mass acceptance without sacrificing a scintilla of their indie cred - no small accomplishment in an era when popular and critical tastes were becoming increasingly polarized. This, the brothers' sixth film together (they both write; Joel gets the directing credit), follows the classic Coen formula: a bunch of doofuses get together and try something either illegal or stupid (often both). They find themselves in way over their heads and don't have a clue what to do next.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Terrell Suggs couldn't have flown under the radar yesterday even if he had tried. But anyone who knows him knew he wasn't going to try. And his teammates and coaches made sure Suggs wouldn't end up there, anyway. Suggs' prints were all over the scene of the crime the Ravens committed against the Oakland Raiders, a deceptive 29-10 victory at M&T Bank Stadium. Every plot line ran through him. Even when the Ravens had the ball - especially then. It would have been plain wrong for John Harbaugh to pass up the chance to toy with the living, breathing headline machine Suggs had been all week.
NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY | August 3, 2008
When my family migrated north from South Carolina, they brought with them precious culinary traditions passed from one generation to the next. Take rice, for example: It was rare not to find a pot of this starchy Southern staple on the back burner of my grandmother's stove. Another was the scrumptious vegetable stew that we called "granddaddy's soup," consisting of fresh corn, fresh tomatoes, fresh limas and fresh okra. And then, greens - mustards, turnips, collards or any combination of the three, served with hot pickled peppers on the side.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | July 27, 2008
Baltimore's retail renaissance and beleaguered mayor converged this week, two Targets, together, at Mondawmin Mall. If Sheila Dixon feels like she has a bull's-eye on her back, it didn't keep her from the opening of a store with the circle-dot logo. Shopping helped put Dixon in her current fix with prosecutors. So the retail setting could have been a little awkward. But when Dixon spoke about her shopping habits, there was no mention of Giorgio Armani, Jimmy Choo or Mano Swartz, names not found on the shelves of discount retailers, even those as hip as Chez Tar-jay.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
Notes Liberty's blueprint: Last week, when presidential candidate Mike Huckabee suggested that the U.S. Constitution might be amended to better comport with God's law, there was widespread shocked reaction. Americans take their Constitution seriously, even as they argue endlessly about what it means and how it might be amended. Now comes Michael I. Meyerson, a University of Baltimore law professor, with a new book that promises significant help for those of us confused about the intent of the Founding Fathers when they drafted the constitution.
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | January 20, 2008
Deep-frying is the bacon of cooking techniques: It makes everything taste better. Do it with beignets, though, and you get the irresistible results in a more lyrical package. The word is almost as satisfying to say as the real thing is to eat. Beignets sound so much lighter and airier than fritters, but they are no easier to pass up. The most famous beignets in this country are a New Orleans specialty: squares of yeasty dough fried until puffy, then smothered in powdered sugar, to be eaten with the local chicory coffee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 13, 1991
KEEP IT COMIN'Keith Sweat (Elektra 61216)Because he helped pioneer the hip hop-powered sound of new jack swing, fans have come to expect a certain amount of rhythmic insistence from Keith Sweat, and his current album, "Keep It Comin'," certainly delivers on that front. Indeed, from the bouncy beats of "Let Me Love You" to the sample-studded groove of the title tune, the album is an almost irresistible inducement to dance. Even so, what makes this music worth returning to isn't the way it swings, but the way Sweat sings.
NEWS
By Jay Searcy and Jay Searcy,Knight-Ridder | October 1, 1995
"Only in America: The Life and Crimes of Don King," by Jack Newfield. New York: William Morrow. 342 pages. $23 With his trademark electric hair and irresistible celebrity, the world has dismissed Don King as little more than a bright, self-promoting eccentric who dresses garishly, misquotes Shakespeare and jokes about his past as a one-time Cleveland bagman and convict.Now, thanks to four years of tenacious research and a masterful job of storytelling by Jack Newfield, a longtime boxing fan and New York Post politics columnist, we get to see another side of this remarkably resilient rascal, who has virtually dominated boxing for two decades.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | November 16, 2007
The end of President Bush's time in office is still 14 months away, but already, I can guarantee two things. First, the next president will be elected on a promise to lead the U.S. to energy independence. Second, the promise won't be kept. As it happens, every major contender, Republican as well as Democratic, has vowed to liberate us from the cruel grip of imported oil. To take two random samples, here's Mitt Romney: "The United States must become energy independent. Our decisions and destiny cannot be bound to the whims of oil-producing states."
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